ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 9, NUMÉRO 7, JUILLET 2014

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Mechanisms, Roles, and Consequences of Governance: Emerging Issues. Studies in Public and Non-Profit Governance (Book)

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE Financement

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Women, shea, and finance: how institutional practices in a Malian cooperative create development impact

Social and solidarity economy for sustainable development: its premises – and the Social Economy Basel example of practice

Europe in Transition: The Role of Social Cooperatives and Social Enterprises

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Networking Modes and Performance in Israel's Nonprofit Organizations

Performance management and measurement in national-level non-profit sport organisations

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Time to raise the bar on nonprofit strategic planning and implementation

Micro-Level Interactions in Business–Nonprofit Partnerships

The implementation of an environmental management system in the not-for-profit sector

Does Charging Nonprofit Volunteers Affect Their Satisfaction?

Individual Preferences and Job Characteristics: An Analysis of Cooperative Credit Banks

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Co-operative Innovations in China and the West (Book)

Social Entrepreneur, Social Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise: Semantics and Controversies

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Nonprofits and Advocacy (Book)

Antecedents of Social Entrepreneurial Intentions: The Role of an Individual's General Social Appraisal

The feminine sector: explaining the overrepresentation of women in the nonprofit sector in the USA

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

Innovative Nonprofit Relationship Marketing Approaches

Cooperative banks

Cooperatives and Alternative Food Systems Initiatives

VARIA

Les facteurs de succès des entreprises d’économie sociale de la région de la Capitale-Nationale

Baromètre des entreprises sociales en Belgique

Proposed Approaches to Social Impact Measurement in European Commission legislation and in practice relating to: EuSEFs and the EaSI

ACTIVITÉS DE RECHERCHE ET DE FORMATION

Research and formation activities / Actividades de investigación y formación

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions/ Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Mechanisms, Roles, and Consequences of Governance: Emerging Issues. Studies in Public and Non-Profit Governance (Book)

Luca Gnan, Alessandro Hinna and Fabio Monteduro (eds). Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 250 pages, June 2014.

http://books.emeraldinsight.com/
display.asp?K=9781783507054

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This volume addresses emerging issues in public and non-profit governance research. Established concepts and theoretical issues are presented by established scholars in the governance, management and administration fields. These are set alongside highlighted emerging themes, and they're practicality illustrated through specific case examples. All papers in this volume have been double blind peer reviewed. Topics addressed include: The concept of board in the public sector, how to foster knowledge-intensive collaboration in the public sector, the development of the governance of regulatory networks, empirical research on non-profit boards, the relationship between governance and strategy in foundations, volunteer management and measurement systems.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE Financement

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

Women, shea, and finance: how institutional practices in a Malian cooperative create development impact

Amadou Sidibéa, Sietze Vellema, Fadiala Dembélé, Bino Témé, Harouna Yossi, Mamoudou Traoré and Thomas W. Kuyper. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, volume 12, issue 3, pages 263-275, July 2014.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/
content/tandf/ijas/2014/00000012/
00000003/art00006

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Development impacts are often framed in terms of the effects of exogenous inputs, such as finance or technologies, on measurable ultimate outcomes for a specified group of beneficiaries, for example increased income. This case study of sourcing, processing, and trading shea butter and kernels by a Malian women's cooperative emphasizes intermediate outcomes, specifically early signs of institutional change, as measures for assessing the development impacts of access to finance. The cooperative succeeded in obtaining working capital provided by a microfinance organization. The impact of this arrangement was most visible in how the provision of working capital catalysed emerging institutional practices within the cooperative, particularly in sourcing and stocking, which altered relations with non-members and traders. Hence, access to finance achieved an impact in terms of the interaction between the evolving strategies of the cooperative and the activities of people not directly included in the group-based activity itself.”

