ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 10, NUMÉRO 6, JUIN 2015

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Talking Across Boundaries: A Case Study of Distributed Governance

Exploring the Participation of Women in Financial Cooperatives and Credit Unions in Developing Countries

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Intermediary Perceptions of Investment Readiness in the UK Social Investment Market

Are Cooperative Banks a Lever for Promoting Bank Stability? Evidence from the Recent Financial Crisis in OECD Countries

Women's Agricultural Co-operatives in Greece: A Comprehensive Review and SWOT Analysis

Northern Communities Working Together: the Social Economy of Canada’s North (book)

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Mind the Gap: Expectations and Experiences of Clients Utilizing Job-Training Services in a Social Enterprise

The New Merger: Combining Third Sector and Market-Based Approaches to Tackling Inequalities

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Social Capital’s Role in the Development of Volunteer-Led Cooperatives

Does Learning Orientation Matter for Nonprofit Organization Performance? Empirical Evidence from Ghana

NPOs in China: Capacity-Building Development Since the 1990s

Incentives, Procurement and Regulation of Work Integration Social Enterprises in France: Old Ideas for New Firms?

Brand ‘Infrastructure’ in Nonprofit Organizations: Challenges to Successful Brand Building?

Can Marketing Contribute to Sustainable Social Enterprise?

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Civic Events in a Dynamic Local Field. The Role of Participation for Social Innovation

A Hybrid Approach to Innovation by Social Enterprises: Lessons from Africa

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

“The Most Supportive Environment in the World”? Tracing the Development of an Institutional ‘Ecosystem’ for Social Enterprise

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Stewardship Revisited at the Fuzzy Ends of the Yunus Social Business Framework

Au-delà du marché. Les nouvelles voies de la démarchandisation (livre)

Social and Solidarity Economy. Beyond the Fringe (book)

Dialogue in the Dark: Shedding Light on the Development of Social Enterprises in China

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Changement social et économie solidaire : les événements dans le processus de recherche

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

Some Current Issues and Challenges in the Social Economy

Unveiling the Economic Rationale behind the Social Business Model

VARIA

L’économie sociale. Une réponse aux besoins de proximité

ACTIVITÉS DE RECHERCHE ET DE FORMATION

Research and formation activities / Actividades de investigación y formación

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Talking Across Boundaries: A Case Study of Distributed Governance

Carrie M. Duncan and Megan A. Schoor. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 3, pages 731-755, June 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/
10.1007/s11266-014-9453-2

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “We explore the relation between organizational culture and governance in distributed nonprofit organizations. The transmission of culture across geographic distances facilitates governance in nonprofit distributed organizations, allowing distributed members to span the boundary of the organization to accomplish organizational objectives. We suggest that boundary-spanning is a key aspect of governance in distributed nonprofit organizations. While much of the governance literature focuses on the boundary-spanning activities of nonprofit boards, we describe boundary-spanning as an activity engaged in by distributed organizational members of nonprofit organizations. Distributed workers negotiate multiple relationships at the edge of their organization, what we call talking across boundaries. We present an in-depth case study that illustrates successful governance in a distributed nonprofit organization. We identify the elements of organizational culture that contribute to governance processes and facilitate the achievement of organizational objectives.”

 

Exploring the Participation of Women in Financial Cooperatives and Credit Unions in Developing Countries

Karabi C. Bezboruah and Vijayan Pillai. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 3, pages 913-940, June 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/
10.1007/s11266-014-9467-9

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Participation of women in microfinance institutions (MFIs) is touted to advance development in developing economies. By applying the stakeholder theory, we examine the magnitude of women’s participation across MFIs based on their legal characteristics, that is, cooperatives and non-cooperatives across the following dimensions—organizational size, efficiency, loan size, and gender mix. We find that in the case of the cooperative types of MFIs, increases in average loan sizes are associated with decreases in female participation in the administration and governance. Further, the findings demonstrate that with increases in the participation of women borrowers, the number of women in organizational governance also increases. These findings suggest important research and practical implications regarding women’s empowerment through participation in mutual cooperative societies. We conclude that credit unions and cooperatives could be an effective tool for enhancing women’s participation in organizational administration and governance.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

