ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 11, NUMÉRO 01, JANVIER 2016

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Managerial Objectives and the Governance of Public and Non-Profit Organizations

A Comparative Analysis of Nonprofit Policy Network Governance in Canada

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

The cooperative model of agri-food innovation systems: ANECOOP and the valencian citrus industry system

Role of Microfinance in Sustainable Development in Rural Bangladesh

Scaling Up: The Convergence of the Social Economy and Sustainability (Book)

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners

Differential Social Performance of Religiously-Affiliated Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) in Base of Pyramid (BoP) Markets

Social impact measurement in social enterprises: An interdependence perspective

Social Return on Investment Analysis

Measuring Social Enterprise Value Creation

Social Return on Investment of an Innovative Employment Option for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Cultivating Alliances: The Local Organic Food Co-ops Network

The Can Do Workplace: A Strengths Based Model for Non-Profits (Book)

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Understanding social change through catalytic innovation: Empirical findings in Mexican social entrepreneurship

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Adaptive utilitarianism, social enterprises and urban regeneration

Third Sector Organizations in Québec and the New Public Action in Community Development

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Social Economy in China and the World (Book)

Heading Toward a More Social Future? Scenarios for Social Enterprises in Germany

Social Enterprise in Québec: The Social Economy and the Social Enterprise Concepts

The Palgrave Handbook of Volunteering, Civic Participation, and Nonprofit Associations (Book)

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Health promotion interventions in social economy companies in Flanders (Belgium)

Staying Afloat While Stirring the Pot: Briarpatch Magazine and the Challenge of Nonprofit Journalism

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

Social entrepreneurship and environmental factors: Strict and broad dimensions

ACTIVITES DE RECHERCHE ET DE FORMATION

Research and formation activities/ actividades de investigaión y formación

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 


 

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and generalinterest / Gobernanza y interésgeneral

 

Managerial Objectives and the Governance of Public and Non-Profit Organizations

Stijn Van Puyvelde; Ralf Caers; Cind Du Bois and Marc Jegers. Public Management Review, volume 8, issue 2, pages 221-237, February 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg
/rpxm/2016/00000018/00000002/art00003

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:“By investigating managerial objectives, we test the simultaneous need for both control (agency theory) and collaboration (stewardship theory) in public and non-profit governance. We construct a discrete choice experiment to elicit preferences of managers in Belgian public and non-profit nursing homes. The results confirm that boards of nursing homes may experience pressure to simultaneously control and collaborate with their managers, thereby suggesting that agency and stewardship theory can be combined into a more general internal governance framework. We conclude by providing some policy implications to improve public and non-profit governance.”

 

A Comparative Analysis of Nonprofit Policy Network Governance in Canada

Peter Elson. Canadian Journal of Nonprofit and Social EconomyResearch\Revue canadienne de recherche sur les OBSL et l’économie sociale, volume 6, issue 2, pages 42-64, December 2015.

http://www.anserj.ca/anser/index.php
/cjnser/article/view/201

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Across Canada, provincial governments and nonprofit network leaders are engaged in a “third wave” of consultations, policy dialogues, and policy alignment strategies. Unexplored to date is how nonprofit policy networks are governed and structured. Network structures could have important implications for policy management and any bilateral collaboration agreements with provincial governments. This is a new point of analysis for both public administrators and nonprofit network leaders. The alignment of network governance in four structural dimensions is analyzed, as are parallel nonprofit policy network structures within provincial governments and select non-profit policy outcomes.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

The cooperative model of agri-food innovation systems: ANECOOP and the valencian citrus industry system 

Gallego-Bono J.R. andR. Chaves-Avila. ITEA. Informacion Tecnica Economica Agraria, volume 111, issue 4, pages 366-383, December 2015.

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84949653255&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&txGid=1B57
B7FA2CF96170D5FB7624F9CBD6DD.CnvicAmOODVwpVrjSeqQ%3a1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Globalisation brings pressure on regional production systems to become regional production and innovation systems in order to maintain their competitiveness. However, the heterogeneity of the companies in these systems makes it difficult to respond to these challenges and obliges the response to be collective and mesoeconomic. To date, there has been a defence of the leadership of some private companies and other intermediaries such as business associations as vehicles of this process, but the part that cooperatives play in it has barely been studied. This paper therefore pursues a double aim. Firstly, it undertakes a novel conceptualisation of the cooperatives’ capacity for transforming regional production systems into innovation systems. Combining an evolutionary approach with that of governance and the collective entrepreneurship of the social economy brings to light a truly cooperative “third way” (between private and public) to transform these systems through a cooperative model of an innovation system that is capable of generating new meso-rules. Secondly, based on 218 in-depth interviews with different players in the Valencian citrus industry, it shows how the second-tier cooperative ANECOOP has led the shaping of a cooperative model of an innovation system. As a result, in response to the new demands of growers, packers and marketers for scientific and technical knowledge, new routines and forms of organisation have arisen through the interaction and redefinition of the communities of practice and the epistemic communities.”

