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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 12, NUMÉRO 8, AOÛT 2017

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Ownership, Control, Agency and Residual Claims in Healthcare: Insights on Cooperatives and Non-Profit Organizations

A Coalition Perspective on Nonprofit Governance Quality: Analyzing Dimensions of Influence in an Exploratory Comparative Case Analysis

Institutional Change and Management of Public–Nonprofit Partnerships

Retaining the Benefits of Government–Nonprofit Contracting Relationship: Opposites Attract or Clash?

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

How Cooperative are savings and Credit Cooperatives in Developing Countries?: an Analysis of Datasets From Uganda

Reaching the Rural Poor through Agricultural Cooperatives in Mongolia

Ageing and the social economy

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Evaluating Social Innovations and their Contribution to Social Value: The Benefits of a 'Blended Value' Approach

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Social Value Creation in Inter-Organizational Collaborations in the Not-for-Profit Sector – Give and Take from a Dyadic Perspective

What Motivates Social Entrepreneurs to Start Social Ventures?

Different Ways of Dealing with Tensions: Practices of (Re) Negotiation in Local Social Economies

Understanding Collaborative Value Creation by Environmental Nonprofit and Renewable Energy Business Partnerships

The Slaughtered and the Survivors: Collaboration between Social Economy Organizations as a Key to Success in Times of Financial Crisis

Nonprofit Collaboration and the Resurrection of Market Failure: How a Resource-Sharing Environment Can Suppress Social Objectives

Tinkering with Space: The Organizational Practices of a Nascent Social Venture

Business Cooperatives: When Does Sharing Become a Drawback?

Partnerships Among Lebanese Nonprofit Organizations: Assessing the Impact on Human Resource Capacity

Alliances between Firms and Non-profits: A Multiple and Behavioural Agency Approach

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

Civil Society and Social Innovation in the Public Sphere: A Pragmatic Perspective

Raiffeisen as Social Innovator

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Government Decentralization and the Size of the Nonprofit Sector: Revisiting the Government Failure Theory

Gouvernement et secteur sans but lucratif des services à la personne en Chine: une relation d’interdépendance dépendante

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

Social Entrepreneurship in Sheltered Employment Centers: A Case Study of Business Success

Autres

Other / Otros

La Borda: a Case Study on the Implementation of Cooperative Housing in Catalonia

Efectos de la crisis económica sobre el emprendimiento en empresas de economía social en España: un análisis espacial

Numéros spéciaux

Special issues

ESS et communs

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos

 

 

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

 

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

 

Ownership, Control, Agency and Residual Claims in Healthcare: Insights on Cooperatives and Non-Profit Organizations

Carolyn Cordery and Bronwyn Howell. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 88, issue 3, pages 403-424, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apce.
12156/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Many issues surrounding healthcare entities’ performance can be traced to their governance and ownership. Increasingly, public services are being provided by non-profit organizations and/or cooperatives, particularly in the healthcare sector. This is not unproblematic. We draw on the conceptual separation of ownership and control, and the notion of firm ownership to derive a taxonomy of dimensions along which a contractual- and property rights theory of the firm can be structured, in order to determine the nature of firms’ differences. We utilize the taxonomy to illustrate important distinctions between non-profit and cooperative firms in the primary healthcare sector and propose testable hypotheses. Funders and regulators must recognise the differences between these firms, if public funding of healthcare is to achieve the expected outcomes.”

 

A Coalition Perspective on Nonprofit Governance Quality: Analyzing Dimensions of Influence in an Exploratory Comparative Case Analysis

Jurgen Willems, Fredrik O. Andersson, Marc Jegers and David O. Renz. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 4, pages 1422-1447, August 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266
-016-9683-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “We answer the call that governance research should focus more on processes outside the boundaries of boards, especially for nonprofit organizations. In particular, we suggest and elaborate concrete steps with respect to the advantages of a leadership coalition perspective to focus more on the behavioral and informal aspects of governance. Through a comparative case analysis of five nonprofit organizations, we explore contingencies between characteristics of nonprofit leadership coalitions and governance quality. We identify two dimensions to classify leadership coalitions: centralized versus diffused influence and specific versus holistic influence. These dimensions are subsequently related with observed governance quality. We frame our finding in the existing literature on group faultlines, which are socially constructed dividing lines within groups, and we discuss the importance of establishing a balanced coalition between a weak or nonexisting and a strong dominant coalition to ensure high governance quality. We also present propositions on how governance quality and its various sub-dimensions can be studied as a complex, nonlinear intermediate concept between coalitional aspects of leadership groups and nonprofit organizational performance. Finally, we discuss concrete avenues for further testing and verification of our theoretical interpretation.”