Intermediary Perceptions of Investment Readiness in the UK Social Investment Market

Richard Hazenberg, Fred Seddon and Simon Denny. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 3, pages 846-871, June 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/
10.1007/s11266-014-9473-y

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The ‘social investment market’ in the United Kingdom is a growth area due to the governments’ focus upon building up the supply-side element of the market over the last decade, often through the direct financing of ‘Social and Investment Finance Intermediaries’ (SIFIs). However, this ignores problems that can occur on the demand-side of the social investment market, such as a lack of ‘investment readiness’ amongst social enterprises seeking investment. Indeed, whilst there is now a significant body of policy-based and practitioner research exploring the social investment market, there remains a paucity of empirical academic research. The research reported in this paper sought to explore SIFI perceptions of what constituted investment readiness in the social investment market. Semi-structured interviews were held with the fund managers (or relevant personnel) at 15 SIFIs in order to explore what they believed constituted investment readiness and how they assessed this. The results indicate that the conception of investment readiness in the social investment market is similar to that held in mainstream financial markets. The results are discussed in relation to the prior literature and theories of the social investment market.”

 

Are Cooperative Banks a Lever for Promoting Bank Stability? Evidence from the Recent Financial Crisis in OECD Countries

Laura Chiaramonte, Frederica Poli and Marco Ercole Oriani. European Financial Management, volume 21, issue 3, pages 491-523, June 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1111/j.1468-036X.2013.12026.x/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Based on a sample of cooperative, savings, and commercial banks from OECD countries, this paper examines whether and to what extent cooperative banks affected average bank soundness during 2001–2010. To account for the impact of the recent financial crisis, we analyse separately the pre-crisis period (2001–2006) and crisis years (2007–2010). Unlike published claims that blame the fragility of banking systems on the presence of non–profit-maximising entities, our main finding is that cooperative banks have explanatory power for stabilisation during the crisis years, but only above a certain market share threshold.”

 

Women's Agricultural Co-operatives in Greece: A Comprehensive Review and SWOT Analysis

Panagiota Sergaki, Maria Partalidou and Olga Iakovidou. Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, volume 20, issue 1, March 2015.

http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/
abs/10.1142/S1084946715500028?src=
recsys&journalCode=jde

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Very few women's co-operatives exist in Europe today; of those that do, the vast majority are involved in non-agricultural sectors. For the past thirty years in Greece, numerous women's agricultural co-operatives have been established in rural areas and scholars have articulated several aspects of their role in both women's life and the local development. A cursory glance at the history of the women's agricultural co-operatives in Greece and a review of the literature highlights the uniqueness of this type of entrepreneurship (a rarity in Europe) and their significant role for rural society cohesion, mainly in geographically and economically isolated rural areas. In this paper we employ a SWOT analysis to elaborate on strengths and weaknesses, which vary from co-operative to co-operative. Either bottom-up or top-down created women's co-operatives are currently a social innovation. Their strengths mainly concern economic independence and social inclusion of women in rural areas, while their weaknesses are mainly associated with funding, organization, administration, know how, culture, product promotion and marketing problems. Nevertheless, they are called upon to survive in a competitive environment; although difficult, it is one that provides opportunities that most likely can outweigh threats.”

 

Northern Communities Working Together: the Social Economy of Canada’s North (book)

Chris Southcott (ed.). University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division, 304 pages, April 2015.

http://www.utppublishing.com/Northern-
Communities-Working-Together-The-Social-
Economy-of-Canada-s-North.html

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The unique historical, economic, and social features of the Canadian North pose special challenges for the social economy – a sector that includes nonprofits, co-operatives, social enterprises, and community economic development organizations. Northern Communities Working Together highlights the innovative ways in which Northerners are using the social economy to meet their economic, social, and cultural challenges while increasing local control and capabilities. The contributors focus on the special challenges of the North and their impact on the scope of the social economy, including analyses of land claim organizations, hunter support programs, and Indigenous conceptions of the social economy. A welcome resource for scholars and policy-makers studying any aspect of the Canadian North, Northern Communities Working Together is a major contribution to the literature on the social economy in Canada.”