 

Role of Microfinance in Sustainable Development in Rural Bangladesh

MohummedShofiUllahMazumder. Sustainable Development, volume 23, issue 6, pages 396-413, November/December 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sd.1599/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Here, the effects of length of microfinance borrowing, service provider and other factors on microfinance participation and outcomes in Bangladesh are investigated. Data were collected from 300 microfinance respondents using face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Descriptive and econometric statistics were used for data analysis. The financing authorities gave preference to rural, powerless, illiterate and poor people in all groups of candidates. Spillover effects were minimized by considering endogeneity, attrition bias and unobserved bias. The fixed effect instrumental variable method was used to show that the microfinance effects changed over time, i.e. were greater in historical borrowing than in more recent borrowing. Farm size, repayment behavior, savings amount per week and annual household income were identified as significant factors that influenced recipients’ effective participation in the microfinance program.”

 

Scaling Up: The Convergence of the Social Economy and Sustainability (Book)

Mike Gismondi and Mary Beckie.  AU Press, 380 pages, January 2016.

http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120246

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: When citizens take collaborative action to meet the needs of their community, they are participating in the social economy. Co-operatives, community-based social services, local non-profit organizations, and charitable foundations are all examples of social economies that emphasize mutual benefit rather than the accumulation of profit. While such groups often participate in market-based activities to achieve their goals, they also pose an alternative to the capitalist market economy. Contributors to Scaling Up investigated innovative social economies in British Columbia and Alberta and discovered that achieving a social good through collective, grassroots enterprise resulted in a sustainable way of satisfying human needs that was also, by extension, environmentally responsible. As these case studies illustrate, organizations that are capable of harnessing the power of a social economy generally demonstrate a commitment to three outcomes: greater social justice, financial self-sufficiency, and environmental sustainability. Within the matrix of these three allied principles lie new strategic directions for the politics of sustainability. Whether they were examining attainable and affordable housing initiatives, co-operative approaches to the provision of social services, local credit unions, farmers' markets, or community-owned power companies, the contributors found social economies providing solutions based on reciprocity and an understanding of how parts function within the whole - an understanding that is essential to sustainability. In these locally defined and controlled, democratically operated organizations we see possibilities for a more human economy that is capable of transforming the very social and technical systems that make our current way of life unsustainable.”

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners

Anna Katharina Höchstädter and Barbara Scheck.Journal of Business Ethics.volume 132, issue 2, pages 449-475, December 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-014-2327-0

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:Recently, there has been much talk of impact investing. Around the world, specialized intermediaries have appeared, mainstream financial players and governments have become involved, renowned universities have included impact investing courses in their curriculum, and a myriad of practitioner contributions have been published. Despite all this activity, conceptual clarity remains an issue: The absence of a uniform definition, the interchangeable use of alternative terms and unclear boundaries to related concepts such as socially responsible investment are being criticized. This article aims to contribute to a better understanding of impact investing, which could help foster this specific investment style and guide further academic research. To do so, it investigates a large number of academic and practitioner works, highlighting areas of similarity and inconsistency on three levels: definitional, terminological, and strategic. Our research shows that, on a general level, heterogeneity—especially definitional and strategic—is less pronounced than expected. Yet, our research also reveals critical issues that need to be clarified to advance the field and increase its credibility. First and foremost, this includes the characteristics required of impact investees, notably whether they need to be (social sector) organizations that prioritize their non-financial mission over the business side. Our results indicate that there may be different schools of thoughts concerning this matter.”