 

Social and solidarity economy for sustainable development: its premises – and the Social Economy Basel example of practice

Isidor Wallimann, International Review of Sociology, volume 24, issue 1, pages 48-58, 2014.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080
/03906701.2014.894345#.U8lQ2_l5Nyw

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The social and solidarity economy (SSE) is a viable strategy in dealing with some contemporary problems known both in industrial and developing countries. SSE is contextualized against the background of recent developments: the liberalization of goods and capital flows worldwide, continued industrialization, and the increased global division of labour. Addressed is how local populations could reach certain objectives and satisfy certain needs using techniques characteristic of SSE and, thus, carve out a social and economic space of their own vis-à-vis anonymous markets, global actors, and local and national elites. Within this self-governed space, it is suggested, a path can be laid for the necessary transition towards local, social, and ecological sustainability. The Social Economy Basel (SEB, founded 1996) will serve as an example to suggest how SSE principles could be operationalized into organizational practice.”

 

Europe in Transition: The Role of Social Cooperatives and Social Enterprises

Carlo Borzaga, Riccardo Bodini, Chiara Carini, Sara Depedri, Giulia Galera and Gianluca Salvatori. Euricse Working Paper, No. 69/14, 17  page, July 2014.

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/
papers.cfm?abstract_id=2436456

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The European social model has always been characterized by the active role played in the production of goods and services by a variety of organizations that differ both from private corporations and public institutions. These are private organizations that, while active on the market, typically pursue goals other than profit: their main purpose is not to generate financial gains for their owners or stakeholders but to provide goods and services either to their members or to the community at large. Traditionally, these organizations have been included in the concept of “social economy”. This paper describes the role of social enterprises and social cooperatives as a type of economic, non-profit organization that is assuming an increasingly central role in Europe (as shown for example by the Social Business Initiative, recently launched by the European Commission), by contributing to its economic and social growth. More generally, the paper intends to reflect on the economic and social impacts of social enterprises and social cooperatives in local economies, while some final remarks conclude by identifying some lessons supplied by Italian social cooperatives on a broader scale.

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

Networking Modes and Performance in Israel's Nonprofit Organizations

Rita S. Mano. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 24, issue 4, pages 429-444, Summer 2014.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
doi/10.1002/nml.21104/abstract
 

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The present article examines the relationship between networking modes and performance for 138 nonprofits in Israel. We draw upon the bridging and bonding concepts and social exchange theory and introduce the sharing and consulting networking modes to predict performance in terms of organizational growth in resources. We suggest that differences in networking modes (1) reflect variations in organizational size and age and (2) affect organizational growth in resources. We show that (1) the consulting networking mode is more frequent among managers of smaller and younger nonprofits, (2) sharing is characteristic of managers in older and larger nonprofits, (3) sharing has a strong effect on organizational growth, and (4) the sharing and consulting modes are better predictors of organizational performance than those of bonding and bridging. The results indicate that nonprofit growth in organizational resources is possible with networking when managers aspire to higher involvement in the networking process due to the scope and extent of goals.”

 

Performance management and measurement in national-level non-profit sport organisations

Ian O’Boyle and David Hassan. European Sport Management Quarterly, volume 14, issue 3, pages 299-314, May 2014.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/
content/routledg/esmq/2014/
00000014/00000003/art00007

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this research was to examine the current field of organisational performance management and measurement within non-profit sport organisations. This area of sport management is attracting a large growth in interest from the scholarly community and as such it is timely that such a review takes place. To conduct this research, an electronic search was adopted through SPORTDiscus and other academic databases to identify relevant studies within the field. The studies that met the criteria were those that focused on organisational performance management or measurement issues in line with definitions of these theoretical underpinnings described within the paper. Results show a number of studies focusing on various performances measurement criteria with fewer studies examining performance management from a more holistic organisational perspective. Moreover, the repetitive methodologies within the current body of literature, along with other limitations leaves clear gaps for future research to explore and thus facilitating the development of a new level of understanding and theory development within this emerging field of sport management research. A number of management implications such as the relationship between organisational performance and governance and the importance of individual performance management systems are addressed in the concluding sections of the paper.”

