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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 11, NUMÉRO 5, MAI 2016

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations

When Stakeholder Representation Leads to Faultlines. A Study of Board Service Performance in Social Enterprises

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Social capital, household income, and community development in Bhutan: a case study of a dairy cooperative

Community Variation in the Financial Health of Nonprofit Human Service Organizations: An Examination of Organizational and Contextual Effects

Social reporting and voluntary disclosure in Italian Credit Cooperative Banks

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Measures of Performance in the Context of International Social Ventures: An Exploratory Study

The impact of coopetition-based open innovation on performance in nonprofit sports clubs

The Development of a Measurement Instrument for the Organizational Performance of Social Enterprises

Accountability Standards for Nonprofit Organizations: Do Organizations Benefit from Certification Programs?

Indicators and metrics for social business: a review of current approaches

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Exploring Expectations of Nonprofit Management Capabilities

Exploring what nonprofit branding can learn from contemporary art

Applying Delphi method for strategic design of social entrepreneurship

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

What is the Social Innovation Community? Conceptualizing an Emergent Collaborative Organization

Innovation cooperative systems and structural change: An evolutionary analysis of Anecoop and Mondragon cases

Economía social + innovación tecnológica: Experiencias de Éxito en Entornos de Precariedad

Base de données sur les études de cas en innovation sociale produites dans le cadre des activités du CRISES. Présentation générale et manuel de codification

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Evaluating competing public policy approaches towards the informal economy

AccèsLogis Québec (1997-2015): les hauts et les bas de la co-construction d’une politique publique

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Nonprofits as “Schools of Democracy”: A Comparative Case Study of Two Environmental Organizations

The Emergence of Dual-Identity Social Entrepreneurship: Its Boundaries and Limitations

Social Enterprise in Mental Health: An Overview

Économie sociale: La solidarité au défi de l’efficacité (livre)

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Moving Beyong Capitalisme (Book)

Revenue Diversification in Housing Nonprofits: Impact of State Funding Environments

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 


 

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Governance and Performance in Public and Non-Profit Organizations

Alessandro Hinna, Luca Gnan and Fabio Monteduro. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Studies in Public and Non-Profit Governance, volume 5, 350 pages, April 2016.

http://books.emeraldinsight.com/display.asp?K=9781786351081&
cur=GBP&sf1=kword_index%2Cbarcode%2Cseries&sort=sort_date
%2Fd&st1=Governance+and+Performance+in+Public+and+Non-Profit+Organizations&sf2=eh_cat_class&button_login=Go&m=1&dc=1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Studies in Public and Non-Profit Governance (SPNPG) publishes double-blind peer reviewed articles in a growing area of governance research. The series focuses on the 'micro' level of governance in public and non-profit sector. Compared to the wider debate on corporate governance in the private sector and to the literature on the 'macro' and 'meso' levels of governance in the public sector, the organizational (micro) level of governance remains a neglected area of governance in the public and non-profit sector. Therefore, governance systems, mechanisms and roles are primarily investigated at organizational level. SPNPG allows for the establishment of an engaged community of researchers very active in the field. It aims to contribute to the definition of the theoretical components that assign an innovation role to governance systems in public and nonprofit organizations. It also highlights the opportunity for a deeper analysis of governance mechanisms in their relationships with both the external (stakeholders) actors and the internal (management) actors and address the conditions which enable governance mechanisms to effectively cover their own roles.”

 

When Stakeholder Representation Leads to Faultlines. A Study of Board Service Performance in Social Enterprises

Saskia Crucke and Mirjam Knockaert. Journal of Management Studies (article in press), April 2016.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joms.12197/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Following the growing interest in sustainability and ethics, organizations are increasingly attentive to accountability toward stakeholders. Stakeholder representation, obtained by appointing board members representing different stakeholder groups, is suggested to be a good ethical practice. However, such representation may also have nefarious implications for board functioning. Particularly, it may result in strong faultline emergence, subsequently mitigating board performance. Our study aims at understanding the process through which faultlines affect board performance, and particularly the board service role through which the board is involved in providing counsel and strategic decision-making. We study the relationship between faultlines and board service performance in the particularly relevant context of social enterprises. We find that faultline strength is negatively related to board service performance and that this relationship is mediated by board task conflict. Furthermore, our study reveals the importance of clear and shared organizational goals in attenuating the negative effects of faultlines.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

Social capital, household income, and community development in Bhutan: a case study of a dairy cooperative

Galey Tenzin, Kaoru Natsuda. Development in Practice, volume 26, issue 4, pages 467-480, May 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/
cdip/2016/00000026/00000004/art00007

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Using a case of a dairy cooperative in Bhutan, this study investigates how social capital enhances individual household income and community development in rural areas. It also examines the influence of cooperatives in social capital formation. The study finds that social capital facilitates households that are resource-constrained by working together to reduce costs through economies of scale, enhancing information accessibility, building confidence, and strengthening teamwork. It fosters not only an improvement in the livelihoods of cooperative members, but also provides a positive influence for non-members and the community as a whole. The study also reveals that cooperatives influence formation of three forms of bonding, bridging, and linking social capitals. While bonding social capital facilitates strong teamwork among the members, bridging and linking social capitals connect the cooperatives with the outside networks and provides them more opportunities and services for its sustainability.”