 

Differential Social Performance of Religiously-Affiliated Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) in Base of Pyramid (BoP) Markets

Mitch Casselman R., Linda M. Sama and Abraham Stefanidis.Journal of Business Ethics, volume 132, issue 3, pages 539-552, December 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-014-2360-z
?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “As the debate over the value of microfinance institutions (MFIs) intensifies, it remains apparent that microfinance may, at the very least, be considered as one tool in the arsenal of the war against poverty in base of pyramid (BoP) markets. Given the variety of actors in the microfinance arena, stakeholders have placed a relatively new emphasis on performance reporting for MFIs, allowing comparisons and identifications of performance gaps. One result of this scrutiny is an increased importance placed on MFIs’ social performance, with an eye to understanding measures of MFIs’ intent, process, and results in the social realm—in addition to their financial sustainability. While a number of factors may explain differences in social performance, in this paper we take a close look at a particular factor that may have a positive relationship with social performance—that of an MFI’s religious affiliation or religiosity. Using archival data, we derived three sets of randomly paired samples, pairing religious MFIs with non-religious ones, and compared social performance indicators derived from the literature across the samples. We sought to understand whether religiously-affiliated MFIs would, in fact, demonstrate stronger social performance intent, wider social performance reach via service delivery processes, and better social performance outcomes in BoP markets. Statistical analysis provided preliminary evidence that religiously-affiliated MFIs display stronger social performance, suggesting new avenues for future research.”

 

Social impact measurement in social enterprises: An interdependence perspective

Nguyen Linh, SzkudlarekBetina and Seymour G. Richard.Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences, volume 32, issue 4, pages 224- 237, December 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/cjas
/2015/00000032/00000004/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:“In response to recent calls for a better understanding of the connection between social enterprises and their environments, we focus on the influence of funding relationships on social impact measurement in social enterprises in Vietnam. We utilize resource dependence theory and take a multiple case study approach to explore the issue. The findings suggest that in order to understand and explain the social impact measurement behaviours of social enterprises and funding organizations, it is critical to understand the interdependence of the parties rather than focus on the technical issue of measurement alone. The paper contributes to the relatively scant but burgeoning theoretical foundations of the social impact measurement and social entrepreneurship domains.”

 

Social Return on Investment Analysis

Marlene Walk, Itay Greenspan, Honey Crossley and Femida Handy.Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 26, issue 2, pages 129-144, December 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nml.21190
/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:This article uses a social return on investment (SROI) methodology to analyze the social impact of a social enterprise offering a job and skills training program to an unemployed, largely female population. The social enterprise is based in Toronto (Canada) and run by a nonprofit agency dedicated to the advancement and empowerment of women, primarily immigrants, through access to employment. We focus our analysis on a job and skills training program that provides clients with the skills and tools that they need to successfully seek employment in their efforts to (re-)enter the Canadian labor market. Our goal is to determine the tangible and intangible program outcomes by applying and testing the SROI methodology.”

 

Measuring Social Enterprise Value Creation

Laurie Mook, Andrea Chan and Dan Kershaw.Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 26, issue 2, pages 189-207, December 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nml.
21185/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:This article presents a case study that explores the creation of value by a social enterprise, Furniture Bank, for its stakeholders. The study is undertaken using the social return on investment framework. The case highlights insights and caveats that resulted from undertaking this type of analysis. This article calls for an integrated approach to social return on investment processes, incorporating both conventional accounting and social accounting.”

 

Social Return on Investment of an Innovative Employment Option for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

Frances Owen, Jingyu Li, Lisa Whittingham, Jennifer Hope, Courtney Bishop, Anne Readhead and Laurie Mook.Nonprofit Management and Leadership, volume 26, issue 2, pages 209-228, December 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nml.
21187/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Common Ground Co-operative (CGC) provides training, administrative, and job coach support to five social enterprises for which persons with developmental disabilities are the non-share-capital partners. This study examines the use of social return on investment (SROI) as a means of determining the value of program impacts related to quality-of-life changes for enterprise partners and their families. The process of conducting this SROI analysis is described and analyzed in terms of its utility in employment services for persons with developmental disabilities.”

 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Cultivating Alliances: The Local Organic Food Co-ops Network

Jennifer Sumner and Cassie Wever.Canadian journal of nonprofit and social  economyresearch\ Revue canadienne de recherche sur les OBSL et l’économie sociale, volume 6, issue 2, pages65-79, December 2015.

http://www.anserj.ca/anser/index.php/cjnser/article/view/204

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Although social movements can lose their way in neoliberal times, building alliances can help them to leverage their strengths and overcome their weaknesses, thus avoiding co-optation and “mission drift.” One example of this strategy can be found within the co-operative movement: the Local Organic Food Co-ops Network in Ontario. A pilot study of six co-operatives in this organization reveals that they cultivate alliances in four ways: among member co-ops, through the creation of the network, with other types of organizations, and with other social movements. These alliances strengthen the co-operative movement, help to make the politics of alternative food systems work, influence the economy toward co-operation, and open up possibilities for establishing and maintaining a more sustainable food system.”

