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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 12, NUMÉRO 10, 0CTOBRE 2017

Pour le format PDF, cliquer ici!

TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Diversity, Trust, and Social Learning in Collaborative Governance

From Silent to Salient Stakeholders: A Study of a Coffee Cooperative and the Dynamic of Social Relationships

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Benefits and Drivers of Nonprofit Revenue Concentration

Impact of the EU Structural Funds on Financial Capacities of Non-profit Organizations

The Role of Global Food Banks as an Alternative, Non-Profit Business Model: Advancing Peace, Alleviating Food Insecurity and Contributing to Global Sustainability

Do Nonprofits Manipulate Investment Returns?

A Comparative Analysis of the Practice and Performance of Microfinance Institutions in Nigeria

Sustainable Development and Microfinance: The Effect of Outreach and Profitability on Microfinance Institutions' Development Mission

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Strategies for Social Media Use in Nonprofits

Social Enterprise Business Sustainability of the Food Banking Model: The Case of Leket Israel, Israel’s National Food Bank.

Nonprofit Pay in a Competitive Market: Wage Penalty or Premium?

Immigrants’ Employment in Spanish Cooperatives: Outcomes in Relation to the Business Cycle

Rethinking Nonprofit Commercialization: The Case of the Czech Republic

Elements of Capacity in Youth Development Nonprofits: An Exploratory Study of Urban Sport for Development and Peace Organizations

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Valorisation des savoir-faire productif et stratégies de développement territorial: patrimoine, mise en tourisme et innovation sociale

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

The Social Economy as Produced Space: The ‘here and now’ of Education in Constructing Alternatives

The Contribution of Food Banks to Social Solidarity and Positive Peace: The Italian Case

Autres

Other / Otros

Learning Alterity in the Social Economy: The Case of the Local Organic Food Co-ops Network in Ontario, Canada

Explaining Participation in the Informal Economy: a Purchaser Perspective

Third Sector Organizations and Migration: A Systematic Literature Review on the Contribution of Third Sector Organizations in View of Flight, Migration and Refugee Crises

La coopération à l’ère du numérique

Varia

Conceptual Framework for the Purpose of Measurement of Cooperatives and its Operationalization

Recent Evolutions of the Social Economy in the European Union

Étude stratégique sur l’économie sociale et solidaire en Tunisie

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Diversity, Trust, and Social Learning in Collaborative Governance

Saba Siddiki, Jangmin Kim and William D. Leach. Public Administration Review, volume 77, issue 6, pages 863-874, November/December 2017.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/puar.12800/full

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Scholarship on collaborative governance identifies several structural and procedural factors that consistently influence governance outcomes. A promising next step for collaborative governance research is to explore how these factors interact. Focusing on two dimensions of social learning—relational and cognitive—as outcomes of collaboration, this article examines potential interacting effects of participant diversity and trust. The empirical setting entails 10 collaborative partnerships in the United States that provide advice on marine aquaculture policy. The findings indicate that diversity in beliefs among participants is positively related to relational learning, whereas diversity in participants' affiliations is negatively related to relational learning, and high trust bolsters the positive effects of belief diversity on both relational and cognitive learning. In addition, high trust dampens the negative effects of affiliation diversity on relational learning. A more nuanced understanding of diversity in collaborative governance has practical implications for the design and facilitation of diverse stakeholder groups.”

 

From Silent to Salient Stakeholders: A Study of a Coffee Cooperative and the Dynamic of Social Relationships

Anabella Davila and Christiane Molina. Business and Society, volume 56, issue 8, November 2017.

https://philpapers.org/rec/MOLFST

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Theoretical and empirical research on stakeholder behavior tends to focus on specific actions or responses in the context of the organization–stakeholder relationship. Despite increased efforts to look beyond the dyadic organization–stakeholder relationship, research still favors the perspective of the focal organization. The taken-for-granted assumption of the organization–stakeholder relationship may limit our understanding of how organization–stakeholder linkages are formed and evolve over time. By adopting the perspective of the stakeholder, this article examines organization–stakeholder relationship formation and tracks changes in the salience of stakeholder groups otherwise considered to be non-stakeholders. This research draws from a case study of small coffee producers in Southern Mexico who formed a cooperative and developed salience within their stakeholder network after a long history of diverse individual, organizational, and institutional arrangements. The findings suggest that the replacement of bureaucratic stakeholder relationships with relationships characterized by strong moral commitment to stakeholders’ claims enabled independent farmers to transform into an integrated, solid, and worldwide competitive group of coffee producers.”