 

Community Variation in the Financial Health of Nonprofit Human Service Organizations: An Examination of Organizational and Contextual Effects

Marcus Lam and Lindsey McDougle. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 3, pages 500-525, May 2016.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/45/3/500?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Nonprofit human services organizations (HSOs) provide vital services to communities. Yet studies show that the density of these nonprofits varies from one community to the next, often with fewer quantities located in vulnerable communities. These findings have led to concerns regarding the ability of the human services subsector to meet community needs. In this article, however, we make the argument that organizational density is a limited indicator of a sector’s ability to provide services, and suggest that financial health is a more robust indicator. We model six measures of financial health as conceptualized by Bowman and examine relationships between these measures and indicators of community vulnerability. Our results indicate that variation exists in four of our six outcome measures (equity ratio, months of spending, mark up, and months of liquidity), and that contextual effects (e.g., being located in a minority or low-mobility community) partially explain these variances.”

 

Social reporting and voluntary disclosure in Italian Credit Cooperative Banks

Antonio Thomas Bruna Marinangeli. International Journal of Disclosure and Governance, volume 13, issue 2, pages 178-194, may 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/pal/jdg
/2016/00000013/00000002/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: According to the business and managerial literature, nowadays it is increasingly important for enterprises to carry out development processes according to ethical principles and behaviors. With this in mind, the article focuses on a specific type of firms: cooperative credit banks. They are habitually seen as institutions which show a clear orientation toward ethics because their main objective is to provide direct benefits to internal and external stakeholders. To this aim, through an empirical investigation of their Websites, we analyze the propensity of these banks to provide Social Reports. Within the stakeholder management theory, the attention to mission, the number of stakeholders identified, the prospects of social reporting and their structure, and other aspects, are analyzed. Although many researches show that banking systems with a high number of cooperative banks can handle future potential periods of financial stress more efficiently, on the empirical side, the survey highlights that these banks are not ready yet to address the growing audience of potential customers who seem to be more interested in the respect of ethical and social conditions.”

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

Measures of Performance in the Context of International Social Ventures: An Exploratory Study

Erin Chmelik, Martina Musteen and Mujtaba Ahsan. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume7, issue 1, pages 74-100, May 2016.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19420676.2014.997781

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This study reviews literature on performance measures among international social ventures and draws interviews with 12 US social ventures to explore how the use of such measures varies depending on the type of social venture, its funding business model, and scale of operations. We find some distinct differences in the use of performance measures among the different types of social enterprises related to the focus on stakeholders, emphasis on inputs, outputs, and outcomes. Implications for theory and practice of social entrepreneurship are discussed.”


 

 

The impact of coopetition-based open innovation on performance in nonprofit sports clubs

Wemmer Felix, Emrich Eike, Koenigstorfer Joerg. European Sport Management Quarterly, volume, 16, issue 3, pages 341-363, May 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/esmq
/2016/00000016/00000003/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This study conceptualizes and tests the impact of a coopetition-based open innovation approach on organizational performance of nonprofit sports clubs. In particular, it examines the effect of collaborations with competitors (i.e. coopetition) on the organizational performance of clubs via both use of outside knowledge and the adoption of new services, processes, and business models (i.e. organizational-level innovations). A statewide online survey with 292 members of the board of directors of nonprofit sports clubs was conducted in Germany (Saarland). The survey used valid and reliable scales and considered self-reported financial stability and membership development as organizational performance indicators. Structural equation modeling was applied to test the mediation model. The proposed coopetition-based open innovation model has a good model fit. Engagement in coopetition has a positive effect on organizational performance via two sequential mediators: use of outside knowledge and innovation implementation. In addition, use of outside knowledge has a direct positive effect on organizational performance. Nonprofit sports clubs should take advantage of collaborations with competitors and exploit external knowledge to the best of their abilities. The adoption of new services, processes, and business models on the organizational level helps nonprofit sports clubs stay competitive in an increasingly contested sports services market. The study provides both theoretical and managerial implications that help sports clubs innovate and increase organizational performance.”

 

The Development of a Measurement Instrument for the Organizational Performance of Social Enterprises

Saskia Crucke and Adelien Decramer. Sustainability, volume 8, issue 161, pages 1-30, February 2016.

http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/8/2/161

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “There is a growing consensus that the adoption of performance measurement tools are of particular interest for social enterprises in order to support internal decision‐making and to answer the demands of accountability toward their stakeholders. As a result, different methodologies to assess the non‐financial performance of social enterprises are developed by academics and practitioners. Many of these methodologies are on the one hand discussions of general guidelines or, on the other hand, very case specific. As such, these methodologies do not offer a functional tool for a broad range of social enterprises. The goal of this article is to fill this gap by developing an instrument suitable for the internal assessment and the external reporting of the non‐financial performance of a diverse group of social enterprises. To reach this goal, we used qualitative (focus groups and a Delphi panel) and quantitative research methods (exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis), involving multiple actors in the field of social entrepreneurship. Focusing on five dimensions of organizational performance (economic, environmental, community, human and governance performance), we offer a set of indicators and an assessment tool for social enterprises.”

 

Accountability Standards for Nonprofit Organizations: Do Organizations Benefit from Certification Programs?

Feng, Neely and Slatten, International Journal of Public Administration, volume 39, issue 6, page 470-479, May 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/lpad/
2016/00000039/00000006/art00006

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Stakeholders are demanding nonprofit organizations (NPOs) continually improve and work effectively in an ever-changing environment. While there are many ways to approach this operational challenge, this paper examines the impact of acquiring an accountability certification, specifically the Standards for Excellence® Certification. Using a sample of 102 NPOs that have received the Standards for Excellence certification, we find that the certification is associated with increases in public support relative to a control group that did not receive the certification. These results suggest that some stakeholders favorably respond to the certification process, and NPOs can realize tangible benefits from becoming certified.”


 

 

Indicators and metrics for social business: a review of current approaches

Bengo Irene, Arena Marika, Azzone Giovanni and Calderini Mario. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 7, issue 1, pages 1-24, May 2016.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19420676.2015.1049286

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:This paper aims to perform a review of different accounting frameworks, including indicators and metrics applicable to the social business sector, discussing the strengths and the weaknesses of different approaches in relationship to their ability to respond to objectives and interests of different stakeholders in the social business ecosystem. Then, the paper discusses the key role that indicators and metrics could play in the light of the transformations that the social business sector is witnessing, such as the emergence of new financial supply chains and the entrance of new relevant players.”

 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Exploring Expectations of Nonprofit Management Capabilities

Adelle Bish and Karen Becker. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 3, pages 437-457, May 2016.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/45/3/437?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Management capabilities have been widely researched in the private and public sectors, yet there is less evidence relating to the nonprofit sector. Increasing pressures to balance the demands of organizational values with business performance in this sector leads to a focus on the managerial capabilities required to meet these expectations. This article reports an exploratory study of capability expectations of managers within an Australian nonprofit organization. Using semistructured interviews, data were collected from 21 managers across three hierarchical levels. Findings indicate that while there is some overlap with managerial requirements in the private and public sectors, there are some unique aspects of nonprofit operations which warrant further investigation. Specifically, there was an emphasis on personal knowledge and experience (i.e., self-awareness, discipline, knowledge, and strategic thinking) and having a commitment to the nonprofit sector and values of the organization. Expectations also varied depending on the level of management within the organization.”

 

Exploring what nonprofit branding can learn from contemporary art

Jeffrey F. Durgee. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, volume 21, issue 2, pages 73–81, May 2016.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nvsm.
1543/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:As more and more nonprofits seek to refashion themselves as brands, they tend to take inspiration from for-profit organizations. Another domain that has had similar purposes to those of nonprofit branding for many years is contemporary art. This is an exploratory paper that looks at a recent trend in art, “message art,” and how it might inform nonprofit branding. Message art deals with many social issues that drive major nonprofits today including everything from pro-environment causes to anti-segregationist issues. This paper has two purposes: (1) to call attention to message art among nonprofit brand managers and (2) to explain how they can use this art. Message art is useful to the extent that it calls attention to new ideological trends and often provides selected pieces of art that can serve as exemplars of brand essence for relevant causes. Results are provided from a small, qualitative study of women's feelings about selected examples of feminist art. Two pieces of art drew the most positive responses. One piece, “Egyptian Rocket Goddess,” is felt to be a harbinger of Third Wave Feminism. Another piece, “Blessed Art Thou Among Women,” is felt to be an effective source of inspiration and direction for feminist organizations, which focus on mother–daughter relationships.”


 

 

Applying Delphi method for strategic design of social entrepreneurship

Androniki Kavoura and Tuula Andersson. Library Review, volume 65, issue 3, pages 185-205; May 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mcb/035/2016
/00000065/00000003/art00004

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:This paper aims to examine the strategic design for entrepreneurial activity. This study examines and evaluates a qualitative Delphi methodology used in a research for the strategy development needs of entrepreneurship counselling and education. The strategic design presented may well apply to non-profit organisations due to the fact that limited resources in funding of non-profit organisations exist. This paper introduces methodological considerations of applying the Delphi method to the strategy development for an entrepreneurship counselling design, taking Ensimetri – an entrepreneurship counselling organisation in Finland – as a case study, and the potential in applying this strategic design projects to libraries and information management centres. The research provides a framework on entrepreneurial strategic design. The top ten items that emerged from this research may provide the framework for the development of entrepreneurial strategic design. They may be used to further examine our understanding for the strategy development needs of entrepreneurship counselling and education, as very limited research has taken place on this issue. Issues of culture are discussed. Findings illustrate that respondents would appreciate guidance on the initiation of entrepreneurial activities from the university that are associated with programmes and services provided that may help them on the initiation of entrepreneurial activities. Libraries may use the integrated information systems they employ. This exploratory study found that cultural values may influence entrepreneurship intention. Gender issues are also discussed in regard to the strategic design of entrepreneurial activity, adding to the existing literature for gender differences in attitude. The research provides a framework on entrepreneurial strategic design, and the role of universities with the use of integrated information systems and library services to the initiation of such entrepreneurial activities.”

 

 

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

What is the Social Innovation Community? Conceptualizing an Emergent Collaborative Organization

Tuukka Toivonen. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 7, issue 1, pages 49-73, May 2016.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19420676.2014.997779

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Although social innovation is stimulating tremendous interest among scholars and policy-makers, its emergent catalysts are insufficiently understood. This paper thus identifies and explores a relevant collaborative organization, the social innovation community (SIC). Found in cosmopolitan cities, SICs are held together by recognizable shared cultures and online/offline spaces. This account sets out a basic categorization of SICs, profiles their salient features, and offers an original definition. SICs support early-stage social entrepreneurship but may also help to introduce social innovation into new cultural settings, re-programme wider innovation circuits, and promote productive collaboration amid diversity.”

 

Innovation cooperative systems and structural change: An evolutionary analysis of Anecoop and Mondragon cases

Juan Ramón Gallego-Bono and Rafael Chaves-Avila. Journal of Business Research (article in press), April 2016.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296316302144

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:In a globalized world, clusters, or territorial production systems, need to evolve into innovation systems to retain their competitive advantages and be able to develop. This study analyzes the cooperative entrepreneurship model as a means of structural change for these clusters, constituting a third way between the private business way and the government-oriented way. Building on an evolutionist approach and a qualitative comparative methodology, the study analyzes two successful cooperatives: Mondragon and Anecoop. As a novelty, this article explains the innovation process from an institutional perspective, combining micro–meso–macro levels. The results confirm that cooperatives are able to articulate structural change processes at the meso-level and to give rise to meso-rules that are functional and determinant in the processes of structural change. The two factors that enable these processes are the cooperative Schumpeterian entrepreneurs and the Hayekian meta-institutions.”


 

 

Economía social + innovación tecnológica: Experiencias de Éxito en Entornos de Precariedad 

García Elia María Irigoyen. Journal of Technology Management and Innovation, volume 11, issue 1, pages 86-92, May 2016.

https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84964199641&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&txGid=0

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Associative models based on principles of social economy, have shown that they promote fair distribution of income, besides self-management, democracy, solidarity and local development. The Project Social Economy Idit Ibero aims to incubate, promote, or strengthen social enterprises, mainly located in poor or vulnerable areas, incorporating a “significant component” of technological development and innovation. The social, business and technological innovation aligned to the principles of the social economy, promote the formation and survival of companies and groups that solve their individual and groupal needs.”

 

Base de données sur les études de cas en innovation sociale produites dans le cadre des activités du CRISES. Présentation générale et manuel de codification

Marie J. Bouchard, Louise Briand, Juan-Luis Klein, Benoît Lévesque, Catherine Trudelle, Alexandre Duchesne, Blondin, David Longtin, Jessica Olivier-Nault et Mathieu Pelletier.  Cahier du CRISES, numéro ET1602, 214 pages, Janvier 2016.

https://crises.uqam.ca/upload/files/publications/etudes-
theoriques/CRISES_ET1602.pdf

 Résumé issu du l’URL ci-haut: « Ce cahier vise à présenter les travaux qui ont été réalisés afin de conceptualiser et d’implanter la Base de données sur l’innovation sociale (BDIS) mise en place par le Centre de recherche sur les innovations sociales (CRISES). Le document détaille le contexte de production de la BDIS, l’approche de l’innovation sociale (IS) adoptée et la littérature consultée en appui au modèle conceptuel, la méthode employée pour l