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

Mind the Gap: Expectations and Experiences of Clients Utilizing Job-Training Services in a Social Enterprise

Marlene Walk, Itay Greenspan, Honey Crossley and Femida Handy. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 2, pages 221-244, June 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1111/apce.12080/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper offers an underexplored perspective of social impact assessment by integrating clients’ evaluation of the impact of job-training and skills-building programs. Drawing on the literature of ‘met expectations’, we investigate the personal and social impact, beyond job placement, of job-training and skills-building programs provided by a Canadian social enterprise from the perspective of the clients. Utilizing data from a pre-test/post-test quasi-experiment, we assess the differences, between program participants as compared to a control group of nonparticipants, on several measures. Findings illuminate the gap between expectations and actual experiences, and point to the importance of integrating the clients’ perspective. Such measures enable leaders of social enterprises to account for the often neglected intangibles of their social missions.”

 

The New Merger: Combining Third Sector and Market-Based Approaches to Tackling Inequalities

Michael J. Roy, Clementine O’Connor, Neil McHugh, Olga Biosca and Cam Donaldson. Social Business, volume 5, issue 1, pages 47-60, Spring 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/
content/westburn/sb/2015/00000005/
00000001/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “In this paper we discuss the challenge posed by growing inequalities, specifically health inequalities, which have grown increasingly wider in recent decades. Rather than arguing for a wholesale return to state intervention to curb the worst excesses of the market, we put forward a less obvious potential solution, arguing for a greater role - and greater recognition - for the 'social economy': the part of the third or non-profit sector concerned with trading in the market rather than relying upon public funds or charitable donations to stay in business. We present three examples of such organisations, drawn from the UK, and discuss how doing business in such a way presents obvious benefits for, but challenges to, existing thinking, particularly in relation to how 'success' should be measured.”

 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Social Capital’s Role in the Development of Volunteer-Led Cooperatives

Adam Richards and John Reed. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 11, issue 1, pages 4-23, 2015.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/
abs/10.1108/SEJ-09-2013-0037

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this study is to evaluate how social capital is developed in a third sector organisation based in the north-west of England, a small food cooperative run by volunteers. Social capital comprises the bonds, bridges and linkages that hold together societal members, and it can be considered to be a precursor of economic capital. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with key informants, observations and documents. Data were analysed using either a template or a thematic analysis to identify aspects of social capital development. A model of the interactions between and within the three main stakeholder groups involved in the cooperative is presented. This model shows how these interactions can develop social capital, and it discusses how potential deficits in social capital can occur. The findings have practical and theoretical implications, in that they may better equip third-sector organisations to understand how social capital is developed. This is one of few practical studies of social capital development in a social enterprise and provides valuable insights into the processes by which this is done.”

 

Does Learning Orientation Matter for Nonprofit Organization Performance? Empirical Evidence from Ghana

Yusif Baba. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, volume 36, issue 3, pages 234-252, April 2015.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/
full/10.1108/LODJ-05-2013-0056

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Many changes taking place in the nonprofit sector have created an environment in which organizational learning could be regarded as representing a high-profile notion with strategic importance for nonprofit organizations (NPOs), but its application in the nonprofit sector has not received adequate research attention. The purpose of this paper is to present an empirical test of the relationship between learning orientation and NPO performance. Literature on organizational learning is briefly reviewed and a marketing-focussed perspective on learning is adopted. Then drawing from resource-based theory and relationship marketing, a conceptual model is developed that links learning orientation to NPO performance, predicting that noneconomic performance would mediate between learning orientation and economic performance. Using Baron and Kenny’s mediation regression procedure, this prediction is subjected to an empirical test with survey data collected on 118 NPOs operating in Ghana. This study addresses the important question of whether paying attention to their mission helps NPOs acquire critical resources from their funding entities, discussing this issue in the context of organizational learning to respond to RBT scholars’ call for more research that highlight the underlying processes through which strategic resources (such as organizational learning) contribute to the organization’s financial outcomes.”