 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Time to raise the bar on nonprofit strategic planning and implementation

Margaret F. Reid, Lynne Brown, Denise McNerney and Dominic J. Perri. Strategy & Leadership, volume 42, issue 3, pages 31-39, June 2014.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/
journals.htm?articleid=17114944&
WT.mc_id=journaltocalerts

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This large-scale survey, initiated in 2012 and concluded in 2013, marked the first time a broad cross-section of the nonprofit community was asked to describe the strategic planning and strategic management practices they employ and to rate them for their impact on overall organizational success. Respondents were asked to self-rate their organization for overall success and the likelihood for continued success in the foreseeable future. Results from this data were then used as a filter to analyze practices across all responses by level of success (N = 507). Fully 93 percent of the most successful organizations, regardless of size or budget, credited their strategic planning and strategic-management efforts as having “some” to “critical” impact on their organization’s overall success. The evidence in this survey is so compelling that we believe the successful practices it identifies should be adopted by nonprofits of all sizes, demanded by boards, and supported by funders. This research indicates that funders should consider not only supporting strategic plan development, but also supporting development of ongoing plan management/implementation practices and requiring plan assessment reports/updates as part of the grantee’s reporting.”

 

Micro-Level Interactions in Business–Nonprofit Partnerships

Marlene Vock, Willemijn van Dolen and Ans Kolk. Business & Society, volume 53, issue 4, pages 517-550, July 2014.

http://bas.sagepub.com/
content/53/4/517?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “While most research on business–nonprofit partnerships has focused on macro and meso perspectives, this article pays attention to the micro level. Drawing on various theoretical perspectives from both marketing and management, this study conceptually relates the outcomes of active employee participation in such partnerships to consumer self-interest. This article also explores empirically whether and when self-interest affects consumers’ responses toward firms in relation to business–nonprofit partnerships. The study reveals that self-interest can directly influence consumers’ behavioral responses toward firms (i.e., switching and buying intentions, and word of mouth), whereas the impact on evaluative responses in terms of attitude and trust is only weak. The fit between the firm and the nonprofit partner (company–cause fit) turns out to moderate this effect, with consumer self-interest only playing a role if fit is high. Implications for research and practice are discussed.”

 

The implementation of an environmental management system in the not-for-profit sector

Gareth R.T. White, Matthew Lomax, Glenn Parry. Benchmarking: An International Journal, volume 21, issue 4, pages 509-526, July 2014.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/
content/mcb/131/2014/00000021/
00000004/art00002

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper aims to examine the implementation of the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) in a non-profit, small-to-medium sized-enterprise (SME) in the UK. A four-year participatory action research study is made upon knowledge transfer partnerships between the University of the West of England and the Royal Bath and West Society. Through the adoption of EMAS, the organisation was able to identify operational improvements as well as make significant efforts to improve its environmental performance, reducing its carbon footprint by 30 tCO2e per annum and gaining new business. The study is made upon a single not-for-profit organisation in the UK. It presents the costs, benefits and challenges that the organisation faced. Techniques that were used to successfully manage the environmental management systems (EMS) development are also discussed. The investigation identifies deficiencies in the materials that are provided to support companies that are seeking EMAS certification. To improve the uptake of these EMS and assist companies in their successful pursuit of ISO 14001 and EMAS, this supporting documentation requires enhancement. There has been relatively little empirical research around the development and benefits of organisational EMS. Even less has focussed upon the specific constraints and opportunities that face non-profit organisations when implementing EMAS. This paper addresses this gap, identifying its costs and tangible benefits.”

 

Does Charging Nonprofit Volunteers Affect Their Satisfaction?

