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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 10, NUMÉRO 9, SEPTEMBRE 2015

Pour le format PDF, cliquer ici!

TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Government Mapping of the Third Sector: A Government Innovation for Regulation and Coordination? Perspectives From the Third Sector

New Public Governance, the Third Sector, and Co-Production (book)

Exploring the Dimensions of Nonprofit Competition through its Supplementary, Complementary, and Adversarial Relationships with Government

Stakeholder Engagement in the Social Entrepreneurship Process: Identity, Governance and Legitimacy

Uncovering Micro-Practices and Pathways of Engagement That Scale Up Social-Driven Collaborations: A Practice View of Power

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

New Paths for Third-Sector Institutions in a Welfare State in Crisis: The Case of Portugal

The Nonprofit World: Civil Society and the Rise of the Nonprofit Sector (book)

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

The Weight of the Social Economy: An International Perspective (book)

A Framework for Assessing the Performance of Nonprofit Organizations

Co-operatives for Sustainable Communities. Tools to Measure Co-operative Impact and Performance (book)

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Commercialization in the Non-Profit Sector: The Emergence of Social Enterprise in Cambodia

Why Social Enterprises are Asking to Be Multi-Stakeholder and Deliberative: An Explanation Around the Costs of Exclusion

Shared Leadership and its Implications for Nonprofit Leadership

Role Fluidity and Emergent Followership: How Nonprofit Leaders Communicate Their Relationship as/to Followers

The Social and Economic Mission of Social Enterprises: Dimensions, Measurement, Validation, and Relation

Questioning the Legitimacy of Social Enterprises through Gramscian and Bourdieusian Perspectives: The Case of British Social Enterprises

Traversing the Terrain of Context in Social Entrepreneurship

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

How the Social Economy Produces Innovation

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Political Voice and Civic Attentiveness of Public and Non-Profit Employees

Contra Spem Spero: The Third Sector’s Resilience in the Face of Political Turbulence and Legislative Change in Ukraine

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Perspectives of social economy in Romania

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Efficiency, stability and the decision to give to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in the United States

From Social Housing to Subsidized Housing? Accommodating Low-Income Households in Europe

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

Social enterprise, accountability and social accounting

VARIA

Guide pratique : Université et économie sociale et solidaire

Les clusters d’innovation sociale. Analyse et bonnes pratiques européennes

Spécificités et contributions de la nébuleuse de l'économie sociale et solidaire : Une réflexion à partir du contexte vaudois

ACTES DE COLLOQUES

CONFERENCE PAPERS / PUBLICACIONES DE EVENTOS CIENTIFICOS

La créativité de l'ESS est-elle soluble dans l'entrepreneuriat ?

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 


ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes


Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general


Government Mapping of the Third Sector: A Government Innovation for Regulation and Coordination? Perspectives From the Third Sector

Susan Appe. International Journal of Public Administration, volume 38, issue 10, pages 724-733, August 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg

/lpad/2015/00000038/00000010/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This article examines the policy tool of a registry of civil society organizations in a regulatory transparency framework. A registry serves as a government ‘mapping’ tool by collecting data on civil society and nonprofit organizations. Do government efforts to map the third sector hinder or foster nonprofit organizations’ capacity and their coordination? The balance between regulation and the strengthening of nonprofit organizations’ capacity and the coordination of goods and services through government innovations like the registries—i.e., third sector mappings—might indeed have the potential to foster a more effective and efficient third sector.


New Public Governance, the Third Sector, and Co-Production (book)

Victor Pestoff, Taco Brandsen and Bram Verschuere. Routledge Edition, 406 pages, August 2015.

https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415897136

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “In recent years public management research in a variety of disciplines has paid increasing attention to the role of citizens and the third sector in the provision of public services. Several of these efforts have employed the concept of co-production to better understand and explain this trend. This book aims to go further by systematizing the growing body of academic papers and reports that focus on various aspects of co-production and its potential contribution to new public governance. It has an interdisciplinary focus that makes a unique contribution to the body of knowledge in this field, at the cross-roads of a number of disciplines - including business administration, policy studies, political science, public management, sociology, third sector studies, etc. The unique presentation of them together in this volume both allows for comparing and contrasting these different perspectives and for potential theoretical collaboration and development. More particularly, this volume addresses the following concerns: What is the nature of co-production and what challenges does it face? How can we conceptualize the concept of co-production? How does co-production works in practice? How does co-production unfold in reality? What can be the effects of co-production? And more specific, firstly, how can co-production contribute to service quality and service management in public services, and secondly, what is the input of co-production on growing citizen involvement and development of participative democracy?”


Exploring the Dimensions of Nonprofit Competition through its Supplementary, Complementary, and Adversarial Relationships with Government

Teresa Marie Derrick-Mills. Nonprofit Policy Forum, volume 6, issue 2, pages 243–262, August 2015.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/npf.2015.6.issue

-2/npf-2014-0022/npf-2014-0022.xml

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Nonprofits contribute to communities and society through service delivery, innovation, knowledge-building, and civic engagement. They frequently partner with and push government to better serve its citizens through relationships that have been characterized as supplementary, complementary, and adversarial (Young 2006). In all of these roles and relationships, nonprofits must compete for resources, time, and attention with other nonprofits, government entities, and for-profit organizations within communities, nationally, and internationally. Competition sometimes shapes and sometimes is shaped by public policies that affect the rules of the game. In this conceptual paper, we explore the dimensions of nonprofit competition and the implications for the nonprofit–government supplementary, complementary, and adversarial relationships.”


Stakeholder Engagement in the Social Entrepreneurship Process: Identity, Governance and Legitimacy

Lauren Smith and Christine Woods. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 6, issue 2, pages 186-217, September 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080

/19420676.2014.987802#abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This paper explores how stakeholder expectations are managed through the social entrepreneurship process of opportunity construction, evaluation and pursuit. Building on an in-depth case study, a model of stakeholder engagement through identity, governance and legitimacy is presented. Stakeholders are managed by an identity constructed through an integration of the organization's multiple identities to form a meta-identity. Governance is important in the management of stakeholders in order to be entrepreneurial while being accountable. Stakeholders support the organization based on legitimacy that is gained through creating stakeholder value and by conforming to existing social structures as well as creating new operating models, practices and idea


Uncovering Micro-Practices and Pathways of Engagement That Scale Up Social-Driven Collaborations: A Practice View of Power

Sonia Tello-Rozas, Marlei Pozzebon and Chantale Mailhot. Journal of Management Studies (in press), August 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/

10.1111/joms.12148/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper explores how large-scale social-driven collaborations might grow in scale and help promote political change. We present the results of a qualitative investigation of a complex platform where multiple and hybrid collaborations co-exist and where civil society plays a central role. Based on a longitudinal comparative case study, we draw a processual model describing micro-practices and pathways of engagement. We show that the emergence of these collaborations requires a new type of convener, one that is able to manage the interplay between the sharing/co-creation of abundant resources and the coordinated decentralization of informal authority. Our study extends existing debates on the role of resources and authority, showing the complementarity between possession and practice perspectives of power. Finally, we identified synergies between collaboration and social movement literatures, particularly showing that large-scale collaborations could be mobilized to refine social movement agendas and achieve more purposive collective action.”



MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento


New Paths for Third-Sector Institutions in a Welfare State in Crisis: The Case of Portugal

Sílvia Ferreira. Nonprofit Policy Forum, volume 6, issue 2, pages 213- 241, August 2015.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/npf.2015.

6.issue-2/npf-2014-0025/npf-2014-0025.xml

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article describes the recent changes in the political, cultural and socioeconomic environment of the third sector (TS) in Portugal in the context of crisis and structural adjustment. Belatedly, when compared to many other countries, an overall sector is being structured in Portugal, overcoming the traditional neglect of the political system and the divisions inside the field. The historical institutional approach is here used to make sense of the current changes and debates and the different policy coalitions in place are identified through present and past policy analysis and content analysis of policy debates. This provides a broad background for exploring the hypothesis that the Portuguese TS may be arriving at a critical juncture that will set a new path under the development of a new and broader identity as “social economy.” This paper identifies path-breaking trends, as well as continuities. It argues that the structuring axis TS/welfare state, which has been the driving force of the TS in Portugal, is shifting to the axis TS/economy as a result of changes in both the TS and its political coalitions’ strategies and in the broader context and institutional framework of the welfare state.”