 

NPOs in China: Capacity-Building Development Since the 1990s

Changwen Li and Jing Guo. Asian Social Work and Policy Review, volume 9, issue 1, pages 79-93, February 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1111/aswp.12048/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The development of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) in China has experienced unprecedented growth since the 1990s. Capacity-building is a critical aspect of NPO research. Based on data through document reviews and personal interviews, we conducted a systematic analysis and presented a conceptual framework to examine NPO capacity-building in China. Three main bodies – government agencies, educational institutions, and supporting NPOs – lead NPO capacity-building, and its development has experienced four critical stages: starting, localization, standardization, and diversification. A major implication for international literature and policy lies in the discovery of an evolving environmental context of NPO development in China.”

 

Incentives, Procurement and Regulation of Work Integration Social Enterprises in France: Old Ideas for New Firms?

Patrick Gianfadoni and Pierre-Henri Morand. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 2, pages 199-219, June 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1111/apce.12078/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Work Integration Social Enterprises (WISEs) in France become increasingly dependent on commercial resources through public and private markets. Following New Public Management reforms that try to modernize the sector via market oriented management, they have restructured and modified their practices. We compare the normative prescriptions of the theory of incentives in regulation to the actual practices. The trend toward competitive process is described and the form of incentives contract toward workfare is detailed. Are the main insights of this literature appealing for this kind of enterprises? Do the traditional incentives and contract theories ignore some very specific features of WISEs entities? We point out the drawbacks of potentially inaccurate forms of regulation contracts currently used.”

 

Brand ‘Infrastructure’ in Nonprofit Organizations: Challenges to Successful Brand Building?

Chris Chapleo. Journal of Marketing Communications, volume 21, issue 3, pages 199-209, May 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/
10.1080/13527266.2012.741609

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The particular purpose of this study was to examine and explore the factors necessary within nonprofit organizations (NPOs) for successful branding, and challenges in their implementation. The approach was an appropriate inductive qualitative one, conducted through depth interviews with opinion formers. Although there has been some research into the variables necessary to successfully build brands, only limited work considers anything other than commercial branding contexts. The originality is that through this work both theory and practice of branding in NPOs will be better informed so that structures to support branding can be better managed. Factors considered important to branding were identified, particularly leadership, employee understanding and clear vision. It was interesting that respondents generally agreed that limited marketing budgets were not necessarily a major problem. The research also identified variables that contribute to a conceptual model of nonprofit brand management, experiential and emotional branding in particular being notable as offering possible platforms for differentiation. The work is exploratory in nature and therefore informs understanding of brand management in a nonprofit context and forms a basis for wider empirical testing.”

 

Can Marketing Contribute to Sustainable Social Enterprise?

Madeline Powell and Stephen P. Osbourne. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 11, issue 1, pages 24-46, 2015.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/
abs/10.1108/SEJ-01-2014-0009

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper aims to explore the role of marketing as a route to sustainability for social enterprises providing public services. It examines the tensions between the economic and social objectives, both of social enterprises and of marketing. It concludes by offering a new model of the role of marketing for sustainable social enterprises. This paper used the case study approach which included four cases. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the chief executives of each social enterprise. The cases were classified by age. The paper demonstrates that while marketing potentially has much to offer in terms of organisational resilience for social enterprises, its application is currently undermined by its misunderstanding in practise within a “product-dominant” business logic. Despite this, the study finds a strong element of the unconscious application of marketing by social enterprises. The implications of this are discussed in the context of the “public service-dominant” business logic that is currently emerging in public management, and recommendations are made for policy and practice as to how to enhance the contribution of marketing, both to sustainable social enterprises and to public services delivery.”

 

 

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

 

Civic Events in a Dynamic Local Field. The Role of Participation for Social Innovation

Sebastiano Citroni. Industry & Innovation, volume 22, issue 3, April 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/
10.1080/13662716.2015.1033838

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Despite the spread of a variety of small-scale civic events, little is known about their potential for promoting innovation and field-wide implications. This paper addresses these points drawing on a study of 52 civic events in Milan between 2006 and 2010, which were set up by 10 nonprofit organizations within a shared local field. In order to assess if and how the observed events relate to a number of transformations that the local field underwent during the research period, an analytical typology of events' development is proposed. The results suggest that patterns of events' development are not neutral with respect to the production of field-relevant implications and that the triggering of social innovation processes by events requires pro-active public participation in their development processes.”