 

 

Institutional Change and Management of Public–Nonprofit Partnerships

David F. SShow all authorsárez and Nicole Esparza. The American Review of Public Administration, volume, issue 6, pages 648 - 660, August 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0275074015619482

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article focuses attention on the institutional context of cross-sector collaboration and its effects on partnership management. Drawing on fieldwork and 54 interviews from 2011 to 2013, we investigate an innovative public–nonprofit partnership within a local unit of the National Park Service. The collaboration demonstrates the power and potential of public–nonprofit partnerships while revealing tensions that cross-sector activities can provoke in an organizational field. We focus on two ongoing processes of institutional change in the nonprofit sector that shape these dynamics: (a) managerialism and (b) empowered agency. We illustrate these processes and suggest that they alter the context for partnerships in national parks, particularly with respect to capacity and control. We conclude by offering several propositions about institutional change and the broader implications of a shifting context for public–nonprofit partnerships.”

 

Retaining the Benefits of Government–Nonprofit Contracting Relationship: Opposites Attract or Clash?

Wenjue Lu Knutsen. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 4, pages 1373–1398, August 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-017
-9874-9?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The benefits and negative consequences of government–nonprofit contracting are well documented. From the literature, we know that government and nonprofits can demonstrate contradictory organization-level characteristics. Some argue that these contradictions make government and nonprofits complementary partners, but empirical evidence reveals the potential loss of nonprofit voluntariness. How does one harvest the alleged benefits of the government–nonprofit relationship while minimizing the potential loss of nonprofit voluntariness? Through the qualitative investigation of one nonprofit, this study identifies seven types of organizational-level differences between the government and the nonprofit. These conflicts are manifested by three forms of power struggle. This illuminates that power struggles are the root cause of the potential loss of nonprofits’ voluntariness. The author argues that as long as nonprofits depend on the government for resources, power struggles will persist and voluntariness will be at risk; hence, addressing resource dependence is the key to answering our research question.”

 

 

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

 

How Cooperative are savings and Credit Cooperatives in Developing Countries?: an Analysis of Datasets From Uganda

Oliver Schmidt. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 88, issue 3, pages 345-368, September 2017.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apce.
12155/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Building successful savings and credit cooperatives (SACCOs) that actually embody the cooperative principles is a challenge to development agencies. Although SACCOs form the majority of microfinance providers in many developing countries, the most recent literature on microfinance governance and performance has given little reference to the longstanding body of relevant cooperative literature. SACCO representation in microfinance datasets is biased. Drawing on so-far unexploited datasets of Ugandan SACCOs and savings groups, this paper empirically analyses policy debate regarding SACCO- and savings group regulation. The findings point to the relevance of practically implementing the principle of ‘cooperation between cooperatives’ to ensure effective governance at SACCO level. Moreover, the paper introduces two new measures, based on members' savings and shares, which could become useful tools to track the application of cooperative principles in developing countries, and hence improve evidence-based policy-making for SACCOs.”

 


 

 

Reaching the Rural Poor through Agricultural Cooperatives in Mongolia

Marketa Hilliova, Jiri Hejkrlik, Jana Mazancova and Tserendavaa Tseren. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 88, Issue 3, pages 449-466, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apce.12162/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper focuses on the cooperative sector in central Mongolia. Its aim is to provide new insights into the role and importance of cooperatives among poor rural populations. We analyse cooperatives’ inclusiveness of smaller herders and farmers and cooperatives’ governance structures. The research is based on data collected in selected provinces of the central Töv region. The data were collected for three distinctive target groups – cooperative board members, cooperative members and non-members. We found that the cooperative sector in Mongolia is strongly affected by the governmental policy regarding wool subsidies, which provides subsidies only to cooperative members and has consequently caused rapid growth in the number of new, free-riding cooperative members and led to very low levels of members’ self-identification with their cooperatives. This policy also affects the inner organizational structures of cooperatives. Further, we found indications that poorer farmers tend not to be members of cooperatives and that the overall benefits for non-members and the general community arising from local cooperatives are rather low.”
 