The Nonprofit World: Civil Society and the Rise of the Nonprofit Sector (book)

John Casey. Lynne Rienner Publishers, Kumarian Press, 350 pages, July 2015.

https://www.rienner.com/title/The_Nonprofit_World

_Civil_Society_and_the_Rise_of_the_Nonprofit_Sector

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “John Casey explores the expanding global reach of nonprofit organizations, examining the increasingly influential role not only of prominent NGOs that work on hot-button global issues, but also of the thousands of smaller, little-known organizations that have an impact on people's daily lives. What do these nonprofits actually do? How and why have they grown exponentially? How are they managed and funded? What organizational, political, and economic challenges do they face? Casey answers these questions and also, liberally using case studies, situates the evolution of the sector in the broader contexts of differing national environments and global public affairs. With its broad perspective, The Nonprofit World affords readers a thorough understanding of both the place of nonprofits in the global arena and the implications of their growing importance.



ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación


The Weight of the Social Economy: An International Perspective (book)

Marie J. Bouchard et Damien rousselière (eds.). Peter Lang Editions; 334 pages, September 2015.

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.

seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=88401&cid

=888&concordeid=574287

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “What is the weight of the social economy? How should we measure it? Throughout the world, cooperatives, non-profit and mutual benefit organizations, foundations and other social enterprises play an important role in job creation, social cohesion, social innovation, regional development and environmental protection. Observations tend to confirm the ability of the social economy to contribute to balancing economies, mainly by serving as an anti-cyclical force in the face of economic crises. However, many countries and regions lack statistical information about its weight, size and scope on their territory. This book fills a gap in the literature about the social economy. It seeks to explain why it is important to have statistics on it, to understand how they are produced, and to project how the social economy might be better understood in the future. The book offers researchers and decision-makers an overview of the current state of knowledge on these topics.”


A Framework for Assessing the Performance of Nonprofit Organizations

Chongmyoung Lee and Branda Nowell. American Journal of Evaluation, volume 36, issue 3, pages 299-319, September 2015.

http://aje.sagepub.com/content/36/3/299?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Performance measurement has gained increased importance in the nonprofit sector, and contemporary literature is populated with numerous performance measurement frameworks. In this article, we seek to accomplish two goals. First, we review contemporary models of nonprofit performance measurement to develop an integrated framework in order to identify directions for advancing the study of performance measurement. Our analysis of this literature illuminates seven focal perspectives on nonprofit performance, each associated with a different tradition in performance measurement. Second, we demonstrate the utility of this integrated framework for advancing theory and scholarship by leveraging these seven perspectives to develop testable propositions aimed at explaining variation across nonprofits in the adoption of different measurement approaches. By better understanding how performance measurement is conceptualized within sector, the field will be better positioned to both critique and expand upon normative approaches advanced in the literature as well as advance theory for predicting performance measurement decisions.”


Co-operatives for Sustainable Communities. Tools to Measure Co-operative Impact and Performance (book)

Leslie Brown, Chiara Corini, Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, Lou Hammond-Ketilson, Elizabeth Hicks, John McNamara, Sonja Novkovic, Daphne Rixon and Richard Simmons. Edited by the Centre for the Study of Co-operatives at the University of Saskatchewan, 379 pages, August 2015.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/co-operatives-

for-sustainable/id1032790909?ls=1&mt=11

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The Measuring the Co-operative Difference Research Network (MCDRN) and the Centre of Excellence in Accounting and Reporting for Co-operatives (CEARC) joined forces in 2014 to organize an international conference, focused on how and why co-operatives assess their performance and their impacts on society. Over a period of 3 days co-operative practitioners and researchers from Europe, North America and Latin America discussed the strengths and weaknesses of the various tools used by co-operatives, and considered how best to obtain and share reliable and accurate information on co-operative performance and impact. The conference was exploring five interconnected themes: Statistics and data collection Putting co-operative principles into practice Community impact Member and stakeholder engagement Reporting practices (co-operative identity and sustainability). The chapters in this book are organized according to these five themes. They offer an international snapshot of the work being undertaken in these areas, with the intention of sharing the knowledge and experience obtained thus far. The authors advocate a critical analysis of these materials, and suggest ways forward as practitioners and researchers address the reporting and dissemination challenges identified during the conference.


Gestion

Management / Gestión


Commercialization in the Non-Profit Sector: The Emergence of Social Enterprise in Cambodia

Sothy Khieng and Heidi Dahles. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 6, issue 2, pages 218-243, September 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/194

20676.2014.954261#abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The increasing commercialization among non-profit organizations is shifting financial dependence from charitable donations to self-generated earned income through social entrepreneurial ventures. Little is known about the consequences of this shift. There is a lack of literature discussing how ventures into social entrepreneurship by non-profit organizations evolve and what effects they have on multiple dimensions of these organizations. To address this gap, the aim of this paper is to describe and analyse processes of commercialization of non-profit sector organizations and their effects on social-entrepreneurial NGOs in Cambodia. The data used in this study is based on a large-scale quantitative survey and qualitative key informant interviews with NGO leaders and administrators of NGOs in five regions across Cambodia. The authors found that the struggle for social and financial sustainability is one of the major motivations for organizations engaging in commercial ventures. Commercialization has transformative effects on the goals, motives, methods, income distribution, and governance component of NGOs in the sample. At the same time, however, commercialization tends to sideline the social mission of NGOs.


Why Social Enterprises are Asking to Be Multi-Stakeholder and Deliberative: An Explanation Around the Costs of Exclusion

Carlo Borzaga and Silvia Sacchetti. Euricse Working Papers, 75/15, 26 pages, April 2015.

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?

abstract_id=2594181  

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The study of multi-stakeholdership (and multi-stakeholder social enterprises in particular) is only at the start. Entrepreneurial choices which have emerged spontaneously, as well as the first legal frameworks approved in this direction, lack an adequate theoretical support. The debate itself is underdeveloped, as the existing understanding of organisations and their aims resist an inclusive, public interest view of enterprise. Our contribution aims at enriching the thin theoretical reflections on multi-stakeholdership, in a context where they are already established, i.e. that of social and personal services. The aim is to provide an economic justification on why the governance structure and decision-making praxis of the firm needs to account for multiple stakeholders. […] Our model highlights that when social costs derived from exclusion are high, even an enterprise with costly decisional processes, such as the multi-stakeholder, can be the most efficient solution amongst other possible alternatives.


Shared Leadership and its Implications for Nonprofit Leadership 

Robert L. Routhieaux. Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, volume 5, issue 3, June 2015.

http://js.sagamorepub.com/jnel/article/view/6529

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Shared leadership can provide a foundation for nonprofit organization sustainability. A culture of shared leadership can enhance an organization’s resilience and adaptability and help ensure its ability to navigate turbulence and uncertainty. A literature review on key concepts and research on shared leadership is provided in this article. This background is then used to frame recent trends in the nonprofit sector and how shared leadership might enable nonprofit organizations to navigate current and future trends more effectively. Finally, specific suggestions for developing a culture of shared leadership are provided.”


Role Fluidity and Emergent Followership: How Nonprofit Leaders Communicate Their Relationship as/to Followers

Curt A. Gilstrap and Ashley Morris. Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, volume 5, issue 3, pages 139-152, June 2015.

http://js.sagamorepub.com/jnel/article/view/6530

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Followership is integral to the growth and activity of nonprofits, yet it lacks broad investigation by organizational researchers. We assessed followership from the perspective of organizational leaders within the nonprofit sector, and this study generates an understanding of the followership concept as it relates to nonprofit membership and strategic behaviors. Based upon qualitative interviews, this study demonstrates that nonprofit leaders communicate followership as a role-fluid concept and as an emergent behavior among nonprofit members. Developing a tripartite typology of Uninvested Followers, Invested Followers, and Leader Preparation Followers, and recognizing subthemes of leader Passion, Vision, and Choice, we suggest that nonprofits need to understand followership as an organizing concept through which members emerge from leader to follower or from follower to leader dependent on strategic organizational and stakeholder needs.”


The Social and Economic Mission of Social Enterprises: Dimensions, Measurement, Validation, and Relation

Robin Stevens, Nathalie Moray and Johan Bruneel. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, volume 39, issue 5, pages 1051–1082, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111

/etap.12091/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Social entrepreneurs have a dominant social mission and generate revenue to ensure financial viability. However, most research treats the extent to which social entrepreneurs actually adhere to social and economic mission as a black box. Performing higher order confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of social enterprises (N270), this study identifies dimensions and validates measures for understanding and delineating social and economic missions, and shows how the two constructs relate to each other. The theoretical untangling and the empirical validation of social and economic missions as distinct constructs—and multiple potential constellations of attached relative importance—opens up opportunities for quantitative hypothesis-testing research in social entrepreneurship.”


Questioning the Legitimacy of Social Enterprises through Gramscian and Bourdieusian Perspectives: The Case of British Social Enterprises

Katerina Nicolopoulou, Iain Lucas, Ahu Tatli, Mine Karatas-Ozkan,  Laura A. Costanzo, Mustafa Özbilgin and  Graham Manville. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 6, issue 2, page 161-185, May 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/

19420676.2014.961095#abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Drawing on data from six social enterprises in the UK, this paper demonstrates that social enterprises negotiate their legitimacy borrowing from the state, the corporation and the service logics. The paper illustrates the existential crises of legitimacy as experienced in the social enterprise sector. The utility of a principled ethical approach is discussed as a way forward. The paper also outlines challenges that social enterprises face when adopting an ethical approach. Theoretical tools of Gramsci and Bourdieu are mobilized in the paper in order to render visible the often implicit and questioned structures of hegemonic power that shape the habitus of legitimacy in social enterprises.”


Traversing the Terrain of Context in Social Entrepreneurship

Anne De Bruin and Kate V. Lewis. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 6, issue 2, pages 127-136, September 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.

1080/19420676.2015.1038005#abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The terrain of context in social entrepreneurship is not uniform. It is complex and has a variety of contours. This article provides an original typological conceptual framework to advance a deeper understanding of how the different contours of context can shape and also be shaped by the enactment of the processes of social entrepreneurship. It draws on the collection of articles in the special issue to illuminate the framework and describes four distinct roles that context can play in relation to the enactment of social entrepreneurship. It also uses the framework to springboard discussion on a future research agenda.



Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social


How the Social Economy Produces Innovation

Potts Jason and Hartley John. Review of Social Economy (in press), August 2015

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?

eid=2-s2.0-84940421513&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert

&txGid=86FDE2C619DA0E03CD3AB0970248899B.

53bsOu7mi7A1NSY7fPJf1g%3a1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Social economics has long been concerned with the effects on human societies of market-coordinated processes of economic innovation. But the social economy also causes invention and innovation, an aspect that has received less attention. This article reviews three new approaches to the study of the growth of knowledge in economic systems as driven expressly by sociocultural mechanisms and dynamics. The first are so-called “social network markets” and “novelty bundling markets”. The second extends from “knowledge commons” to “innovation commons”. The third is a sociocultural semiotic process of group dynamics. These models represent different ways the social economy generates newness and produces innovation.”


POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas


Political Voice and Civic Attentiveness of Public and Non-Profit Employees

Nevbahar Ertas. The American Review of Public Administration, volume 45, issue 5, pages 607-626, September 2015.

http://arp.sagepub.com/content/45/5/607?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The scarcity of citizen involvement in the public sphere is an ongoing concern within the literature on democratic citizenship. This study examines two dimensions of engagement—attentiveness and participation—in several political voice activities, looking at citizens working in the public and non-profit sectors in comparison with private-sector employees. Government employees serve the public interest by providing public services in various ways, but they are also individual citizens with varying values, opinions, and attitudes. How does this dual role shape their civic engagement behaviors and habits of political attentiveness? Are they more politically attentive or more likely to engage in political voice activities than individuals working in other sectors? How do non-profit workers fare? Are they more similar to public workers or private workers with regard to participation in these activities? Using the Current Population Survey (CPS) Special Supplement on civic engagement, the analyses here indicate that both government and non-profit employees are significantly more likely to engage in political voice activities than those working in the private sector. By focusing on political voice activities, knowledge, and media use, the study contributes to the literature by providing a more comprehensive profile of individual participation by sector. The findings generate new questions about what such participation might mean for democratic citizenship. »


Contra Spem Spero: The Third Sector’s Resilience in the Face of Political Turbulence and Legislative Change in Ukraine

Krasynska Svitlana. Nonprofit Policy Forum, volume 6, issue 2, pages 167-186, August 2015.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/npf.2015.6.

issue-2/npf-2014-0003/npf-2014-0003.xml

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The iconic Ukrainian poem, “Contra Spem Spero,” with its theme of resilience in the face of enduring hardships, appears as salient for the Ukrainian people today as when it was composed more than a hundred years ago. Political instability and a far from favorable legislative system have affected Ukraine’s society in a variety of ways since the dissolution of the Soviet Union. How have Ukraine’s nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) been shaped by these conditions? A review of academic and applied literature, as well as governmental reports and legislative texts, reveals that the political and legislative environment in Ukraine is highly unstable and, at times, antagonistic to NGOs. However, indicators of sector activity and interviews with Ukrainian nonprofits suggest that the sector, overall, has not changed significantly during the last decade of substantial political and legislative changes. This paper suggests that Ukrainian nonprofits (much like Ukrainian society in general) appear to exist in a parallel universe with the governmental and legislative world. Ukrainian nonprofits are generally not supported by and are largely independent from the government. The concept of a shadow economy in Ukraine is discussed as a way of understanding how nonprofit organizations continue to function in what is often an adverse policy environment.”


CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones


Perspectives of social economy in Romania

Popescu M.L., M.R. Cosma and A. Predescu. Quality - Access to Success, volume 16, issue 1, pages 587-592, January 2015.

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?

eid=2-s2.0-84939460725&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert

&txGid=C08FD33FE3311A77BFEF47825EC415D5.

FZg2ODcJC9ArCe8WOZPvA%3a1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Social Economy (SE) is a concept broadly debated in European Union in last decade; the debate carried out for so long, not in the least, because concept of ‘Social Economy’ is not at all easy to define. But, as of late, a definition was given, to the effect Social Economy comprises the wide range of economic entities such as cooperatives, mutual benefit societies, associations, foundations and social enterprises – in short, Social Economy Organizations (SEOs) –, which produce goods, services and knowledge whilst striving for social and economic aims and, simultaneously, fostering solidarity in their communities. Development of SEOs is strongly linked to unemployment issue, both in EU and in Romania. Fact is, according to OECD, concept of SE, at least, is little known and emerging, whilst related concepts, such as non-profit sector and nongovernment organizations, are more recognized. At least, this being our ‘square one’, in Romania, SE is a reality at a level from which SE importance could be raised, using a properly articulated strategy, to a level from which Romania’s SE could help revive economic development in Romania – and especially in rural areas (which comprise almost 50% of total population)”.



AUTRES

Other / Otros


Efficiency, stability and the decision to give to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in the United States

Cleopatra Grizzle. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, volume 20, issue 3, pages 226–237, August 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/

nvsm.1521/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Using data from the Cultural Data Project, this study extends the literature by examining the impact of financial disclosure information on donations to arts and culture-related nonprofit organizations in the United States. Results for organization financial stability are for the most part counterintuitive: financially unstable arts and culture-related nonprofits receive more donations. The current analysis supports prior research and finds evidence of a “crowding in” effect for fundraising expenses, suggesting that nonprofits that spend more on fundraising and marketing raise more funds than those that spend less. Additional analysis indicates efficiency matters to donors when it comes to fundraising efforts. As the “cost to raise a dollar” increases donations decrease. Nonprofit managers in arts and culture-related organizations concerned about increasing donations should consider strategies that will increase the efficiency of their fundraising and marketing efforts.”


From Social Housing to Subsidized Housing? Accommodating Low-Income Households in Europe

Whitehead M.E. Christine. Built Environment, volume 41, issue 2, pages 244-257, July 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/alex/

benv/2015/00000041/00000002/art00009

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: There were three main models of social housing in post-war Europe: state housing as part of the communist offer; social rented housing as a pillar of the welfare or corporate state; and (limited) support for self-provision and owner-occupation in more rural family based systems. Within the welfare state model there have been two distinct approaches: housing available to all and housing concentrated on accommodating lower income households. As incomes rose, numerical shortages were overcome, public expenditure cuts kicked in and there was political upheaval in many countries, models of social housing also changed –becoming more diverse within countries but increasingly similar across much of Europe. This article first tracks changes over the post-war period to provide a backdrop for discussing how the ways that social sectors have been financed have changed and the relative role of supply and demand side subsidies. It then asks who is now living in social housing to address the question of whether social housing has now become a residual tenure as other more desirable options have become available or whether it still plays a positive and innovative role”.


Building the Social Structure of a Market

Kevin McKague, Charlene Zietsma and Christine Oliver. Organization Studies, volume 36, issue 8, pages 1063-1093, August 2015.

http://oss.sagepub.com/content/36/8/1063.full.pdf+html