 

A Hybrid Approach to Innovation by Social Enterprises: Lessons from Africa

Sudheer Gupta, Stefanie Beninger and Jai Ganesh. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 11, issue 1, pages 89-112, 2015.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/
abs/10.1108/SEJ-04-2014-0023

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper aims to provide a detailed analysis of the key capabilities needed for social enterprises to succeed in the context of extreme poverty. Facilitating growth and alleviating poverty in the world’s most impoverished regions requires introducing innovative solutions to achieve social impact while generating financial returns. This paper studies two social enterprises operating in Africa. Semi-structured interviewers were conducted with co-founders of the organizations. The transcribed interviews were analyzed through an open coding process, iterated to overarching categories, and compared between the organizations using a grounded theory approach. Secondary archival data and respondent validation were used to triangulate these findings. This paper proposes a model that highlights five key capabilities social enterprises need to tackle complex societal challenges while overcoming resource constraints and institutional voids. The processes followed to develop and deploy these capabilities are delineated, and the necessity of hybrid mechanisms that blend non-profit and private-sector approaches is shown as a key enabler for social enterprises to meet their dual objectives. This research is limited to two cases studies from two different industries in Africa. Future research would refine and extend the proposed model to increase generalizability. This paper addresses a gap in the literature on understanding innovation and entrepreneurship in Africa, and it proposes a model for innovation derived from data. This paper also offers insights to the growing community of social entrepreneurs looking to develop sustainable solutions to societal challenges.”

 

 

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

 

“The Most Supportive Environment in the World”? Tracing the Development of an Institutional ‘Ecosystem’ for Social Enterprise

Michael J. Roy, Neil McHugh, Leslie Huckfield, Alan Kay and Cam Donaldson. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 3, pages 777-800, June 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/
10.1007/s11266-014-9459-9

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “While numerous accounts of policy frameworks associated with country-level support for social enterprise activity exist, explanations for when, why and how policy interventions in support of social enterprise have been adopted have been, to date, much more thin on the ground. This paper aims to contribute to addressing this perceived gap by presenting the case of Scotland, recently hailed by First Minister Alex Salmond as “the most supportive environment in the world for social enterprise”. Historical Institutionalism is used to explain how such a ‘supportive environment’ might have come about and, looking at, in turn, when, why and how the conditions for social enterprise in Scotland have developed, we attempt to contribute to the ongoing international debate concerning the importance of the policy environment to fostering the conditions for social enterprise activity not only to emerge, but also to thrive.”

 

 

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

 

Stewardship Revisited at the Fuzzy Ends of the Yunus Social Business Framework

Maria Ballesteros-Sola. Social Business, volume 5, issue 1, pages 33-46, Spring 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/
westburn/sb/2015/00000005/00000001/art00004

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “In recent years, there has been a growing number of projects and organisations self-labelled as a Grameen or Yunus Social Business (YSB). The model has attracted the interest of media, academic researchers and practitioners. This paper presents a theoretical model to frame the diverse phenomena of Yunus Social Business, reviewing its different components through the lens of stewardship theory. The paper aims to extend the interest about YSB beyond social entrepreneurship and attract researchers from overlapping fields. Analysis of agency-stewardship literature points to a lack of consensus on what theory dominates corporate social responsibility (CSR), nonprofits and social entrepreneurship agent-principal relationships, so stewardship is revisited to understand its exploratory validity in the different domains described in the YSB framework.”