Ageing and the social economy

Brendan Murtagh. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 13, issue 3, pages 216-233, August 2017.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/SEJ-02-2017-0009

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The purpose of this paper is to concern with the extent to which social economies can be constructed as alternatives to private and state markets and their purported neoliberal tendencies. The paper presents a meta-evaluation of an integrated set of projects supported by philanthropic investment to build finance, skills, entrepreneurship, social enterprises and non-monetised trading in the age sector in Northern Ireland. The programme had important successes in stimulating social entrepreneurship, improving employability and showing how social enterprises can be incubated and scaled to offer new services for older people. It also improved skills in contract readiness, but this did not translate into new borrowing or trading models, even among larger NGOs. In that all economies are, to some extent, constructed and socially mediated, there is value in thinking through the components, relationships and projects that might make the ecosystem work more effectively. This should not just offer a counterweight to the market but could explore how an alternative arena for producing and consuming goods and services can be formed, especially among potentially vulnerable age communities. The albeit, small-scale investment in a range of interrelated projects shows not only the value in experimentation but also the limits in planned attempts to construct social markets. The analysis shows that social economies need to respond to the priorities of older people, grown from community initiatives and better connected to the capabilities and resources of the sector.”

 

 

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

 

Evaluating Social Innovations and their Contribution to Social Value: The Benefits of a 'Blended Value' Approach

Chris Dayson. Policy and politics, volume 45, issue 3, pages 395-411, July 2017.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/pap
/2017/00000045/00000003/art00006

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Social innovation is viewed as a solution to developing new services that address complex needs and create 'social value', but what constitutes social value and how to measure it is contested. Drawing on a case study of a social prescribing pilot, this paper provides an example of how social value can be evaluated to support decisions by commissioners of socially innovative interventions. It argues that social value presents an epistemological and methodological challenge for commissioners seeking to embed it in decision making and recommends evaluating social innovations though a 'blended value' lens.”

 

 


 

 

Gestion

Management / Gestión

 

Social Value Creation in Inter-Organizational Collaborations in the Not-for-Profit Sector – Give and Take from a Dyadic Perspective

Christiana Weber, Kathrin Weidner, Arne Kroeger and James Wallace. Jounal of Management Studies, volume 54, issue 6, pages 929–956, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joms
.12272/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Organizations in the not-for-profit (NFP) sector are increasingly collaborating with other organizations to mutually raise overall joint value created. However, literature on inter-organizational collaborations in the NFP sector lacks a clear, empirically proven understanding about which factors drive such joint value creation and whether and how these factors and their effects differ for the two parties involved. Based on the relational view and an analysis of 121 partnership dyads, we identify that some factors governing the successful creation of joint value differ for the two partners while others are relevant to both parties. Those latter factors, in turn, differ in their effects on the respective outcome.”

 

What Motivates Social Entrepreneurs to Start Social Ventures?

Seham Ghalwash, Ahmed Tolba and Ayman Ismail. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 13, issue: 3, pages 268-298, August 2017.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs
/10.1108/SEJ-05-2016-0014

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This study aims to explore the characteristics and backgrounds of social entrepreneurs, particularly in relation to what motivates them to start new social ventures, through an empirical examination of the phenomenon of social entrepreneurship in the specific context of Egypt. The study adopts a qualitative methodological approach based on a triangulation of data sources, including extensive interviews from five social entrepreneurs, interviews with senior executives in their organisations and industry experts, as well as secondary data. The paper proposes a model that integrates common characteristics and motivations among individuals who start social ventures. Findings confirm the characteristics of social entrepreneurs as compassionate risk-takers with entrepreneurial mindsets who seek to address social issues in innovative ways. They also have the perseverance to face the inefficient institutional frameworks prevalent in developing economies. Social entrepreneurs are motivated by social problems and challenges, inspiration, and previous personal experiences, as well as their social networks. There are limitations pertaining to the limited sample size and single country focus. This research offers useful and practical insights for current and future social entrepreneurs, particularly in developing economies. Moreover, the study contributes to expanding future research on social entrepreneurship in similar contexts. This study makes several contributions to the literature on social entrepreneurship. First, by presenting an integrated model for the characteristics/traits and motivations of social entrepreneur. Second, it provides deeper understanding of social entrepreneurship in emerging economies. Third, it highlights the importance of personal inspiration and informal social networks as two sources of motivation for social entrepreneurs, in emerging countries.”