 

 


 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

Benefits and Drivers of Nonprofit Revenue Concentration

Georg von Schnurbein and Tizian M. Fritz. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 46, issue 5, pages, October 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0899764017713876

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Nonprofit organizations (NPO) rely on a diverse mix of revenue sources. The existing literature mainly supports diversification among different revenue sources as desirable because it enables organizational stability. Using a new data set of over 200 Swiss fundraising charities, we prove the opposite to be true: organizations that displayed a higher degree of revenue concentration grew stronger between 2005 and 2012. We identify factors influencing the organization’s capital and revenue structure. These factors can be divided into “nature” and “nurture” factors, which allows us to demonstrate which of them may be actively influenced by an organization’s management and which stem from conditions of the organization that cannot be readily overcome by managerial interventions (such as age, size, and legal form). Revenue concentration is positively influenced both by an organization’s geographical range of activity and dependence on its primary revenue source, and negatively influenced by board size and diversity.

 

Impact of the EU Structural Funds on Financial Capacities of Non-profit Organizations

Oto Potluka, Martin Spacek and Georg von Schnurbein. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 5, pages 2200–2223, October 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s1126
6-017-9845-1?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “To fulfil their role, non-profit organizations (NPOs) need sufficient capacities. These include, first and foremost, financial capacity. EU Cohesion Policy commands financial resources of 351.8 bn. EUR. The EU is also willing to support NPOs from this source. With such considerable funding, the research questions arise: How much money have NPOs received? What are the effects of such assistance on the financial capacities of NPOs? On a sample of 2715 non-profit organizations in the Czech Republic, we have found that EU subsidies have a positive impact on financial capacities, measured as real assets. It is caused by using EU funds for investment. We have not proved an effect on short-term financial capacities measured on revenues. Moreover, the distribution of financial support among PBOs is unequal as 4% of NPOs collected 80% of subsidies due to differences in skills among NPOs’ managers.”

 

The Role of Global Food Banks as an Alternative, Non-Profit Business Model: Advancing Peace, Alleviating Food Insecurity and Contributing to Global Sustainability

H. Eric Schockman and Christopher Rebstock. Business, Peace and Sustainable Development, volume 2017, issue 9, pages 3-6, June 2017.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/glbj
/bpsd/2017/00002017/00000009/art00002

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “As a former US Ambassador to the Republic of South Africa and having served as the Under Secretary of Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services for the United States Department of Agriculture, I am delighted to provide a few of my own words as a foreword to this special edition. First, having been in the public and non-profit sectors for most of my professional life, I am candidly shocked at the dearth of scholarly literature in the field examining the essential role that food banks play in advancing global sustainability, peace and food security around the planet. I strongly believe this special volume will serve as a major contribution and will hopefully spore future research and applied knowledge.”

 

Do Nonprofits Manipulate Investment Returns?

Almond Douglas and Xia Xing.Economics letters, volume 155, issue 1, pages 62-66; January 2017.

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “We provide evidence that nonprofit organizations manipulate reported investment returns to avoid investment losses. We find a sharp discontinuity around zero in cross-sectional distribution of the rates of return on investments for tax-exempt organizations: rates of return are significantly more likely to be slightly positive than slightly negative. This pattern is found for a wide range of nonprofit missions, including religious related charities and community improvement organizations.”