Richard M. Clerkin and James E. Swiss. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 24, issue 4, pages 487-501, Summer 2014.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
doi/10.1002/nml.21106/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Nonprofits that offer volunteer experiences in foreign countries have long charged fees to their volunteers, but recently some other nonprofit organizations have begun to charge as well. Volunteer attitudes toward such fees have not previously been studied. Product marketing research has suggested that fees can sometimes improve participants’ evaluation of their experience, but public service motivation research seems to suggest that fees will diminish participants’ satisfaction. This study examines the attitudes toward fees of 4,400 volunteers who paid $310 to participate in a week-long project that built and repaired housing in Appalachia. Although a third of volunteers believed that the fee enhanced their appreciation of the program, an equal proportion disagreed. An even larger percentage of the volunteers believed the fee discouraged some volunteers. Concerns with fees were more common among youth volunteers than adult volunteers and among those who volunteered for altruistic rather than for career reasons. Most volunteers, even those critical of fees, were positive about their volunteer experience, but those who were least positive about the fees were also somewhat less positive about their experience. These results suggest that decisions about volunteer fees must balance the benefits of additional funds for enhanced client services against the likelihood of discouraging some potential volunteers, especially younger or more altruistic volunteers.”

 

Individual Preferences and Job Characteristics: An Analysis of Cooperative Credit Banks

Annamaria Nese and Roberta Troisi. LABOUR, volume 28, issue 2, pages 233-249, June 2014.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/
10.1111/labr.12026/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The aim of this paper is to analyse individual preferences in relation to different job characteristics. More specifically, this work focuses on the case of employees of cooperative credit banks (CCBs) in Campania and accounts for certain fundamental institutional features: CCBs are designed to pursue specific member interests rather than profit maximization, and most employees are both owners and consumers. The research is conducted by applying a conjoint analysis approach with stated preference data. Novel features of the analysis include the application of this approach to empirical research on worker incentives and the use of a mixed logit model.”

 

 

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

 

Co-operative Innovations in China and the West (Book)

Caroline Gijselinckx, Li Zhao and Sonja Novkovic (eds). Palgrave Macmillan, 312 pages, July 2014.

http://www.palgrave.com/page/
detail/cooperative-innovations-in-
china-and-the-west-caroline-gijselinckx/
?K=9781137277275

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The declaration of 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives by the general assembly of the United Nations highlights co-operative contributions to socio-economic development. Since its inception the co-operative movement included highly diverse co-operatives, with different aims, governance and financial structures. This is exemplified by differences between Western and Chinese cooperative traditions. Important economic and social transformations have led to radical innovations in the governance and capital structures of cooperatives, both in the West and in China, have been observed. Differences may remain but interesting convergences are also apparent. To date, little dialogue has taken place between Chinese and Western cooperatives. This book aims to contribute to our understanding of both those worlds and provides scholars, co-operative leaders and policy makers with relevant and useful information for further development of both Chinese and Western cooperatives.”

 

Social Entrepreneur, Social Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise: Semantics and Controversies

Francesca Petrella and Nadine Richez-Battesti. Journal of Innovation Economics & Management, volume 2014/2, issue 14, pages 143-156, June 2014.

http://www.cairn.info/article.php?
ID_REVUE=JIE&ID_NUMPUBLIE=JIE_014&
ID_ARTICLE=JIE_014_0143&WT.mc_id=JIE_014

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Social entrepreneurship is commonly used to qualify all entrepreneurial initiatives that serve a social and/or environmental mission and that reinvest a large part of their surpluses in support of their mission. Although this definition is not yet stabilised and its boundaries remain unclear, it focuses on the aim of achieving both economic efficiency and social purpose […]. This paper is structured as follows. The first section discusses the different notions used in the literature, sometimes indiscriminately, hiding some important differences and controversial issues. These notions are social entrepreneurship, social entrepreneur and social enterprise. The second section identifies the main elements of controversy between the different approaches to social entrepreneurship, social entrepeneur and social enterprise that we have identified.”