 

The Can Do Workplace: A Strengths Based Model for Non-Profits (Book)

CathiCoridan. Motivational Press, 142 pages, January 2015.

http://www.coridanconsulting.com/news-publications/can-do-workplace

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: It is a book designed for nonprofit leaders and manager who want: your nonprofit and the people you serve to be more successful; to reduce workplace stress and increase productivity; the outcomes of your programs and services to make real, meaningful and lasting impact for your clients, your employees and your community; and to build and maintain "connected relationships" that bring hope and success. The Can Do Workplace combines concepts and practices with how-to applications to help employees at all levels of an organization work toward success with excellence. It focuses on possibilities and demonstrates the importance of building on a foundation of gratitude and mission. The four "case stories" illustrate the work and feature the voices of the people from four diverse, exemplary Can Do nonprofits from around the world.  The chapter on "Lessons Learned" reminds us of our need to build and maintain a culture of inquiry at all levels of the organization. The Can Do Workplace: A Strengths-Based Model for Nonprofits is a great resource for nonprofit managers and leaders, Board members and Execs.  There is a starting point for everyone to build connected relationships that can, literally, change the world for the people served by, and serving in, the nonprofit sector.” 

 

 

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

 

Understanding social change through catalytic innovation: Empirical findings in Mexican social entrepreneurship

Caroline Auvinet and Antonio Lloret. Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences / Revue Canadienne des Sciences de l'Administration, volume 32, issue 4, pages 238-251, December 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cjas.1353/abstract

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Christensen, Baumann, Ruggles, and Sadtler (2006) proposed that organizations addressing social problems may use catalytic innovation as a strategy to create social change. These innovations aim to create scalable, sustainable, and systems-changing solutions. This empirical study examines: (a) whether catalytic innovation applies to Mexican social entrepreneurship; (b) whether those who adopt Christensen et al.’s (2006) strategy generate more social impact; and (c) whether they demonstrate economic success. We performed a survey of 219 Mexican social entrepreneurs and found that catalytic innovation does occur within social entrepreneurship, and that those social entrepreneurs who use catalytic innovations not only maximize their social impact but also maximize their profits, and that they do so with diminishing returns to scale.”

 

 

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / PoliticasPublicas

 

Adaptive utilitarianism, social enterprises and urban regeneration 

Murtagh, B.and K. McFerran. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, volume 33, issue 6, pages 1585-1599, December 2015.

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84949448721&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&txGid=1B57
B7FA2CF96170D5FB7624F9CBD6DD.CnvicAmOODVwpVrjSeqQ%3a10

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Social enterprises have been placed at the centre of Big Society politics and an emphasis on the local as a site for experimentation and service delivery. Nationally, this has been supported by legislation in community transfer and procurement, social finance and new intermediaries to strengthen skills and loan readiness. This paper examines the role of social enterprises involved in urban development in Northern Ireland and highlights the multiple ethics, legitimation strategies and modalities that are necessary for sustainable forms of progressive regeneration. The paper concludes by stressing the possibilities of a more independent and reformist social economy and how this offers some practical alternatives to the enthusiasm for neoliberal policies in the local state.”

 

Third Sector Organizations in Québec and the New Public Action in Community Development

Sebastien Savard, Denis Bourque and René Lachapelle. Canadian journal of nonprofit and social  economyresearch\ Revue canadienne de recherche sur les OBSL et l’économie sociale, volume 6, issue 2, pages 28-41, December 2015.

http://www.anserj.ca/anser/index.php/cjnser/article/view/191

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:This article presents the context for and particular relations between the state and third-sector organizations in the province of Québec. A typology inspired by Coston and developed by Proulx, Bourque, and Savard is used to describe interactions between these actors. The article documents how an agreement that the private Fondation Lucie et André Chagnon signed with the Government of Québec had an impact on community organizations that respond to the social needs of vulnerable groups. A major repercussion has been the relegation of third-sector organizations to a model between subcontracting and coproductive. This is notable, as the sector had managed to establish itself as a central actor during the previous twenty years, particularly in health and social services, participating in the co-construction of public policies.”

 

 

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

 

Social Economy in China and the World (Book)

Pun N., B.H.B. Ku, H. Yan and A. Koo. Routledge Edition,290 pages, August 2015

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138857971

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Thirty-years of economic transformation has turned China into one of the major players in the global capitalist economy. However, its economic growth has generated rising problems in inequality, alienation, and sustainability with the agrarian crises of the 1990s giving rise to real social outcry to the extent that they became the object of central government policy reformulations. Contributing to a paradigm-shift in the theory and practices of economic development, this book examines the concept of social economy in China and around the world. It offers to rethink space, economy and community in a trans-border context which moves us beyond both planned and market economies. The chapters address theoretical issues, critical reflections and case studies on the practice of social economy in the context of globalization and its attempt to create an alternative modernity. Through this, the book builds a platform for further cross-disciplinary and cross-boundary dialogue on the future of social economy in China and the world. With examples from Asia, North America, Latin America and Europe this book will not only appeal to students and scholars of Chinese and Asian social policy and development, but also those of social economy from an international perspective.

Heading Toward a More Social Future? Scenarios for Social Enterprises in Germany

Henning Engelke, Stefanie Mauksch, Inga-Lena Darkow and Heiko von der Gracht.Business & Society, volume 55, issue 1, page 56-89, January 2016.

http://bas.sagepub.com/content/55/1/56?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:In recent years, the public sector in many countries has had difficulty keeping abreast of social problems due to restricted financial resources and limited organizational capacities. As a consequence, entrepreneurs have started to address social welfare issues that the public sector has been unable to tackle with an innovative approach called social enterprise. The authors present research on the future prospects of social enterprise as a sustainable business model for industrialized countries. As there is a lack of historical and current data, the authors aim to contribute to and structure the debate about the potential of the concept. Therefore, the authors provide initial data from a Delphi survey on the future development of social enterprise in a multistakeholder environment. Experts from academia, business, nongovernmental and governmental organizations, social enterprise investors, and social entrepreneurs evaluated 16 projections for the year 2030. Based on these results, the authors present comprehensive scenarios of four different possible developments of the future of social enterprise in Germany.”

 

Social Enterprise in Québec: The Social Economy and the Social Enterprise Concepts

Marie J. Bouchard, Paulo Cruz Filho and Tassadit Zerdani.International Comparative Social Enterprise Models (ICSEM) Working Papers, issue 23, 27 pages, January 2016.

http://www.iap-socent.be/sites/default/files/Canada%20%
28Quebec%29%20-%20Bouchard%20et%20al.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article explores how the social enterprise concept is used in Québec. Focusing on the historical, institutional, and current conceptual understanding of the social economy in Québec, it explores the related definitions, terminology, and typologies currently in use. The term “social enterprise” is nearly absent in Québec, mainly due to the highly recognized notion of social economy. However, not all Québec enterprises that pursue social goals fit into the social economy institutional definition. This article proposes a conceptual framework for understanding the modalities of Québec’s field of social economy and other social purpose enterprises. It suggests that “social enterprises” in Québec are those that participate in the social purposes of the social economy without necessarily sharing the core and institutionalized characteristics of social economy enterprises.”

 


 

 

The Palgrave Handbook of Volunteering, Civic Participation, and Nonprofit Associations (Book)

David Horton Smith, Robert A. Stebbins and JurgenGrotz. Palgrave Macmillan, 1144 pages, January 2016.

https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/the-palgrave
-handbook-of-volunteering/9781137263162-item.html

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Written by over 200 leading experts from over seventy countries, this handbook provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art overview of the latest theory and research on volunteering, civic participation and nonprofit membership associations. The first handbook on the subject to be truly multinational and interdisciplinary in its authorship, it represents a major milestone for the discipline. Each chapter follows a rigorous theoretical structure examining definitions, historical background, key analytical issues, usable knowledge, and future trends and required research. The nine parts of the handbook cover the historical and conceptual background of the discipline; special types of volunteering; the major activity areas of volunteering and associations; influences on volunteering and association participation; the internal structures of associations; the internal processes of associations; the external environments of associations; the scope and impacts of volunteering and associations; and conclusions and future prospects. This handbook provides an essential reference work for third-sector research and practice, including a valuable glossary of terms defining over eighty key concepts. Sponsored by the International Council of Voluntarism, Civil Society, and Social Economy Researcher Associations (ICSERA; www.icsera.org), it will appeal to scholars, policymakers and practitioners, and helps to define the emergent academic discipline of voluntaristics.”