 


 

A Comparative Analysis of the Practice and Performance of Microfinance Institutions in Nigeria

Abiola Ayopo Babajide, Joseph Niyan Taiwo, and Kehinde Adekunle Adetiloye. International Journal of Social Economics, volume 44, issue 11, pages 1522-1538, September 2017.

http://emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/
IJSE-01-2016-0007?journalCode=ijse

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The successful story of microfinance institutions is often tied to the practice and methods of credit delivery as evidence among international world class microfinance institutions across the globe. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of practice and methods of credit delivery employed by “non- profit” and “for-profit” microfinance institutions on financial sustainability and outreach programmes of the microfinance institutions in Nigeria. The study adopts the survey research design and multi-stage stratified random sampling procedure to collect data from 372 senior management staff, managing directors and board members of microfinance institutions of both groups in Nigeria. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regressions analysis. The findings suggest that the current practice and methods of credit delivery of microfinance in both “non-profit” and “for-profit” microfinance institutions have an inverse relationship with the financial sustainability and outreach programmes of the institutions. This study provides empirical evidence for the incessant failure of microfinance institutions in Nigeria. The study therefore recommends an immediate overhaul of the methodology and practice of microfinance institutions in the country to align with international best practice. In spite of the huge literature on microfinance in Nigeria, there is not enough evidence to empirically prove that the practice of microfinance has affected the performance of the industry in Nigeria. This study sets out to fill that gap in the literature. The paper examines the practice of microfinancing in Nigeria vis-à-vis the performance of the microfinance institutions, categorized into NGO and microfinance bank “for-profit” institutions using international best practices from countries where microfinance is highly successful as a benchmark for deployment of microfinance in Nigeria, in order to proffer policy direction to stakeholders on steps to take to ensure viability in the microfinance subsector in Nigeria.”

 

Sustainable Development and Microfinance: The Effect of Outreach and Profitability on Microfinance Institutions' Development Mission

Kerstin Lopatta, Magdalena Tchikov, Reemda Jaeschke and Sumit Lodhi.  Sustainable Development, volume 25, issue 5, pages 386-399, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sd.1663/full 

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “According to the concept of microfinance, financial institutions ought to contribute to sustainable economic and financial systems development by offering access to credit for clients who are usually excluded from the formal banking system. However, in recent decades microfinance institutions (MFIs) have often focused on their profitability rather than the support of their poor clients. In order to empirically examine this mission drift and its consequences for MFIs' performance, we propose a model of MFIs' contribution to sustainable development as dependent on their outreach and profitability focus measured by percentages of female borrowers and profit margins, respectively. Utilizing a large transnational panel data set comprised of institutional and country-specific data, we provide preliminary empirical evidence indicating that both extensive outreach and profitability are negatively related to development. The model further highlights that the problem of a mission drift is especially pronounced for non-profit-oriented MFIs.”

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Strategies for Social Media Use in Nonprofits

Katherine Milde and Robert M. Yawson. Journal of Management Policy and Practice, volume 18, issue 1, pages 19-27, June 2017.

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3002552

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The aim of this paper is to detail the social media engagement efforts used by successful nonprofits and to build on these insights in developing recommendations for effective social media plans to increase the visibility and service areas of public service organizations. The topic of social media use by nonprofits is viewed through a practice lens. Specific campaign activities for becoming distinguished nonprofits are identified. Essential aspects of social media engagement initiatives that translate into public service activities include tying online effort to the mission of the organization, providing for a dedicated person or team to ensure pointed social media efforts integrated into existing strategies, and developing a cost analysis coupled with benchmarks for success. Incorporating the recommendations detailed in this paper may help to expand the reach of otherwise resource-limited public service organizations, and can foster the transition from merely having supporters on paper to working with engaged, committed, and informed volunteers and donors.”

 

Social Enterprise Business Sustainability of the Food Banking Model: The Case of Leket Israel, Israel’s National Food Bank.

Joseph Gitler, Gidi Kroch, Jacob Bellinsky and Deena Fiedler. Business, Peace and Sustainable Development, volume 2017, issue 9, pages 76-93, June 2017.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/glbj/
bpsd/2017/00002017/00000009/art00008

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:In many countries, food banking is a central and longstanding model designed to rescue surplus food for redistribution to those in need as a means of alleviating hunger and nutritional insecurity—a problem that has plagued Israel’s citizens for decades. In the following article, we set out to describe the key principles of operational sustainability worthy of consideration for food banks and other non-profits using Leket Israel’s experience as a guide. The principles described within this article include: 1) financial sustainability (an organization’s finances or long-term financial strength and fundraising capacity); 2) food availability and sourcing (market share; the quantity of surplus food and its potential availability for rescue and redistribution); 3) business model/activities (operating according to the principles of a for-profit business with clearly defined goals, metrics and benchmarks etc.); and 4) focus/agenda (staying true to the organization’s vision, mission and target clientele). Food banks that employ the principles outlined in this chapter we hope will improve their capacity and long-term service delivery to their beneficiaries, while realizing a plethora of economic, social and environmental benefits for their regions of the world.”

 

Nonprofit Pay in a Competitive Market: Wage Penalty or Premium?

Christian King and Gregory B. Lewis. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 46, issue 5, October 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0899764017718633

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Two competing theories argue that the nonprofit sector pays differently: Nonprofit employees may accept lower pay to be able to do meaningful work for a good cause, or they may earn higher pay due to nonprofit organizations’ tax exemptions and weaker incentives to hold down wages. To test these opposing expectations, we use the 2005-2013 American Community Surveys to examine pay differences among registered nurses working for nonprofit, for-profit, and public hospitals. We also test hypotheses that public and nonprofit hospitals have smaller pay disparities by gender, race, and relationship status. We find that pay is highest in nonprofit hospitals, partly because they attract better-educated and more experienced nurses, but partly because they pay comparable nurses more than for-profit hospitals do. Furthermore, contrary to expectations, pay disparities appear to be largest in nonprofit hospitals.”

 

Immigrants’ Employment in Spanish Cooperatives: Outcomes in Relation to the Business Cycle

Mercè Sala-Rios, Mariona Farré-Perdiguer and Teresa Torres-Solé. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 5, pages1940-1961, September 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-
016-9817-x?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “In this paper, we analyse the interaction between immigrants’ employment in cooperatives and the business cycle. The study is centred on the Spanish economy during the period 2003–2015. The main goal of this paper is to answer the following two key questions: are fluctuations in immigrants’ employment in cooperatives cyclical in relation to the business cycle? And, are immigrant employees more vulnerable to the business cycle than native employees? The cycles and their turning points are identified using the Bry and Boschan (Cyclical analysis of time series: selected procedures and computer programmes, National Bureau of Economic Research, New York, 1971) algorithm. To resolve it we employ the BUSY software, developed by the European Commission. The procedure allows us to identify the features of the cycle phases and to calculate the synchronization index. The results show that (1) employment in cooperatives is procyclical and with no differences between immigrant and native workers, (2) the economic crisis has hit immigrant workers harder than native ones, (3) the immigrants’ birthplace is significant because some cyclical behaviour can be found to vary according to the immigrants’ origins; however, in general, sensitivity to the business cycle is the common factor.”

 

Rethinking Nonprofit Commercialization: The Case of the Czech Republic

Gabriela Vaceková, Vladislav Valentinov  and Juraj Nemec. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations. October 2017, volume 28, issue 5, pages 2103 - 2123, September 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-016-9772-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Some nonprofit economists tend to see nonprofit commercialization as a moral dilemma because commercial activities may secure organizational survival at the cost of undermining the mission orientation. The present paper argues that this type of moral framing of the commercialization debate is hardly adequate for the transitional context of the Czech nonprofit sector which is still struggling to develop its distinct institutional identity. Given that financial independence is part of this identity, commercial activities help nonprofits to emancipate themselves from the state that used to be paternalistic in the past. On this basis, the paper underscores the institutional nature of the commercialization phenomenon in the Czech Republic. Commercialization decisions of Czech nonprofit managers are shown to be heavily influenced by the current institutional and regulatory environment that explicitly promotes nonprofit self-financing initiatives. If nonprofit commercialization is understood as an institutional phenomenon, then its moral significance is best captured in terms of institutional ethics rather than individual ethics of nonprofit managers which seems to be predominant in the Anglo-Saxon literature. After presenting the recent empirical findings on self-financing, the paper concludes by stressing the interrelation between the semantic and ethical aspects of the commercialization concept.”

 

Elements of Capacity in Youth Development Nonprofits: An Exploratory Study of Urban Sport for Development and Peace Organizations

Per G. Svensson, Meg G. Hancock  and Mary A. Hums. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, Vol. 28, Issue 5, pages 20153- 2080, September 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-017-9876-7?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Organizational capacity is often discussed among nonprofit practitioners and scholars. Yet, empirical research employing a multidimensional capacity framework remains scarce in the nonprofit literature (Andersson et al. in VOLUNTAS Int J Volunt Nonprofit Organ 27(6):2860–2888, 2016). Using a qualitative research approach, we explored capacity in a specific segment of youth development nonprofits—sport for development and peace (SDP). We were guided by three research questions: (1) what are critical capacity elements of SDP nonprofits? (2) how do these capacity elements influence the ability of SDP nonprofits to achieve their desired goals and objectives? and (3) what are the capacity needs of SDP nonprofits in the USA? Findings from in-depth interviews with leaders of 29 organizations contribute to the development of theory on nonprofit capacity by providing a more nuanced understanding of capacity strengths and challenges related to broader nonprofit goal achievement. For example, paid staff, revenue generation, and internal infrastructure emerged as critically more important for capacity in this context. Practical and theoretical implications are further discussed.”

 

 

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

 

Valorisation des savoir-faire productif et stratégies de développement territorial: patrimoine, mise en tourisme et innovation sociale

Jean-Baptiste Grison et Laurent Rieutort (sous la direction). Presses universitaires Blaise-Pascal, 180 pages, mai 2017.

https://www.tourisme-espaces.com/doc/9829.valorisation-
savoir-faire-productifs-strategies-developpement-territorial.html

Résumé issu du l’URL ci-haut : « De nombreux territoires abritent des productions spécifiques et des savoir-faire originaux, anciens ou contemporains, qui contribuent aux identités locales. Ces savoir-faire productifs, en activités, sont ainsi valorisables au-delà de leur rôle économique de production. Ils sont de plus en plus identifiés comme des éléments du patrimoine local, et deviennent parfois incontournables de l’image des territoires où ils se sont développés. Ils sont parfois mis en tourisme (visite d’entreprises, muséification), générant ainsi une ressource complémentaire à la seule vente des produits.  Les savoir-faire productifs s’inscrivent ainsi dans des stratégies potentielles de développement territorial, que cet ouvrage s’attache à décrypter, à travers une douzaine d’exemples, en France, Italie, Afrique du Nord et Mexique, mis en perspectives. Il s’agit de mettre en évidence, de l’identification au projet de territoire, des trajectoires de valorisation et d’innovation plurielles, à la croisée de problématiques économiques, sociales ou touristiques. »

 

 

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

 

The Social Economy as Produced Space: The ‘here and now’ of Education in Constructing Alternatives

Brown, S. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, volume, issue 2, pages 261-275, September 2017.

http://www.rela.ep.liu.se/issues/10.3384_rela.2000
-7426.201682/9095/rela_9095.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This article approaches adult learning within the social economy through a critical and spatial lens. First, I approach the critical pedagogy of Freire, outlining the dialectical relationship between subjectivity and objectivity enacted in the development of critical consciousness. Carrying this dialogical argumentative forward, I go on to show how the critical geography of Lefebvre ‘unpacks’ this dialectic onto space and place, grounding pedagogical apprehension in a critical geography which is more directly set up to confront and engage with capitalism as a spatial force. Drawing from some of the social enterprise literature, I then utilise Lefebvre’s ‘spatial triad’ to demonstrate how the perceived, conceived and lived facets of space can shed light on integrative areas of adult learning that together constitute a platform for a potential ‘trial by space’ for alternatives.”

 

The Contribution of Food Banks to Social Solidarity and Positive Peace: The Italian Case

Giancarlo Rovati. Business, Peace and Sustainable Development, volume 27, issue 9, pages 65-75, June 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/glbj/bpsd
/2017/00002017/00000009/art00007

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Food banks (FB) are non-profit organizations specializing in the daily recovery of safe and nutritious surplus food generated in the agri-food supply chain and redistributing it to charitable organizations that assist persons and households in need. In Europe 271 FBs are currently working in 23 countries, associated to FEBA (Fédération Européene des Banques Alimentaires). The italian network was established in 1989 by Fondazione Banco Alimentare Onlus and today supports thousands of non-profit organizations that every day help poor people to extend access to food security. To fulfill its solidarity objectives, the Italian Food Bank Network (FBN) organizes also a National Food Collecting Day, when millions of people donate food while shopping for their groceries. The experience of the FBN is an example of social innovation, which contributes to promote social solidarity and positive peace. The article uses information from administrative sources, connected to the ordinary activities of the FBN, as well as a set of data from a survey of a sample of non-profit organizations affiliated with the 21 regional FB’s.”