 

Different Ways of Dealing with Tensions: Practices of (Re) Negotiation in Local Social Economies

Micaela Mazzei. Social Enterprise Journal, volume 13, issue 3, pages 299-314, August 2017.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full
/10.1108/SEJ-07-2016-0026

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The purpose of this paper is to propose a nuanced understanding of the diverse practices social enterprises engage in to fulfil their commitments of delivering social/environmental goods and/or services while earning income to sustain their activities. This research paper is based on an empirical investigation which used an ethnographic approach to study the social economy in two distinct city regions in the north of England. Against a common-sense view of social enterprises being able to balance (with ease) social and economic goals, this paper suggests, based on empirical insights, that such a harmonious rendition tends to neglect the messiness at the heart of such organisations. Heeding ongoing reflections, explanations and negotiations as key ingredients in keeping social enterprises “balanced”, this paper argues that negotiating tensions is a constantly dynamic process. Using an ethnographic approach, this paper offers insights into the complexities and tensions social enterprises constantly deal with and it shows these tensions must be constantly renegotiated.”

Understanding Collaborative Value Creation by Environmental Nonprofit and Renewable Energy Business Partnerships

Alex Lyakhov and Travis Gliedt. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 4, pages 1448–1472, August 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-
016-9691-6?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Many environmental nonprofit organizations (ENPOs) seek to create sustainability value by promoting environmental principles and influencing policymakers to support pro-environmental legislation. One strategy used by ENPOs to enhance the value creation process is the development of partnerships with businesses. Semi-structured interviews with leaders of six national ENPOs in the United States were conducted to examine the sources and types of value created by collaborations with renewable energy businesses, and the partnership processes and outcomes that are most desirable. The goal was to understand how and why ENPOs seek partnerships, what the potential benefits are, and whether or not ENPO leadership orientation, as characterized by their perceptions of the political opportunity structure, political ideology, and environmental philosophy, led to different views of partnerships for sustainability value creation. The finding that differences in the partnership perspectives of the ENPO leadership did not directly link to differences in the leadership orientations suggests that none of the orientations precluded partnering in general and may even have been enablers in some cases.”

 

The Slaughtered and the Survivors: Collaboration between Social Economy Organizations as a Key to Success in Times of Financial Crisis

Francisco José López-Arceiz, Ana José Bellostas and María Pilar Rivera-Torres. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 4, pages 1622–1647, August 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11266-
017-9836-2?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The objective of this study is to analyze the aspects that allowed a critical part of Social Economy Organizations (SEOs) to survive a recession period, especially participation in collaborative networks. The financial stress of an SEO will depend on the resources and capabilities available to the organization. To analyze the financial stress of Spanish SEOs, we defined a sample of 714 SEOs. Approximately half of these organizations suffered from financial stress in the analyzed period (2009–2012). The results obtained in this study reveal the existence of three factors that distinguish organizations under financial stress: (a) a high dependence on government funding; (b) changes in the relationship between staff and volunteers; and (c) a lack of access to markets. The combination of these three elements results in an unsustainable situation for the organization. The development of a collaborative profile increases the SEO’s probability of surviving the adverse manifestations of its environment.”

 

Nonprofit Collaboration and the Resurrection of Market Failure: How a Resource-Sharing Environment Can Suppress Social Objectives

Eva Witesman and Andrew Heiss.VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 28, issue 4, pages 1500-1528, August 2017.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s
11266-016-9684-5?no-access=true

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Collaboration and its promotion by funders continue to accelerate. Although research has identified significant transaction costs associated with collaboration, little empirical work has examined the broader, societal-level economic outcomes of a resource-sharing environment. Does an environment that encourages collaboration shift our focus toward certain types of social objectives and away from others? This paper uses agent-based Monte Carlo simulation to demonstrate that collaboration is particularly useful when resources are rare but a social objective is commonly held. However, collaboration can lead to bad outcomes when the objective is not commonly shared; in such cases, markets outperform collaborative arrangements. These findings suggest that encouraging a resource-sharing environment can lead to inefficiencies even worse than market failure. We also demonstrate that failure to account for transaction costs when prescribing collaboration can result in quantifiably lower outcome levels than expected.”