 

Au-delà du marché. Les nouvelles voies de la démarchandisation (livre)

Bernard Perret. Éditions Les petits matins, 104 pages, mai 2015.

http://www.lespetitsmatins.fr/
collections/au-dela-du-marche-les-
nouvelles-voies-de-la-demarchandisation/

Résumé ici de l’URL ci-dessus: « La croissance est désormais structurellement faible en Europe. Est-ce dû à des politiques économiques  inadéquates ? À une panne de l’innovation ? En partie sans doute, mais cette langueur renvoie surtout à un problème plus fondamental : l’épuisement du « cœur du réacteur » de l’économie capitaliste, à savoir le mécanisme de transformation des besoins en marchandises. De nouvelles pratiques sociales émergent : troc, réparation, jardins partagés, échange de logement, crowdfunding, fab- labs, économie collaborative, qui sont autant de réponses spontanées à cette situation de blocage. Mais il y a plus : au sein même du monde productif s’affirment des logiques de coproduction, de coopération, de responsabilité écologique et de symbiose avec la société qui s’éloignent des schémas de rationalité typiques du capitalisme. Fort diverses à tous égards, ces innovations sont porteuses de valeurs démocratiques et d’une aspiration à contribuer activement au bien commun. Elles devraient être favorisées par des politiques publiques imaginatives et ambitieuses. Car, à l’heure où le pouvoir d’achat stagne et où les impératifs écologiques se font sentir, une amélioration de la qualité de vie est possible si l’on produit et consomme autrement. »

 

Social and Solidarity Economy. Beyond the Fringe (book)

Peter Utting. Zed Books, 400 pages, April 2015.

http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/
node/20862

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “As economic crises, growing inequality and climate change prompt a global debate on the meaning and trajectory of development, increasing attention is focusing on 'social and solidarity economy' as a distinctive approach to sustainable and rights-based development. While we are beginning to understand what social and solidarity economy is, what it promises and how it differs from 'business as usual', we know far less about whether it can really move beyond its fringe status in many countries and regions. Under what conditions can social and solidarity economy scale up and scale out - that is, expand in terms of the growth of social and solidarity economy organizations and enterprises, or spread horizontally within given territories? Bringing together leading researchers, blending theoretical and empirical analysis, and drawing on experiences and case studies from multiple countries and regions, this volume addresses these questions. In so doing, it aims to inform a broad constituency of development actors, including scholars, practitioners, activists and policy makers.”

 

Dialogue in the Dark: Shedding Light on the Development of Social Enterprises in China

Hua Wang, Ilan Alon and Chris Kimble. Global Business and Organizational Excellence, volume 34, issue 4, pages 60-69, May/June 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1002/joe.21615/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The application of for-profit business practices to nonprofit organizations, social enterprises are a way for nonprofit organizations to find funding in a time of rising costs, falling donations, and increased competition from for-profit businesses in the social sector. Although well established in the mature economies of the West, these enterprises are a novelty in the emerging economies of Asia and in the transitional economies of the former communist world. The experiences of Dialogue in the Dark, a social enterprise concerned with the problems associated with blindness, highlight the unique challenges that social enterprises face in China and offer lessons for entrepreneurs who may wish to embark on a similar venture.”

 

 

AUTRES

Other / Otros

 

Changement social et économie solidaire : les événements dans le processus de recherche

Jean-Louis Laville. Nouvelle revue de psychosociologie, volume 2015/I, numéro 19, pages 181-194, 2015.

http://www.cairn.info/article.php?
ID_ARTICLE=NRP_019_0181

Résumé ici de l’URL ci-dessus: « L’économie solidaire propose une définition du changement social qui tranche avec la manière dont celui-ci a été majoritairement pensé au XXe siècle et qui appelle une mise en perspective avec les approches du même concept par la psychosociologie. En préambule à un tel échange, il s’agit ici de retracer la genèse de la théorisation d’économie solidaire à partir d’événements définis au sens de ce numéro, c’est-à-dire des ruptures qui modifient la réflexion par leur surgissement inattendu. Le premier événement abordé dans les parties initiales de ce texte résulte de la confrontation avec l’autogestion yougoslave, puis la social-démocratie et l’économie sociale. Les deux dernières parties sont centrées sur le second événement générateur de l’économie solidaire comme tentative de théorisation d’une voie pour le changement social. Cet événement est de l’ordre de la mise en évidence des émergences : l’insistance des initiatives citoyennes prend sens par rapport à deux courants théoriques, l’un avec Mauss et Polanyi mettant l’accent sur la pluralité de l’économie, l’autre avec Habermas et Fraser mettant l’accent sur la pluralité du politique. »

 

 

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX