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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 11, NUMÉRO 12, DÉCEMBRE 2016

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Evolution in Board Chair–CEO Relationships. A Negotiated Order Perspective

Governance, legitimacy, and stakeholder balance: lessons from Fairtrade International

The Government of Possible Social and Solidary Economy, Subject and Power

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Disentangling the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofits

Co‐operative Working in Aged Care: The Cooperative for Healthy Ageing Research and Teaching Project

Social Venture Creation and the Influence of Commercial Ventures

Funding and Financial Regulation for Third Sector Broadcasters: What Can Be Learned From the Australian and Canadian Experiences?

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Understanding Nonprofit Financial Health. Exploring the Effects of Organizational and Environmental Variables

Exploring the Nexus of Nonprofit Financial Stability and Financial Growth

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Measuring Changes in Farmers’ Attitudes to Agricultural Cooperatives: Evidence from Swedish Agriculture 1993–2013

What Motivates Employees to Engage in the Social Economy Sector? A Case Study of Greek Cooperative Enterprises

Meaning or Money? Non-profit Employee Satisfaction

Nonprofit Brand Heritage: Its Ability to Influence Volunteer Retention, Engagement, and Satisfaction

The Relationship Between Disclosure and Household Donations to Nonprofit Organizations in Australia

Resisting Hybridity in Community-Based Third Sector Organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand

A Review of Research on Nonprofit Communications from Mission Statements to Annual Reports

Symbiosis Across Institutional Logics in a Social Enterprise

Sensegiving, Leadership, and Nonprofit Crises: How Nonprofit Leaders Make and Give Sense to Organizational Crisis

Ideology, Practice, and Process? A Review of the Concept of Managerialism in Civil Society Studies

De la cooperativa agroalimentaria a la "learning netchain". Hacia un planteamiento teorico interorganizativo e interpersonal

Sink or Swim: Social Enterprise as a Panacea for Non‐profit Organisations?

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Social Innovation and Development Policies: The Case of Land Exchange (Bolsa de Terras)

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

The Development of the Social Economy in the Welfare Mix: Political Dynamics Between the State and the Third Sector

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Leaving a Social Venture: Social Entrepreneurial Exit among the Maasai in Northern Tanzania

The Role of Institutional and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping Social Enterprise Ecosystems in Europe

Autres

Other / Otros

Économie collaborative et (in)justice sociale

Testing an Economic Model of Nonprofit Growth: Analyzing the Behaviors and Decisions of Nonprofit Organizations, Private Donors, and Governments

Varia

Synthèse sur le changement d’échelle et la maximisation de l’impact des entreprises sociales. Politiques d’entrepreneuriat social

Mode d'emploi : la création d'activités d'utilité sociale

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 


 

 

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Evolution in Board Chair–CEO Relationships. A Negotiated Order Perspective

Chris Cornforth and Rob Macmillan. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 5, pages 949–970, October 2016.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0899764015622705

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:The relationship between chairs and chief executive officers (CEOs) has been largely neglected in research on nonprofit governance. Yet, a growing body of research on corporate governance in the private and public sectors suggests that this relationship is crucial both to the effective functioning of the board and the leadership of the organization. Much of the research on chair–CEO relationships has used cross-sectional research designs ignoring the fact that these relationships will evolve over time. This article responds to some of these challenges. It presents the results from longitudinal research examining the relationship between the chair and chief executive in a nonprofit organization. It shows how this relationship is “negotiated” and develops over time in response to contextual changes.”

 

Governance, Legitimacy, and Stakeholder Balance: Lessons from Fairtrade International

Elizabeth A. Bennett. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 12, issue 3, pages 322-346, December 2016

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/
10.1108/SEJ-08-2016-0038

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper aims to explain why Fairtrade International (FI), an organization committed to empowering the producers of Fairtrade certified products, at times (paradoxically), excluded them from its highest bodies of governance. A within-case study of Fairtrade’s inclusive and exclusive reforms over 25 years, along with insights from the social enterprise, hybrid governance and political sociology literatures, is used to generate several propositions about how voluntary sustainability standards-setting organizations (VSSSOs) engage stakeholders – especially producers – in governance. This study uses process-tracing methodology, which focuses on the sequential, intervening processes that link potentially important variables within a single case. It draws on data from over 100 interviews and nearly 6,000 archival documents collected from FI and its member Max Havelaar Netherlands. Causal process observations were extracted from the documents and compiled to create a 68,000-word chronological narrative used to evaluate six potential explanations of Fairtrade’s governance reforms: legitimacy, resources, identity, oligarchic tendency, leadership and producer mobilization. This study finds that Fairtrade’s inclusion/exclusion of producers reflected its desire to increase its moral legitimacy among external actors and understanding of how to signal legitimacy. The discussion proposes that VSSSOs, especially in times of heightened competition, leverage their comparative advantages to differentiate themselves from other organizations. In cases (like FI) in which the advantage is legitimacy, changing notions of legitimacy may have a destabilizing effect on governance. This evidence-based account of FI’s governance decisions should help resolve some debates about the nature of FI’s relationship with producer groups. The broader propositions offer guidance for future cross-case research aiming to explain VSSSOs’ governance structure and hybrid governance, more generally. Because FI includes producers in governance to a much greater extent than most VSSSOs, it is an important case.”

 

The Government of Possible Social and Solidary Economy, Subject and Power

Presta, S. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Politicas y Sociales, volume 61, issue 227, pages 325-348, May 2016.

https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84995912114&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&dgcid=&txGid
=6385ED56F77C01796B9EC952691F0C90.wsnAw8kcdt7IPYLO0V48gA%3a1

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The changes in the socio-economic processes in recent decades have increased various initiatives within the social and solidary economy that open up new problematic areas regarding to the naturalization forms present in the “new social issue”: the emphasis on feelings and human passions and changes in power relations. Our hypothesis lies in the transformation of the forms of workforce government pointing to the government of the potential of social relations, which we will call the government of possible. “Social” is constituted as an area to build new local relationships in an environment governed by inequality and competition. Our fieldwork in an initiative framed in the social economy, allow us to build some theoretical and philosophical critical reflections in relation to the changes in the forms of workforce government. In this sense, we will analyze some background on the idea of “desire” from the philosophy of Spinoza, and resignifications in the Theory of Human Action, by von Mises, in the context of neoliberal rationality of government.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

Disentangling the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofits

Pablo de Andres-Alonso, Inigo Garcia-Rodriguez and M. Elena Romero-Merino. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages, 2539–2560, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-016
-9764-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This research analyzes the concept of financial vulnerability of nonprofits in depth. We review the definitions given by the prior literature, concluding that none of them is complete. We propose a definition in which financial vulnerability consists of three dimensions: operational (variation of net assets over time), leverage (relationship between total assets and debt), and liquidity (ratio of current assets to short-term debt). We use a sample of 212 Non-Governmental Development Organizations (NGDOs) from the United Kingdom to analyze these measures, observing a limited number of nonprofits simultaneously classified as vulnerable   find that 6 % of the sample is highly financially vulnerable according to the three dimensions, and a high proportion (18 %) of nonprofits is simultaneously vulnerable in leverage and liquidity dimensions. Finally, we compare the obtained results using traditional variables and those derived from our model.”

 

Co‐operative Working in Aged Care: The Cooperative for Healthy Ageing Research and Teaching Project

Maggie Jamieson, Laurie Grealish. Australasian Journal on Ageing, volume 35, issue 3, pages 1440-6381, September 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bsc/aja
/2016/00000035/00000003/art00005

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The objective of this study was to describe the partnership mechanisms that supported teaching and research in aged care, in one of the 16 funded projects under the auspices of the Teaching and Research in Aged Care Service project. Located in ACT and southern NSW, the Co‐operative for Healthy Ageing Research and Teaching (CHART) was comprised of eleven partners from the residential care sector, higher education, and hospital and non‐government sectors.”

 

Social Venture Creation and the Influence of Commercial Ventures

Habib Kachlami. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 12, issue 3, pages 347-367, December 2016.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/SEJ-02-2016-0006

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this paper is to understand how social and commercial ventures interact with each other. It investigates how the entry, exit and prevalence of commercial ventures in a given region can influence the creation of social ventures. Market failure theory has been used as a framework for analysing the interaction between social and commercial ventures. The results of the theoretical analysis were further empirically examined using a large-scale database covering all 290 municipalities in Sweden from 1990 to 2014 and applying the panel-corrected standard errors method. The results of this study, in general, reveal a competition between social and commercial ventures. Its specific results, however, are related to influences that the entry, exit and prevalence of commercial ventures can have on the creation of social ventures. The study’s results reveal that while the entry and prevalence of commercial ventures in a region negatively influence the creation of social ventures, commercial ventures’ exits have a positive influence. Within social entrepreneurship literature, this is the first study that empirically investigates the influence of commercial ventures’ entry and exit on social venture creation and the second study to investigate the influence of commercial ventures’ prevalence on social venture creation. It is also the first of such studies in the Swedish context. The study is also unique due to the large-scale database it uses.”

 

 

Funding and Financial Regulation for Third Sector Broadcasters: What Can Be Learned From the Australian and Canadian Experiences?

Fernando Méndez Powell. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2595–2616, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-016-9695-2?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The article takes an in-depth look at the experiences Australia and Canada have had dealing with issues related to the funding and financial regulation of the third or ‘private, non-profit’ sector of broadcasting. Through the analysis of these experiences, recommendations are extracted aimed at providing policy makers and stakeholders from other jurisdictions guidance regarding how to deal with these issues.”

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

Understanding Nonprofit Financial Health. Exploring the Effects of Organizational and Environmental Variables

Christopher R. Prentice. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 5, pages 888–909, December 2016.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0899764015601243

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Using Internal Revenue Service Form 990 information for all filing 501(c)(3) organizations from 1998 to 2003, this article explores the organizational and environmental factors that affect nonprofit financial health in two subsectors—human services and higher education. The results yield three noteworthy findings. First, theory and empirical data converge when four commonly used financial indicators are combined to form a single financial health construct. Second, accounting measures and revenue variables are not as clearly related to financial health as the literature suggests. Third, environmental variables including macroeconomic factors (gross domestic product and state product), community factors (median household income), as well as a nonprofit’s financial prominence in their policy area (revenue share) are strong predictors of nonprofit financial health. This research contributes to the literature in several ways, most notably by incorporating a more open-systems approach to the study of nonprofit financial health with the inclusion of several environmental variables.”

 

Exploring the Nexus of Nonprofit Financial Stability and Financial Growth

Grace L. Chikoto-Schultz and Daniel Gordon Neely. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2561–2575, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-016-9786-0

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Taking a unified approach to studying nonprofit financial health, this research tackles a key question that has remained unexplored in the literature: “What lies at the intersection of the two key dimensions of financial health–financial stability and financial growth?” Specifically, we identify and compare nonprofits that exhibit high levels of financial stability and growth (high financially performing) to those that exhibit low levels (low financially performing)? Overall, we find that high financial performers (HFPs) tend to be older and larger organizations (in terms of unrestricted net assets and total revenue). HFPs are also more likely to report capital assets, and report high levels of compensation. Finally, HFPs tend to contain their overhead spending by exercising efficiency by investing in talented officers (paying more than the rest), but limiting the share of officer compensation, administrative, and fundraising expenses, as a percentage of total expenses. The results of the study should be informative to stakeholders attempting to understand the profile of an organization that is successfully able to achieve both capacity growth and financial stability.”

 

 


 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Measuring Changes in Farmers’ Attitudes to Agricultural Cooperatives: Evidence from Swedish Agriculture 1993–2013

Karin Hakeliusand Helena Hansson. Agribusiness, volume 32, issue 4, pages 531-546, November 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/agr/
2016/00000032/00000004/art00007

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This study assessed changes in farmers’ attitudes to agricultural cooperatives by developing a behavioral framework based in psychological and psychometric theory for measuring attitude change. The assessment focused on a unique dataset that allowed attitude coverage and strength of evaluation derived from data collected in 1993 and in 2013 to be evaluated. Explorative factor analytical methods revealed the attitude construct to be two‐dimensional in both datasets, covering the domains named “Commitment” and “Trust” in both cases. Thus, the coverage of the attitude construct seemed unchanged. However, the strength of evaluation of both attitude dimensions was significantly increased. These findings have clear policy implications for agricultural cooperatives, since understanding the nature of changes in attitudes to these organizations is important for their successful development.”

 

What Motivates Employees to Engage in the Social Economy Sector? A Case Study of Greek Cooperative Enterprises

Despina Sdrali, Maria Goussia-Rizou, Panagiota Giannouli and Konstantinos Makris. International Journal of Social Economics, volume 43, issue 12, pages 1334-1350, December 2016.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/
10.1108/IJSE-10-2014-0212

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Social economy employees focus on personal fulfillment and social good rather than economic gains. They prefer to work in a sector that promotes satisfaction and makes them feel worthy. The purpose of this paper is to investigate employees’ motivations to engage in the social economy sector, especially in a period of financial downturn in Greece. Furthermore, the impact of specific demographic characteristics on employees’ work motivation is examined. The research participants included 200 employees of worker cooperatives and social cooperative enterprises. A survey was conducted by collecting primary data and using a close-ended type questionnaire. According to the findings, intrinsic forces motivate the employees to a greater extent toward social economy sector than economic ones. However, the replacement of the profit motivation from the main concern, it does not mean that the employees are not interested in financials. The survey also indicated that the most important barrier for starting to work in the social economy sector is the difficulty in finding partners. Finally, the findings showed that demographic characteristics partially influence work motivations of Greek employees on the social economy sector. The results of this study may interest employers in finding new ways to motivate employees toward social economy sector under economic crisis conditions.”

 

Meaning or Money? Non-profit Employee Satisfaction

Melinda Weisberg and Eric Dent. Voluntary Sector Review, volume 7, issue 3, pages 2040-8056, November 2016.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/
vsr/2016/00000007/00000003/art00004

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Employees choosing careers with community-based non-profit human services organisations engaged in meeting human needs expecting intrinsic satisfaction often find that the same care and commitment espoused in mission statements are not reflected internally as a commitment to employee satisfaction. These frontline workers are at risk of becoming disillusioned by increasing demands for compliance, internal and external disparities in salaries, unpaid work hours and difficulties in achieving outcomes. Using Herzberg's two-factor theory as a framework, this article incorporates a systematic review of literature per the discipline of evidence-based research to examine the potential of applying non-monetary satisfiers to invigorate the human services workforce. The article, which includes recommendations for management, focuses on the environment for frontline workers and includes creating a flexible workplace as well as implementing best practices for intentionally engaging employees in decision making and problem solving. The article has global relevance for staff retention and job satisfaction issues.”

 

 


 

 

Nonprofit Brand Heritage: Its Ability to Influence Volunteer Retention, Engagement, and Satisfaction

Ross Curran, Babak Taheri, Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O’Gorman. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 6, pages 1234–1257, December 2016.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/
0899764016633532?etoc
=

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Volunteer organizations operate in a challenging environment and their management practices toward volunteers have become increasingly influenced by the private sector. This case study explores the impact of brand heritage on the experience of volunteering in such managed environments. We use data from the U.K. Scouts to show that brand heritage has a positive bearing on the level of engagement volunteers experience and on their reported attitude to the way(s) in which they are managed within the volunteer organization. We then use these findings to establish the salience of brand heritage to both long established and recently formed organizations, extending current volunteer management theory; consequently, we suggest volunteer managers utilize the power of brand heritage through unlocking its ability to retain engaged and satisfied volunteers.”

 

The Relationship Between Disclosure and Household Donations to Nonprofit Organizations in Australia

Debbie Haski-Leventhal and Christine Foot.  Christine Foot.  Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 45, issue 5, pages 992- 1012, October 2016.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0899764016628673

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Based on the signaling theory and its application in nonprofit organizations, this study examines the relationship between disclosure in nonprofits and ability to attract household donations. Based on 50 random Australian nonprofits, scores were assigned for fiduciary, financial, performance, and total disclosure. A significant correlation was observed between the extent of total household donations received and a change in marketing and fundraising spend. However, there was no significant relationship identified between total household donations and disclosure. As disclosure does not seem to be rewarded by household donors, this article discusses the potential for a national educational campaign to inform donors of the increasing accessibility of this type of information, the benefits of utilizing this type of information, and how best to use it.”

 

Resisting Hybridity in Community-Based Third Sector Organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand

Jenny Aimers and Peter Walker. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2666–2684, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-016-
9776-2?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The influence of the state policy agenda though a neo-liberal contracted funding environment is redefining the boundaries of the third sector through a process of hybridisation. Hybridised organisations adapt to possess characteristics and logics of multiple sectors (public, private or community). Increasing hybridity within the New Zealand community and voluntary sector has resulted in a perceived dichotomy separating organisations that adapt to these challenges from those that resist. In this paper, we apply a hybridity lens to seven community development organisations, who have predominantly resisted marketisation and alignment with the state policy agenda, to assess the extent of their hybridity and how this has impacted on their place in the community and voluntary sector and access to funding opportunities available from the state.”

 

A Review of Research on Nonprofit Communications from Mission Statements to Annual Reports

Lawrence Souder. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2787-2806, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-016-9699-y

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This study examined how 43 nonprofit leaders across 15 U.S. states make sense of organizational crises in nonprofit contexts, as well as what they think effective leadership is during crises. Findings revealed perceived nonprofit organizational crises emerging from disasters, disruption of mission delivery, internal stakeholder challenges, and unanticipated occurrences, while six major characteristics of effective crisis leadership emerged including being a team player, being strategic, being transparent with stakeholders, being quick to respond, being self-composed, and being prepared. Comparisons to previous empirical investigations of nonprofit leadership and crisis response yielded additional insights into effective crisis leader sensemaking in nonprofit contexts—most notably that nonprofit crisis leaders leverage sensegiving frameworks of instrumental knowledge, normalcy, and dynamic learning. Further analysis demonstrated these diagnostic and prognostic sensegiving activities to be more clearly observed than motivational sensegiving activities across crisis leaders in nonprofit contexts.”

 

Symbiosis Across Institutional Logics in a Social Enterprise

Cæcilie Maibom and Pernille Smith. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 12, issue 3, pages 260-280, December 2016.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/SEJ-02-2016-0002

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Non-profit organisations are moving from being permeated with social institutional logics to becoming increasingly influenced by market logics. These organisations thereby have to cope with multiple, often conflicting, logics. The existing literature on hybrid organisations has investigated the consequences of multiple logics, focussing in particular on the conflicts and power struggles between the agents of different logics. This paper aims to examine a social enterprise (SE), which in recent years has experienced a shift towards market logics while being firmly grounded in a non-profit social logic. This paper is a qualitative, single-case case study of a SE based on interviews and observations. The paper investigates how this hybrid organisation experienced and responded to an organisational environment marked by multiple institutional logics. Unlike the subjects of many previous studies, the organisation managed to accommodate and assemble the logics in an unproblematic symbiosis. A strong ideological congruence across institutional logics appears to play the main role in spanning the boundaries between institutional logics. Furthermore, organisational structures advocating decentralisation, autonomy and transparency appear to be important facilitators of the integration of diverse logics. This paper contributes to the literature on hybrid organisations and SEs and aids practitioners in such organisations. It suggests that organisational decentralisation, autonomy and transparency facilitate the integration of multiple logics – especially if ideological congruence exists between the actors of different institutional logics. The findings indicate that ideological congruence enhances tolerance towards different approaches and increases the willingness to integrate diverse logics.”

 

Sensegiving, Leadership, and Nonprofit Crises: How Nonprofit Leaders Make and Give Sense to Organizational Crisis

Curt A. Gilstrap, Cristina M. Gilstrap, Kendra Nigel Holderby and Katrina Maria Valera. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2787–2806, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-015-
9648-1?no-access=true

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This study examined how 43 nonprofit leaders across 15 U.S. states make sense of organizational crises in nonprofit contexts, as well as what they think effective leadership is during crises. Findings revealed perceived nonprofit organizational crises emerging from disasters, disruption of mission delivery, internal stakeholder challenges, and unanticipated occurrences, while six major characteristics of effective crisis leadership emerged including being a team player, being strategic, being transparent with stakeholders, being quick to respond, being self-composed, and being prepared. Comparisons to previous empirical investigations of nonprofit leadership and crisis response yielded additional insights into effective crisis leader sensemaking in nonprofit contexts—most notably that nonprofit crisis leaders leverage sensegiving frameworks of instrumental knowledge, normalcy, and dynamic learning. Further analysis demonstrated these diagnostic and prognostic sensegiving activities to be more clearly observed than motivational sensegiving activities across crisis leaders in nonprofit contexts.”

 

Ideology, Practice, and Process? A Review of the Concept of Managerialism in Civil Society Studies

Johan Hvenmark. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 27, issue 6, pages 2833–2859, December 2016.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-015
-9605-z?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Managerialism is today a frequently applied concept in studies of how ideas and practices related to corporate management are diffused in society. Some assert that managerialism even is what most