 

 

AUTRES

Other / Otros

 

Nonprofits and Advocacy (Book)

Robert J. Pekkanen, Steven Rathgeb Smith, and Yutaka Tsujinaka (eds). Johns Hopkins University Press, 320 pages, May 2014.

https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/
content/nonprofits-and-advocacy

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Questions abound: Should a nonprofit advocate for its mission and its constituents with a goal of affecting public policy? What are the limits of such advocacy work? Will such efforts fundamentally jeopardize nonprofit work? What can studies of nonprofit advocacy efforts reveal? Editors Robert J. Pekkanen, Steven Rathgeb Smith, and Yutaka Tsujinaka recognize the urgent need for relevant research and insight into these issues as direct and indirect government services are squeezed by federal cutbacks. Nonprofits and Advocacy defines advocacy and clarifies the differences among advocacy, lobbying, political activity, and education, as well as advocacy measurements.”

 

Antecedents of Social Entrepreneurial Intentions: The Role of an Individual's General Social Appraisal

Ronny Baierla, Dietmar Grichnik, Matthias Spörrle and Isabell M. Welpe. Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, volume 5, issue 2, pages 123-145, 2014.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/
abs/10.1080/19420676.2013.871324?
queryID=%24%7BresultBean.queryID%
7D#.U8lRx_l5Nyw

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This study addresses antecedents of social entrepreneurial intentions. First, this study argues that an individual's appraisal to become a social entrepreneur is an important predictor of social entrepreneurial intention. Second, this study hypothesizes that this general social appraisal moderates the influences of two opportunity characteristics on social entrepreneurial intention. In line with our main argument, the results of our empirical experiment show a positive influence of general social appraisal. In addition, this appraisal weakens the influence of perceived probability of success and strengthens the influence of perceived social impact on social entrepreneurial intention. This study concludes with a discussion of the important role of an individual's general social appraisal in research and practice.”

 

The feminine sector: explaining the overrepresentation of women in the nonprofit sector in the USA

Young-joo Lee. International Journal of Social Economics, volume 41, issue 7, pages 556-572, July 2014.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/
journals.htm?articleid=17115294&
WT.mc_id=journaltocalerts

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that affect a person's choice to work in a specific sector to understand the overrepresentation of women in the nonprofit sector in the USA. This study views a sector choice of prime-age salaried workers as a three-way choice among for-profit, nonprofit, and public sectors. One's choice of employment sector in this study depends on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, and is also shaped by structural factors. These benefits, in turn, tend to be determined by individual characteristics. Consequently, this study estimated the endogenous switching regression of earnings and sector choice. Results from 2003 to 2007 Current Population Survey (CPS) September supplement data indicate that the so-called “feminine” industries are concentrated in the nonprofit sector, and this gendered industry structure attributes to women's overrepresentation in the sector. The results also suggest that women with more education and experience may choose nonprofit jobs over jobs in the other sector while nonprofit employment is generally associated with negative wage differentials. This study does not model employers’ behaviors while gender segregation and discriminatory hiring practices may have contributed to women's overrepresentation in the nonprofit sector due to the lack of employer-side information in CPS. Consequently, the estimation of sector choice without employer information is likely to suffer from an endogeneity problem […].”

 

 

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

 

Innovative Nonprofit Relationship Marketing Approaches

Special issue of Issue International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector, volume 19, issue 2, May 2014.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
doi/10.1002/nvsm.v19.2/issuetoc

 

Cooperative banks

Special issue of the Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity, volume 3, issue 1, June 2014.

http://www.jeodonline.com./
issues/volume-3-issue-1-special-issue-cooperative-banks

 

Cooperatives and Alternative Food Systems Initiatives

Special issue of the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, volume 4, issue 3, Spring 2014.

http://www.agdevjournal.com/
volume-4-issue-3.html

 

 

VARIA

 

Les facteurs de succès des entreprises d’économie sociale de la région de la Capitale-Nationale

Conférence régionale des élus (CRÉ) de la Capitale-Nationale et Pôle régional d’économie sociale de la Capitale-Nationale (PRÉSCN), 2014.