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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 10, NUMÉRO 10, OCTOBRE 2015

Pour le format PDF, cliquer ici!

TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Public, For-Profit, and Nonprofit Welfare Institutions in Norway: Distinctive Goals and Steering Mechanisms or Hybridity in a Dominant State

Better Safe Than Sorry: Nonprofit Organizational Legitimacy and Cross-Sector Partnerships

Collaborative Governance and Public Innovation in Northern Europe (book)

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

The role of social enterprises in shaping social bonds

Indigenous Cooperatives in Canada: The Complex Relationship between Cooperatives, Community Economic Development, Colonization, and Culture

Las Finanzas solidarias en algunos paises de América: hacia un systema y un ecosystema de economia social y solidaria? (Libro)

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Performance Accountability as a Driver for Changes in Nonprofit–Government Relationships: An Empirical Insight from Austria

Measuring Social Return on Investment

Que « produit » l’entreprise d’économie sociale ?

Nonprofit Performance: Accounting for the Agency of Clients

Gestion

Management / Gestión

L’évolution des logiques coopérative et de marché dans les coopératives agricoles françaises. Le cas de Champagne Céréales

Factores clave en la creación y desarrollo de cooperativas. Estudio empírico aplicado a la comunidad valenciana

Managing Hybridity in a Changing Welfare Mix: Everyday Practices in an Entrepreneurial Nonprofit in Belgium

Organizational Capacity and Organizational Ambition in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sports Clubs

Explaining Collaboration and Commitment in Danish Non-Profit Organizations: Linking Institutional Environments to Outcomes

From “virtuous” to “pragmatic” pursuit of social mission

Managerial Economics of Non-Profit Organizations (book)

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Board of Directors and Innovation in Nonprofit Organizations Model: Preliminary Evidence from Nonprofit Organizations in Developing Countries

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Welfare Mix as a Contested Terrain: Political Positions on Government–Non-profit Relations at National and Local Levels in a Social Democratic Welfare State

The transfer of local authority school support services to external social enterprises

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Understanding Nonprofit Organizations (book)

La empresa social. Experiencias innovadoras a través del deporte

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Las competencias de emprendimiento social, COEMS: aproximación sobre los programas de formación universitaria en Iberoamérica

Austerity and the Third Sector in Greece: Civil Society at the European Frontline

Everyday Discourses of Support and Resistance: The Case of the Australian Social Housing Initiative

Addressing Limits to Mainstream Economic Analysis of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations: The “Austrian” Alternative

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

The Cooperative Advantage for Community Development

Social Economics in Poland

Serving the General Interest with Public Enterprises New Forms of Governance and Trends in Ownership

VARIA

Les Capteurs d’innovation sociale

Panorama de l’économie sociale et solidaire à Genève : étude statistique 2015

Key findings from the Northern Rock Foundation: Third Sector Trends Study in North East England

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos


ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes


Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general


Public, For-Profit, and Nonprofit Welfare Institutions in Norway: Distinctive Goals and Steering Mechanisms or Hybridity in a Dominant State

Håkon Dalby Trætteberg. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 1620-1638, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11
266-015-9565-3?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Nonprofit, public, and for-profit welfare institutions have different operational logics. The distinctiveness of a nonprofit institution is more prominent in some circumstances than in others. This paper is based on case studies conducted in Norwegian municipalities to understand when and why nonprofits operate with distinctive steering mechanisms. Based on the framework of hybrid organizations, I analyze the interaction among institutions in the public sector that have democratic legitimacy through a hierarchical organization, the for-profit sector that seeks efficiency to compete in the market, and the nonprofit sector that has civil society logic. The study revealed how more detached demand-driven regulation of nonprofit schools gives them more room to pursue goals different from those of the public sector institutions, which can be contrasted with the supply-driven regulation of nursing homes that have far less room for steering independent of the municipalities. Surprisingly, the results also suggested that small close-knit communities influence institutions in ways that diverge from the hierarchical steering, and that this happens across the sector split. Moreover, regulation and alternative sources of income contribute to making the organization more hybrid, in the sense that the hierarchical steering is challenged.”


Better Safe Than Sorry: Nonprofit Organizational Legitimacy and Cross-Sector Partnerships

Heidi Herlin. Business and Society, volume 54, issue 6, pages 822-856, October 2015.

http://bas.sagepub.com/content/54/6/822?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This article aims to clarify the potential impact of cross-sector partnerships on nonprofit organizational legitimacy and to provide nonprofit organizations (NPOs) with strategic direction on how to approach cross-sector partnerships to avoid running into a legitimacy crisis. Five theoretical propositions are developed based on existing theory on cross-sector partnerships, organizational legitimacy, and identity and are matched with empirical data consisting of 257 survey responses and seven in-depth interviews in a single case study of a Finnish social welfare organization. Results suggest that engagement with companies may threaten NPO legitimacy by challenging core values and identity traits. Due to power asymmetries in favor of the company, the legitimacy risk is particularly serious for integrative partnerships compared with philanthropic and transactional partnerships. This condition is paradoxical, because integrative partnerships are praised for their greater societal impact and ability to generate joint innovations. Safer options include short-term, project-based partnerships managed and controlled by the NPO, except for brand licensing, which is a high-risk option. Regarding partner selection NPOs should select companies with similar values.


Collaborative Governance and Public Innovation in Northern Europe (book)

Annika Agger, Bodil Damgaard, Andreas Hagedorn Krogh, Eva Sørensen. Bentham eBooks Edition, mars 2015.

http://ebooks.benthamscience.com/book/9781681080130/

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Governments all over Northern Europe have placed public innovation high on the political agenda and pursuing public innovation through multi-actor collaboration such as public-private partnerships and governance networks appears to have particular potential. Collaborative Governance and Public Innovation in Northern Europe draws up the emergent field of collaborative public innovation research and presents a series of cutting-edge case studies on collaborative forms of governance and public innovation in Northern Europe. The edited volume offers scholarly reflections, empirical testimonies and learning perspectives on recent transformations of governance and the way in which new public policies, services and procedures are formulated, realized and diffused. Through the empirical case studies, the book discusses some of the wider political and social drivers, barriers, promises and pitfalls of collaborative public innovation initiatives in some European nations. Collaborative Governance and Public Innovation in Northern Europe will stimulate debates among scholars and decision-makers on how new forms of collaborative governance might enhance the capacity for public innovation and help in developing solutions to some of the most acute and wicked governance problems of our time. »



MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento


The role of social enterprises in shaping social bonds 

Rymsza, Marek. International Journal of Social Economics, volume 42, issue 9, pages 830-840, September 2015.

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?eid
=2-s2.0-84941555895&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&txGid=
6C6AF0CC141835F61958986A8EE10CD8.FZg2ODcJC9ArCe8WOZPvA%3a1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of social enterprises in building social capital and strengthening social bonds. The analysis is based on the comparative method. The author compares the development of social entrepreneurship of the "old" social economy (born on the turn of nineteenth and twentieth centuries), and of the "new" social economy (developing on the turn of twentieth and twenty-first centuries); and the functioning of social enterprises of two kinds: work integration social enterprises (WISEs) and community-based social enterprises (CBSEs). Moreover, he distinguishes between economic and social re-integration; and reciprocity and vertical inclusion. The paper presents WISEs and CBSEs as tools of two different activation programmes: WISEs improve the employability of individuals who are marginalized in the labour market, while CBSEs serve as vehicles for the socio-economic development of the marginalized communities and territories. Furthermore, the author clarifies two methods of inclusion: through strengthening horizontal social ties (realized mainly by CBSEs, with their mutuality principle as a basis for building relations between participants) and building vertical social bonds (mainly by WISEs, based on the "inclusion of excluded" formula). The paper stresses the importance of focusing research into social entrepreneurship on the role of social enterprises in shaping social bonds as well as using and producing of social capital of two main types: bonding and bridging. The author argues that the most effective approach (in producing social value-added) is to combine the formula of the re-integration of individuals excluded from the labour market with the efforts to develop the whole local communities from marginalized territories. The author uses sociological perspectives in analysing economic entities and activation policies.”


Indigenous Cooperatives in Canada: The Complex Relationship between Cooperatives, Community Economic Development, Colonization, and Culture

Ushnish Sengupta. Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD), volume 4, issue 1, pages 121-152, August 2015.

http://www.jeodonline.com/articles/indigenous-
cooperatives-canada-complex-relationship-between
-cooperatives-community-economic

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This paper describes the intersection of the cooperative movement and Indigenous communities in Canada. The paper brings a lens of nation and race to an analysis of the cooperative movement in Canada, a perspective that has received limited attention in published literature. Cooperatives have had a dual role in Indigenous communities. The history of Indigenous cooperative development in Canada is inseparable from historical government colonization policies. In the current context, cooperatives have been utilized by Indigenous communities as a tool for economic and social development. Indigenous cooperatives demonstrate innovative combinations of “quadruple bottom line” business approaches, including financial, social, environmental and cultural goals. The extraordinary growth of Indigenous cooperatives in Canada, particularly in Inuit communities in the North, has also been supported by government policy implementation including financial and technical management support. A pan-Arctic comparison of government policies affecting development of cooperatives is provided as counter examples against the hypothesis of “cultural fit” between cooperatives and Indigenous communities. Ultimately, cooperatives are explained as an organizational form that can be co-opted for colonization or decolonization, capitalism or socialism, settler or Indigenous communities for their own specific purposes." 