 

 

Autres

Other / Otros

 

Learning Alterity in the Social Economy: The Case of the Local Organic Food Co-ops Network in Ontario, Canada

Sumner, J. and C. Wever. European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, volume 8, issue 2 pages 195-206, September 2017.

http://www.rela.ep.liu.se/issues/10.3384_rela.2000
-7426.201682/9093/rela_9093.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “While the origins of the social economy date long before the period of industrialization or the modern state (Shragge & Fontan, 2000), it is growing in importance as we find ourselves in ‘the cancer stage of capitalism’ (McMurtry, 2013). Facing issues such as exponentially growing inequality, the demise of rural communities, an exploding obesity epidemic and jobless recoveries from repeated financial crises, more and more people are turning to the social economy for solutions to their problems (see McMurtry, 2010; Mook et al. 2010). This paper reports on a pilot study that focused on the Local Organic Food Coops Network, created by people who oppose the industrial food system and want to specialize in local, organic food. Adopting a political economy lens to understand this opposition through the words of participants, the study employed semi structured interviews to explore the learning dimensions of this social economy organization. The study found that respondents participated in social learning and learned alterity in the social economy. The paper concludes that social economy organizations need to prioritize social over economic values, and the potential for change associated with social learning is key to making this choice.”

 

Explaining Participation in the Informal Economy: a Purchaser Perspective

Colin C. Williams, Ioana Alexandra Horodnic and Jan Windebank. International Journal of Social Economics, volume 44, issue 11, pages 1421-1436, September 2017.

http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/100828/

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Participation in the informal economy has been predominantly explained from a supply-side perspective by evaluating the rationales for people working in this sphere. Recognising that many transactions in the informal economy are often instigated by customers, exemplified by purchasers asking “how much for cash?, the aim of this paper is to explain the informal economy from a demand-side perspective by evaluating citizens‟ rationales for making purchases in the informal economy. Here, we test three potential explanations for acquiring goods and services in the informal economy, grounded in rational economic actor, social actor and formal economy imperfections theoretical perspectives. To do this, a 2013 Eurobarometer survey, involving 27,563 face-to-face interviews conducted in 28 European Union member states is reported. The finding is that all three rationales apply but the weight given to each varies across populations. A multinomial logit regression analysis then pinpoints the specific groups variously using the informal economy to obtain a lower price, for social or redistributive rationales, or due to the failures of the formal economy in terms of the availability, speed and quality of provision. The outcome is to reveal that the policy approach of changing the cost/benefit ratios confronting purchasers will only be effective for those purchasers citing a lower price as their prime rationale. Different policy measures will be required for those making informal economy purchases due to the shortcomings of the formal economy, and for social ends. These policy measures are then discussed. The value and originality of this paper is that it explains participation in the informal economy from a purchaser, rather than the predominant supplier, perspective.”

 

Third Sector Organizations and Migration: A Systematic Literature Review on the Contribution of Third Sector Organizations in View of Flight, Migration and Refugee Crises

Michael Garkisch, Jens Heidingsfelder and Markus Beckmann. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, October 2017, volume 28, issue 5, pages 1839–1880, September.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-017
-9895-4?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Long before the current refugee crisis, third sector organizations (TSOs) have played a pivotal role in dealing with the multifaceted challenge of migration. Researchers have analyzed this role in many ways. What is missing, however, is a comprehensive overview of how the third sector contributes to dealing with migration. To close this gap, we conduct a systematic literature review (SLR) that maps the scholarly debate on TSOs and migration. Our SLR identifies four domains of TSO migration engagement: first, the direct provision of basic services and social welfare; second, migrant-oriented capacity development; third, system-oriented advocacy; and fourth, complementary research activities. We propose a conceptual framework that highlights the contribution of TSOs with regard to individual-oriented and system-oriented services that are necessary for a successful integration of migrants. A key implication of our derived framework is to understand migration as a holistic challenge that requires contributions by different actors on different levels, thus highlighting the need for coordination and communication between the TSOs, the state and other stakeholders.”

 

La coopération à l’ère du numérique

Anne-Marie Laulan (sous direction). Editions L’Harmattan, 216 pages, août 2017.

http://www.editions-harmattan.fr/index.asp?navig=
catalogue&obj=livre&no=54190

Résumé issue du l’URL ci-haut: “L'époque sociale et politique appelle au changement : les termes en vogue sont "révolution" plutôt que réforme, "insoumission" préféré à aménagements. Qu'en est-il de la 4e révolution annoncée, celle de la numérisation scientifique, administrative, englobant tous les champs de l'action politique au sens originel du terme ? Ce livre procède d'une interrogation précise sur des domaines particuliers : le monde de l'entreprise, le monde des relations interpersonnelles, pour s'achever sur des transformations observées. »

 

 

Varia

 

Conceptual Framework for the Purpose of Measurement of Cooperatives and its Operationalization

Marie J. BouchardMadeg Le Guernic and Damien Rousselière. International Labour Office, October 2017.

http://www.ilo.org/global/topics/cooperatives/publications
/WCMS_578683/lang--en/index.htm

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This report presents a general overview of how cooperatives and key concepts are measured for statistical purposes. It is based on extant work and literature. The first part of the report reviews the most important statistical studies on cooperatives. Conceptual and methodological issues are identified concerning the identification and classification of cooperatives, including a discussion about core components and boundary areas. The report then proposes a conceptual framework for defining and classifying cooperatives for measurement purposes.”

 

Recent Evolutions of the Social Economy in the European Union

Jose Luis Monzón and Rafael Chaves. Rapport produit par le Centre international de recherches et d'information sur l'économie publique, sociale et coopérative, 124 pages, 2017.

http://www.eesc.europa.eu/sites/default/
files/files/qe-04-17-875-en-n.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The general objective of the Report is to study the recent evolution of the social economy (SE) in the European Union (UE) and its 28 member states. It focuses in three areas: firstly, the social economy and the emergent concepts/movements related to the space between states and market/for profit businesses, secondly, the public policies in their large sense built both at the EU and the Member countries in recent years to enhance the social economy sector and thirdly, measuring the weight of the social economy in each EU Member country. This research is not only an update of the studies entitled “The Social Economy in the European Union”, carried out by CIRIEC and published in 2008 and in 2012 by the European Economic and Social Committee, but also an analysis and assessment of recent evolution in this field in Europe. In order to provide answers to the research topics, the project was structured around three areas. In the first, the conceptual area, the research undertook an overview of the emergent concepts, comparing them with the established EU concept of the social economy and identifying their challenges.”

 

Étude stratégique sur l’économie sociale et solidaire en Tunisie

Étude commandée par le Gouvernement tunisien avec l'appui du Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement, 33 pages, septembre 2017.

http://www.mdici.gov.tn/wp-content/uploads/2017
/09/Rapport-Etude-Strategique-ESS_Resume.pdf

Résumé issu du l’URL ci- haut : « cette étude a été commandée par le Gouvernement tunisien avec l'appui du Programme des Nations Unies pour le Développement : Pourquoi l’économie sociale et solidaire est-elle un choix stratégique pour le gouvernement ? - Que représente-t-elle ? (Actuellement, son poids est faible : 0,6 % de la population active et 1 % du PIB). Que faire face aux multiples contraintes et blocages? Pour répondre à ces interrogations, l’étude présente un plan d’action ambitieux. »

 

 

 

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

 

 

®       Entre-prendre et Partage: Quel potentiel de transformation sociale ?  7èmes Journées Georges Doriot - Entrepreneuriat et Société organisées par HEC Paris, EM Normandie et ESG UQAM. Montréal, Québec, Canada, 15-17 mai 2018. Date limite pour soumission: 21 novembre 2017. (Rappel)

 

®        Civil Society Organizations: the Site of Legitimizing the Common Good. Call for papers for the special issue of Voluntas. Deadline for submission: 30th November, 2017. (RECALL)

 

®        Stratégies d’Innovation Sociale et Dynamique d’Initiatives Entrepreneuriales. Séminaire permanent du Réseau de recherche sur l’innovation. 15 et 16 février 2018, France. Date limite pour soumission: 4 décembre 2017.

 

®        L’économie publique, sociale et coopérative dans la révolution numérique. 32ème congrès du CIRIEC International.  Du 30 mai au 1 juin 2018. Liège, Belgique. Date limite pour soumission: 15 décembre 2017. (RECALL)

 

®      Management et modèle coopératif. Numéro spécial de la Revue Française de Gestion. Date limite pour soumission: 15 décembre 2017.

 

®      Management et modèle coopératif. Appel à contributions de la Revue Française de Gestion. Date limite pour soumission: 17 décembre 2017. (RECALL)

 

®      Modernité des idées et pratiques fondatrices de l’économie sociale et solidaire. Colloque du RIEUSS organisé par Laboratoire interdisciplinaire de Recherches en Innovations Sociétales  – LiRI. Du 16 au 18 mai, 2018. Rennes, France, Date limite pour soumission: 22 janvier 2018.

 

®      Social Enterprise and Networks. Special issue of the Social Enterprise Journal. Deadline for submission:  January 24th, 2018. (RECALL)

 

®      6th EACB Award for Young Researchers on Co-operative Banks. Competition for best papers in the field of co-operative banks is announced by the European Association of Co-operative Banks (EACB), in collaboration with its Academic Think-Tank. Deadline for the submissions: 31st January 2018. (RECALL)

 

®      Entrepreneurship in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors. Call for Papers for a Symposium of Public Administration Review. Deadline for submission: May 1st, 2018. (RECALL)

 

 

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 

®      Histoire de la coopération : expériences et pratiques. Trois journées d’études organisées par Le centre Georges Chevrier de l'université de Bourgogne autour des pratiques et des expériences des entreprises coopératives. Entre juin 2017 et février 2018, Dijon, Paris. (RECALL)

 

®       Économie sociale et solidaire: L’efficacité nouvelle. Appel à contributions lancé par ESS Forum International à l’occasion du 8èmes Rencontres du Mont-Blanc. 6 au 8 décembre 2017, Archamps, Grand Genève Français.

®      Comparing Third Sector Expansions. 15th Annual JCPA and ICPA-Forum Workshop. 20 and 21 November, New York, USA. (RECALL)

®      Social and Solidarity Economy, Sustainability and Innovation: facing former and new social issues. 6th CIRIEC International Research Conference on Social Economy. 29th November - 2nd December, 2017. Manaus, Brazil. (RECALL)

 

®      Global Challenges and Sustainability in the Asia Pacific: The Role of the Third Sector. Tenth Asia Pacific Regional Conference of the International Society for Third Sector Research (ISTR). December 4th -5th, 2017. Jakarta, Indonesia. (RECALL)

 

®      5ème Journée Internationale de Recherche sur la Gestion des Entreprises Sociales et Solidaires (GESS). 7 et 8 décembre 2017, Reims. (Rappel)

®      Beyond Boundaries? Organisations, Systems and Social Innovation. The ninth annual International Social Innovation Research Conference (ISIRC 2017) organized in partnership with SIERC and EMES. 12th - 14th December, 2017, Melbourne, Australia. (RECALL)

 

®        Le contrôle de gestion des organisations à but non lucratif. 10ème Journée d’étude en contrôle de gestion (JECG). 2 février 2018, IAE de Tours, France. (RECALL)

 

®      Représenter les territoires. 4e colloque du Collège international des sciences du territoire (CIST). 22 et 23 mars 2018, Rouen, France. (Rappel)

 

®      Organizing for resilience: Organizations and Social Innovation. 7th Latin America and European Meeting on Organizations Studies (LAEMOS).  22nd - 24th March 2018, Buenos Aires, Argentine. (RECALL)

®       Don, associations et économie solidaire en Kabylie. Colloque International Interdisciplinaire. 7 et 8 avril 2017, Tizi-Ouzou, Algérie. (Rappel)

 

®       Democracy and Legitimacy:  The Role of the Third Sector in a Globalizing World. Thirteenth International Conference of the International Society for Third Sector Research (ISTR). 10th-13th July, 2018. Amsterdam, the Netherlands. (RECALL)

 

 

 

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