Las Finanzas solidarias en algunos paises de América: hacia un systema y un ecosystema de economia social y solidaria? (Libro)

Leïla Oulhaj et Benoît Lévesque. Universidad Iberoamecicana Puebla, 268 páginas, mayo 2015.

http://tiendaenlinea.profetica.com.mx/libro/finanzas
-solidarias-en-algunos-paises-de-america-las_976680

Resumen extraído de la URL del libro:Desde hace algunos años aparecen conceptos —cada vez más— en la literatura relacionados con las finanzas que no son comerciales: finanzas alternativas, finanzas solidarias, microfinanzas, finanzas éticas, finanzas de la economía social y solidaria, finanzas participativas, finanzas responsables, bancos solidarios. Estos conceptos reflejan una gran diversidad de innovaciones y también la complejidad a la hora de analizar las múltiples realidades. Así, para entender el porqué de este libro, nos parece fundamental mencionar que una primera pregunta que nos guío en su elaboración tiene que ver con las definiciones mismas: ¿A qué se refieren estos conceptos? ¿Son realmente diferentes entre ellos? ¿En qué aspectos? Sin embargo, es de subrayar que la principal pregunta que nos interesa es la siguiente: ¿Cuál es el lugar ocupado por las finanzas solidarias en la economía social y solidaria? Éste es el corazón de la presente obra. »


La Economía Social y Solidaria en la Historia de América Latina y el Caribe: Cooperativismo, desarrollo comunitario y Estado (Libro)

Valeria Mutuberría Lazarini y Daniel Plotinsky (Ed.) Ediciones Idelcoop, Buenos Aires, 2015.

http://www.idelcoop.org.ar/economia-social-y-solidaria
-historia-america-latina-y-caribe

Resumen extraído de la URL del libro: “Los 43 trabajos publicados en los dos tomos de este libro han sido seleccionados entre el centenar de ponencias presentadas y debatidas en el Congreso Internacional: La Economía Social y Solidaria en la historia de América Latina y el Caribe. Cooperativismo, desarrollo comunitario y Estado, organizado por la Asociación de Historiadores Latinoamericanos y del Caribe (ADHILAC) y el Centro Cultural de la Cooperación Floreal Gorini (CCC), en el marco de la conmemoración del Año Internacional de las Cooperativas. Tomando como punto de partida la calidad y pertinencia de las investigaciones, los artículos se seleccionaron en función de que fueran una muestra representativa de la compleja realidad de las experiencias de la Economía Social y Solidaria en nuestra región, de las diferentes metodologías de abordaje a esas experiencias, y de las visiones y expectativas teóricas respecto al aporte del sector a la realidad socioeconómica nuestraamericana. Se intentó, además, que estuviera representado el más amplio espectro temporal y territorial; en este sentido los trabajos seleccionados cubren más de un siglo de evolución histórica y corresponden a experiencias argentinas (26 artículos), mexicanas (seis artículos), brasileñas (cinco artículos), colombianas (dos artículos), ecuatorianas, venezolanas, españolas y cubanas (un artículo de cada país).”



ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación


Performance Accountability as a Driver for Changes in Nonprofit–Government Relationships: An Empirical Insight from Austria

Dorothea Greiling and Sandra Stötzer. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 5, pages 1690-1717, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-015-9609-8?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: New Public Management (NPM) and follow-up reforms have extended the external accountability duties of nonprofit organizations (NPOs). They are increasingly obliged to demonstrate performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness and to introduce performance measurement systems (PM systems) for this purpose. This is also the case in Austria, a country with a strong (neo-) corporatist tradition. In the field of social services, nonprofit–government relations are now commonly regulated by performance-based contracts (PBCs) entailing specific accountability obligations. We assume that these externally imposed performance accountability demands affect both NPOs’ strategic focus and their relationships to important stakeholders including state authorities, and thereby influence the system of societal governance. Thus, we investigate NPOs’ stakeholder focus, (power) relations between NPOs and public funders and explore to what extent the latter exert influence on PM system development and how nonprofit executives assess the cost–benefit ratio of PM systems imposed on them.


Measuring Social Return on Investment

Michael Moody, Laura Littlepage and Naveed Paydar. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 26, issue 1, pages 19–37, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/
nml.21145/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Strategic decision making and evaluation in philanthropic giving and social investment requires good-quality information about the social impacts of that investment. One way to meet this need is by calculating a social return on investment (SROI) measure, akin to the return on investment (ROI) approach used in business analysis. Despite much buzz in the field, SROI measurements are rarely used, in part because of the complexity of the calculations but also because of a number of thorny and often expensive organizational challenges associated with implementing an SROI process. This article explores these implementation challenges by comparing four social venture organizations in the health care field—two in the Netherlands and two in the United States—that have utilized some sort of SROI measurement. We summarize the SROI process and identify the specific organizational challenges in each case. Lessons learned from this analysis include the value of process versus product and the importance of fitting the type of measurement to the organizational context. We conclude with a summary of best practices for organizations and social investors who might try to make effective use of SROI measures.”


Que « produit » l’entreprise d’économie sociale ?

Sybille Mertens et Michel Marée. CIRIEC Working Papers, CIRIEC N° 2015/05, 24 pages, mai 2015.

http://www.ciriec.ulg.ac.be/fr/telechargements
/WORKING_PAPERS/WP15-05.pdf

Résumé issu de l’URL ci-haut: « Par rapport aux autres producteurs privés de biens et services, l’entreprise sociale se distingue par le fait qu’elle est gérée en fonction d’objectifs non capitalistes, ce qui entraîne des conséquences importantes en matière de quantification de son activité : qu’il s'agisse de générer des indicateurs de gestion (ratios de rentabilité, ratios de structure, ...) ou de créer des statistiques sur le plan macroéconomique, les mesures chiffrées classiques s’avèrent souvent inadaptées à délivrer une appréhension quantitative correcte de ce que produit l’entreprise sociale. Dans cet article, nous montrons que l’évaluation de la production de l’entreprise sociale se heurte, du fait de sa complexité, à un sérieux problème conceptuel et théorique. Nous rappelons d’abord comment la production de l’entreprise sociale est aujourd’hui prise en compte par les conventions de la comptabilité nationale. Nous suggérons ensuite l’introduction de la notion de "production élargie" si l’on veut tenir compte de toutes les dimensions de ce que produit réellement l’entreprise sociale. Nous terminons en montrant que cette production élargie ne peut malheureusement pas faire l’objet d’une mesure monétaire unique, et qu’il convient donc de renoncer à l’idée qu’il soit possible de mesurer la contribution effective de l’entreprise sociale au produit intérieur brut. Aussi, nous plaidons pour une reconnaissance de la complexité de l’activité productive de l’entreprise sociale et nous énonçons des propositions qui soutiennent la mesure de cette production dans un autre cadre que celui de la comptabilité nationale. »


Nonprofit Performance: Accounting for the Agency of Clients

Lehn M. Benjamin and David C. Campbell. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 5, pages 988- 1006, October 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/5/988.full.pdf+html

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Performance is a key concern for nonprofits providing human services. Yet our understanding of what drives performance remains incomplete. Existing outcome measurement systems track the programmatic activities staff complete and the extent to which participants respond in programmatically intended ways. However, clients do not just receive services and respond as intended and staff do not simply complete program activities. Drawing on a data set of 47 interviews with frontline staff in eight human service nonprofits, we show how frontline staff work in a partnership with clients to set an agenda for change and achieve desired results. We call this co-determination work and argue that it represents a critical and often neglected dimension of nonprofit performance.”



Gestion

Management / Gestión


L’évolution des logiques coopérative et de marché dans les coopératives agricoles françaises. Le cas de Champagne Céréales

Xavier Deroy, Maryline Thénot. Revue française de gestion, issue 250, pages 31-47, septembre 2015.

http://www.cairn.info/article.php?ID_ARTICLE=
RFG_250_0031&WT.mc_id=RFG_250

Résumé issu du l’URL ci-haut : « Historiquement et juridiquement, l’institution coopérative s’est constituée autour de valeurs propres représentatives d’une option alternative au capitalisme actionnarial. En 2012, à l’initiative des Nations unies, l’année internationale des coopératives a souligné l’attrait de ce modèle. Objet d’un regain d’attention, la forme coopérative est issue d’une tradition historique repérable dès le XVIIe siècle avec l’association des cordonniers fondée par Bûche. En réaction aux dérives du capitalisme industriel du XIXe siècle, des institutions coopératives dérivées du socialisme promu par Owen, Proudhon ou Fourier, se créèrent et s’étendirent, gagnant même certaines régions des États-Unis, pourtant traditionnellement associées à la prévalence exclusive d’une logique capitaliste de marché (Schneiberg, 2006). La coexistence de ces deux logiques institutionnelles, coopérative et de marché, aux cultures et pratiques spécifiques, constitue la préoccupation centrale de cette recherche. Le concept de logique se réfère à la définition qu’en a donnée l’institutionnalisme. Logique de marché et logique capitaliste seront utilisées indifféremment dans la suite de cet article. Nous examinons en quoi les exigences et les logiques financières présentes peuvent pénétrer les principes qui caractérisent la logique coopérative et sa culture. Pour mieux le comprendre, nous revenons sur les dimensions juridiques spécifiques de la formule coopérative et la manière dont elle organise la participation des coopérateurs à la gouvernance d’un groupe pouvant également comporter des sociétés régies par une logique capitaliste. Dans la ligne de travaux récents (Lounsbury, 2007), cet article montre comment la présence de deux logiques distinctes contribue à nuancer le déterminisme du changement suggéré par les travaux fondateurs du néo-institutionnalisme (DiMaggio et Powell, 1983 ; Scott (de), 2001). »


Factores clave en la creación y desarrollo de cooperativas. Estudio empírico aplicado a la comunidad valenciana

Joan Ramón Sanchis Palacio, Vanessa Campos Climent y Antonia Mohedano SUANES. Revesco, Revista de Estudios Cooperativos, no 119, Tercer Cuatrimestre 2015, pp. 183-207.

http://pendientedemigracion.ucm.es/info/revesco
/txt/REVESCO%20N%20119.7%20Joan%20Ramon%20S
ANCHIS,%20Vanessa%20CAMPOS%20y%20Antonia
%20MOHEDANO.pdf

Resumen proveniente del artículo: “Las empresas cooperativas y de la Economía Social juegan un papel clave en la crisis económica: por una parte porque son empresas más resistentes a la destrucción de empleo y por otra porque su número aumenta durante las fases recesivas. Por este motivo, puede resultar relevante determinar cuáles son los factores que influyen en la creación de este tipo de organizaciones y garantizan su supervivencia a largo plazo. Para ello, en el trabajo se realiza un estudio empírico aplicado a una muestra de cooperativas creadas en la Comunidad Valenciana entre los años 2008 y 2011 (cuatro primeros años de la crisis) con el fin de determinar dichos factores clave a través del uso de la técnica del Perfil estratégico. Los resultados demuestran que este tipo de organizaciones tienen carencias significativas en lo que se refiere a sus habilidades para la capacidad de gestión y de adaptación a los cambios del entorno, en especial en la obtención de financiación y en la profesionalización de su gestión. Por otra parte, sus principales fortaleza son la satisfacción y fidelización de los clientes, la protección del medio ambiente, la mejora de la calidad, la participación de los trabajadores y el clima laboral. Por el contrario, sus principales debilidades son el bajo poder de negociación con sus proveedores, la innovación de los procesos productivos, los niveles de endeudamiento y los costes financieros. Son, por tanto, las áreas de finanzas y de aprovisionamiento las más débiles en las cooperativas, mientras que sus fortalezas residen en sus recursos humanos y en el marketing."


Managing Hybridity in a Changing Welfare Mix: Everyday Practices in an Entrepreneurial Nonprofit in Belgium

Lesley Hustinx and Els De Waele. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 1666-1689, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-015-
9625-8?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article departs from the observation of a widely heralded shift in the governance of welfare, which is claimed to represent a more complex and uncertain institutional environment for third sector organizations (TSOs). It has been argued that hybrid organizations carry innovative potential compared to traditional nonprofits in terms of more effectively or creatively dealing with contradictory pressures from multiple institutional logics. Using a recently developed theory to study nonprofit hybrids, this paper explores the concrete organizational practice of ‘managing hybridity.’ A qualitative study of institutional logics and participant interactions in a purposively sampled ‘post-corporatist’ hybrid TSO in Belgium was conducted. Our analysis first revealed that at the organization-level, our case represented a blended nonprofit hybrid. The particular combination of competing logics, however, put complex demands on staff members, who used three types of coping strategies in their everyday routines. A managerial and service logic prevailed, at the expense of the TSO's participatory and emancipatory mission. Implications of the findings for nascent theorizing on nonprofit hybrids are discussed.”


Organizational Capacity and Organizational Ambition in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sports Clubs

A. L. Balduck, S. Lucidarme, M. Marlier and A. Willem. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 2023-2043, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-014
-9502-x?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This research measures organizational capacity and organizational ambition in nonprofit and voluntary sports clubs. The organizational capacity dimensions of Hall et al.’s (The capacity to serve: A qualitative study of the challenges facing Canada’s nonprofit and voluntary organizations, 2003) multidimensional framework are completed with corresponding dimensions reflecting organizational ambition, and the human resources dimension is further detailed. Each dimension is adapted to be applicable in a sports clubs setting, resulting in the following organizational ambition and capacity dimensions: human resources (board, coaches, volunteers, youth coaches), accommodation, management, financing, and external orientation. Data obtained from a sample of 585 Flemish sports clubs were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis, revealing five types of sports clubs that are labeled ‘ambition,’ ‘coaches,’ ‘volunteers,’ ‘management,’ and ‘accommodation deficiency.’ The findings support the use of a multidimensional framework based on the dimensions organizational capacity and organizational ambition, and the usefulness of distinguishing among four types of volunteers.”


Explaining Collaboration and Commitment in Danish Non-Profit Organizations: Linking Institutional Environments to Outcomes

Malene Thøgersen. Håkon Dalby Trætteberg. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 1639-1665, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-015-9604-0?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The aim of this paper is to shed light on the characteristics and impact of different institutional environments in non-profit welfare provision in Denmark. Based on an analytical framework inspired by the policy fields approach (Stone and Sandfort, 2009), the paper argues that to understand the non-profit sector, it is necessary to take a closer look at the differences and similarities not only across welfare fields, but also across non-profit providers and their public counterparts within the same field. Based on data from case studies on primary schools and nursing homes in two Danish municipalities, a number of explanatory factors are identified and analyzed: Regulative rules, funding issues, norms and expectations, and the degree of competition. Results show important differences in the institutional environment of the two welfare fields, and that these differences have an actual impact on outcomes: Both collaborative activities of welfare providers and organizational commitment among leaders, employees, and users are highly influenced by characteristics of the institutional environment. It is argued that the applied analytical framework can help understand and explain the large variations in non-profit welfare provision across fields, within countries.”



From “virtuous” to “pragmatic” pursuit of social mission

McDonald E. Robert, Weerawardena Jay, Madhavaram Sreedhar, Mort Gillian Sullivan. Management Research Review, volume 38, issue 9, pages 970-991, September 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mcb/mrr
/2015/00000038/00000009/art00003

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The purpose of this paper is to offer a sustainability-based typology for non-profit organizations and corresponding strategies to sustain the mission and/or financial objectives of non-profit organizations. The balance of mission and money, known in the non-profit literature as the double bottom line, is a challenge for professional managers who run non-profits and scholars who study them. Typologies are often used to classify phenomena to improve understanding and bring about clarity. In this paper, non-profit organizations are viewed from a social and fiscal viability perspective, developed from the long standing challenge of balancing mission and money.”


Managerial Economics of Non-Profit Organizations (book)

Marc Jegers. ASP Edition, VUBPRESS Series, third edition, 192 pages, juin 2015.

http://www.aspeditions.be/en-gb/book/MANAGE859G
/managerial-economics-of-non-profit-organisations-marc-jegers.htm

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This is the third edition of a book that was, in 2008, the first to bring together the microeconomic insights on the functioning of non-profit organisations, complementing the wide range of books on the management of non-profit organisations by focusing instead on both theoretical and empirical work. First, definitions of non-profit organisations are considered, after which the economic rationale behind their existence is examined, followed by a study of the demand for them and its implications for their functioning. The final chapters look at the economic idiosyncrasies of non-profit organisations’ management, focusing on the fields of strategic management, marketing, accounting and finance. This book will be perfect for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates engaged in the study of non-profit organisations and managerial economics.”



Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social


Board of Directors and Innovation in Nonprofit Organizations Model: Preliminary Evidence from Nonprofit Organizations in Developing Countries

Kristina Jaskyte. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 1920-1943, September 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-014-
9505-7?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Innovation is critical for nonprofit organizations’ effective response to changing environmental conditions. While the board of directors, which has the ultimately responsibility for leadership and governance of nonprofit organizations, is in a position to facilitate the development of such capacity, theoretical and empirical literature on this link is very limited and originates primarily in developed world countries, limiting its generalizability and usefulness to other national contexts. The author of this article sought to contribute to the growing literature on boards and innovation by (1) discussing potential usefulness of a Western conceptual model—Board of directors and innovation in nonprofit organizations (Jaskyte, Human services as complex organizations, 2012)—to other contexts, more specifically those of developing countries and (2) providing preliminary empirical evidence for the links presented in the model from nonprofit organizations in developing countries. Five representatives of four social service nonprofit organizations in developing countries known for their continuous innovation were interviewed in order to gain some insights into the board’s role in facilitating innovation. While limited, preliminary data provide support for the importance of board attribute and process variables for organization’s capacity for continuous innovation, and suggest that considering cultural contexts when assessing usefulness of established models might be paramount."



POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas


Welfare Mix as a Contested Terrain: Political Positions on Government–Non-profit Relations at National and Local Levels in a Social Democratic Welfare State

Håkan Johansson, Malin Arvidson and Staffan Johansson. Voluntas, International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, Issue 5, pages 1591-1600, September 2015.

   http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-015-
9622-y?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “As welfare states are increasingly challenged and replaced by welfare mix models, new ideas about the functions of non-profit and voluntary organisations (NPVOs) provoke political conflicts that should be reflected in research. This paper explores the significance of political and ideological dimensions to present changes in the Swedish welfare state regarding NPVOs as welfare services providers. Investigating both national and local level, the study addresses political as well as practical implications of the reframing of NPVOs as service providers rather than being associated with a voice function. The article shows extensive differences between national and local levels as contentious ideological cleavages at national level are dormant in local level politics. Variations in the way relations to NPVOs are structured in practice at local level appear related to factors other than political dimensions. The findings support the development of an analytical framework that reflects political dimensions and allow for empirical focus that includes national and local level politics and practices.”


The transfer of local authority school support services to external social enterprises

Hatcher Richard. Journal of Educational Administration & History, volume 47, issue 4, pages 388-413, October 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cjeh
/2015/00000047/00000004/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This paper explores an emerging and largely unresearched sector of the school education market, the transfer of local authority support services to external social enterprises. It locates these new social enterprises as a consequence of government strategies to reduce public spending, shrink local government and create competitive markets in public service provision. Non-profit social enterprises create and occupy a sector of a differentiated market in school support services which is not sufficiently commercially attractive to for-profit companies. The government discourse of these social enterprises as employee-led mutuals is contradicted by their user-led ownership and governance regimes. The analysis offered by this paper is substantiated by a case study, based on interviews and policy documents, of the transfer of the Birmingham local authority's Music and Health Education Services to a social enterprise independent from the city council.”



CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones


Understanding Nonprofit Organizations (book)

Steven J. Ott and Lisa A. Dicke with cases by Kenneth C. Meyer. Westview Press, Third Edition, 350 pages, July 2015.
https://westviewpress.com/books/understanding
-nonprofit-organizations-third-edition/

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Understanding Nonprofit Organizations examines the most important issues that face today’s leaders and managers of nonprofit organizations through the writing of scholars, consultants, and practicing executives. It focuses on governing, leading, and managing nonprofit organizations and how such organizations differ from both the public and private sectors. Each part opens with a framing essay that identifies the central themes and issues and summarizes the significance of the contribution that each piece makes to the development of knowledge in the field. Completely revised and updated, the third edition includes new articles on legal frameworks, philanthropy, managing volunteers and accountability, as well as an original essay on capacity building by Michele Cole. In addition, the third edition now features brand-new case studies adapted by C. Kenneth Meyer specifically for Understanding Nonprofit Organizations—making it an even more student-friendly text for graduate and upper-division undergraduate nonprofit organizations and management survey courses.”


La empresa social. Experiencias innovadoras a través del deporte

Cristina López-Cózar Navarro, Tiziana Priede Bergamani y Javier Del Arco Juan. Revesco, Revista de Estudios Cooperativos, no 119, Tercer Cuatrimestre 2015, pp. 107-131.

http://pendientedemigracion.ucm.es/info/revesco/
txt/REVESCO%20N%20119.4%20Cristina%20LOPEZ,
Tiziana%20PRIEDE%20y%20Javier%20DEL%20ARCO.pdf

Resumen proveniente del artículo: “Dentro del ámbito de la economía social destacan las empresas sociales, las cuales identifican y tratan de solucionar problemas sociales que las administraciones públicas no son capaces de solventar de la manera adecuada. Por su parte, la actual crisis económica ha aumentado las desigualdades sociales y ha provocado un aumento de la pobreza y del riesgo de exclusión social. En este nuevo escenario es donde el emprendimiento social está adquiriendo relevancia, pues es capaz de satisfacer las necesidades no atendidas, ni por las instituciones públicas, ni por el mercado. Respecto a las instituciones públicas, principalmente debido a la falta de recursos, y por lo que se refiere al mercado, por la falta de interés derivada de la escasa rentabilidad económica que presenta este tipo de actividades. La empresa social puede, en este contexto, rentabilizar su actuación social innovadora al dar protagonismo por encima de todo a las personas en lugar del capital. En este sentido, su finalidad social y la reinversión de sus beneficios económicos en su propio objetivo, propician que este tipo de entidades sean idóneas para poder beneficiar a las comunidades en las que están asentadas. Dentro de los ámbitos donde el emprendimiento social puede tener una mayor incidencia se encuentra el deporte. De hecho, a lo largo del presente estudio se pretende poner de manifiesto la importancia y la idoneidad del deporte como ámbito para el desarrollo del emprendimiento social, ya que ambos buscan fines semejantes: la igualdad de oportunidades, la cohesión y la integración entre otros, junto con el logro de una sociedad más equitativa, dentro de un proyecto social responsable en todas sus dimensiones.”


AUTRES

Other / Otros


Las competencias de emprendimiento social, COEMS: aproximación sobre los programas de formación universitaria en Iberoamérica

Nerea Sáenz Bilbao y Ana Luisa López Vélez. Revesco, Revista de Estudios Cooperativos, no 119, Tercer Cuatrimestre 2015, pp. 159-182.

http://pendientedemigracion.ucm.es/info/revesco
/txt/REVESCO%20N%20119.6%20Nerea%20SAE
NZ%20y%20Ana%20Luisa%20LOPEZ.pdf

Resumen proveniente del artículo: “Dentro del ámbito de la economía social destacan las empresas sociales, las cuales identifican y tratan de solucionar problemas sociales que las administraciones públicas no son capaces de solventar de la manera adecuada. Por su parte, la actual crisis económica ha aumentado las desigualdades sociales y ha provocado un aumento de la pobreza y del riesgo de exclusión social. En este nuevo escenario es donde el emprendimiento social está adquiriendo relevancia, pues es capaz de satisfacer las necesidades no atendidas, ni por las instituciones públicas, ni por el mercado. Respecto a las instituciones públicas, principalmente debido a la falta de recursos, y por lo que se refiere al mercado, por la falta de interés derivada de la escasa rentabilidad económica que presenta este tipo de actividades. La empresa social puede, en este contexto, rentabilizar su actuación social innovadora al dar protagonismo por encima de todo a las personas en lugar del capital. En este sentido, su finalidad social y la reinversión de sus beneficios económicos en su propio objetivo, propician que este tipo de entidades sean idóneas para poder beneficiar a las comunidades en las que están asentadas. Dentro de los ámbitos donde el emprendimiento social puede tener una mayor incidencia se encuentra el deporte. De hecho, a lo largo del presente estudio se pretende poner de manifiesto la importancia y la idoneidad del deporte como ámbito para el desarrollo del emprendimiento social, ya que ambos buscan fines semejantes: la igualdad de oportunidades, la cohesión y la integración entre otros, junto con el logro de una sociedad más equitativa, dentro de un proyecto social responsable en todas sus dimensiones.”


Austerity and the Third Sector in Greece: Civil Society at the European Frontline

Jennifer Clarke, Asteris Huliaras, Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos. Ashgate Pub Co, 278 pages, October 2015.

https://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&
title_id=1219171170&edition_id=1219186731&calcTitle=1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Organised civil society in Greece is generally regarded as weak with rankings for associational density, volunteerism and levels of social capital traditionally among the lowest in Europe. Austerity and The Third Sector in Greece explores the context behind the statistics and general perceptions of a society of takers, not givers. Stereotypes of a country living beyond its means have been exacerbated by the Eurozone crisis but, since 2008, there has in fact been a great proliferation of organised civil society initiatives in the country. Has the financial crisis seen a belated awakening of Greek civil society? Offering a broad overview of contemporary civil society in Greece this book explores how various characteristics of the country's socio-political context have affected the development of the third sector and examines the effect of the economic crisis on it. Expert contributors combine macro-level analyses with local case studies to form a fascinating new study on the influences of national and regional context on civil society development. Their findings provide not only for a better understanding of similar movements, but also contribute to wider academic debates on societal responses to economic crises. »


Everyday Discourses of Support and Resistance: The Case of the Australian Social Housing Initiative

Ruming Kristian. Housing, Theory and Society, volume 32, issue 4, pages 450-471, October 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg
/shou/2015/00000032/00000004/art00006

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Discourse analysis has a long history in housing studies and is used to explore the role of language in determining meaning and power in the urban policy field. This study explores the competing discourses used to frame new social housing construction in Australia under the Social Housing Initiative, introduced as part of the National Building Economic Stimulus Plan. Drawing on interviews with stakeholders (n = 152) conducted at 21 developments, discourse analysis reveals a series of discursive themes used to represent, support and challenge new social housing provision. Negative, mixed and positive discourses emerge – “Housing Commission” as negative; “public”/“social” housing as mixed; “community” housing as more positive. Each discourse provides a unique representation of the sociocultural, physical or economic values of social housing. The language used reflects the dominant status of home ownership in Australia and the extent to which each of these discursive groupings differ from or align with the ideal of home ownership. While failing to dislodge the powerful status of home ownership, it revealed how the mobilization of discourses which align social housing with the dominant ownership discourse might offer an opportunity for addressing tenure- and place-based stigmatization.”


Addressing Limits to Mainstream Economic Analysis of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations: The “Austrian” Alternative

Paul Dragos Aligica. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 5, pages 1026-1040, October 2015.