 


 

 

Tinkering with Space: The Organizational Practices of a Nascent Social Venture

Ester Barinaga. Organization Studies, volume 38, issue 7, pages 937-958, July 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.
1177/0170840616670434

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above:The article seeks to further our understanding of the process of organizing nascent social ventures. It builds upon current research on the political and collaborative nature of the social entrepreneurial process, and takes an ANT-inspired processual approach to follow the organizational practices carried by a nascent social venture in its efforts to mobilize stakeholders, bring about collaboration and ultimately secure resources. It draws upon empirical material generated during the first year of a social venture I founded and continue to chair. Findings highlight the adaptive and fluid nature of the organizational practices involved in nascent organizations and indicate that the capacity to continuously adjust the qualities of the eventual venture to the stakes of potential partners is instrumental to start up the venture. The article suggests the notion of tinkering to underscore the fluidity, the ongoing and piecemeal everyday work of such organizing processes. Further, findings highlight the extent to which social ventures, as well as the engaged scholar, are caught in the networks that contribute to reproduce the social problem they aim to change.”

 

Business Cooperatives: When Does Sharing Become a Drawback?

Benoît Roux and Loïc Plé. Journal of Business Strategy, volume 38, issue 4, pages 11-20, July 2017.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs
/10.1108/JBS-04-2016-0037

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Cooperatives are relatively understudied compared with investor-owned companies, yet their economic impact makes them important to consider. This study is to focus on business cooperatives that gather firms or entrepreneurs that share the same social and economic motivations and need to ally to grow. The positive and negative consequences of membership on the members’ business models are detailed. Insights to address and prevent the detrimental influences of membership on members’ business model are provided. This conceptual study relies on several business cases to suggest that cooperative membership comes with positive and detrimental consequences for the three dimensions of members’ business models: their organization, resources and competences and value propositions (i.e. members’ offers). Because organization, resources and competences, and value propositions are affected by membership in a cooperative, business members’ control over their own business models may diminish. This can offer positive consequences but may also be too constraining and harmful in the long term. Only scant research has investigated the influence of cooperatives on members’ business models. Further studies could help firms and entrepreneurs maximize the advantages of their membership in cooperatives while limiting the detrimental consequences over time. If they are aware of the potential drawbacks of business cooperative membership, members can implement proactive efforts to avoid losing control of their business models. Prior literature mainly concentrates on how cooperatives work and develop. No prior study seems to have investigated the consequences of cooperatives’ membership on members’ business models.”

 

Partnerships Among Lebanese Nonprofit Organizations: Assessing the Impact on Human Resource Capacity

Khaldoun AbouAssi and Suyeon Jo. The American Review of Public Administration, volume, issue 6, pages 687-698, August 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0275074015613850

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article investigates the impacts of partnerships on three aspects of nonprofits’ human resources capacity—paid staff, volunteers, and the professional development of staff of nonprofit organizations. Analysis of the seemingly unrelated regressions (SUR) suggests that partnerships may yield some human capacity improvements, that is, increasing the number of staff and opportunities for their professional development. The number of volunteers is not affected by partnerships but rather by other financial resources. The main implication of this research is that partnerships should be formed on the basis of their comparative advantages and focused on identifying suitable partners and cultivating these relations rather than collaborating with more organizations.”

 


 

 

Alliances between Firms and Non-profits: A Multiple and Behavioural Agency Approach

Miguel Rivera-Santos, Carlos Rufín and U. Wassmer. Journal of Management Studies, volume 54, issue 6, pages 854–875, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joms.
12271/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: We analyse business-NGO (B2N) alliances through the lenses of multiple agency and behavioural agency theories to identify the sources of agency problems and the most effective choice of mitigation mechanisms. We contend that three types of agency relationships constitute B2N alliances: the relationship between the firm's managers and B2N alliance employees; the relationship between the NGO's managers and the B2N alliance employees; and the novel ‘claimed principal-agent relationship’ involving the external beneficiary, the NGO's managers and the alliance employees. We argue that B2N alliances’ three types of agency problems stem from (1) the relative emphasis on public vs. private goods, both at the employee and at the partner levels, and (2) the level of the external beneficiary's voice. We then predict the mechanisms to mitigate these problems: hiring altruistic over self-interested individuals; narrowly specifying the employees’ activities; emphasizing input-based and intrinsic incentive mechanisms; and investing significantly into non-intrusive monitoring mechanisms.”

 

 

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

 

Civil Society and Social Innovation in the Public Sphere: A Pragmatic Perspective

Luciana Ronconi, Rubens Lima Moraes, Aghata Karoliny Ribeiro Gonsalves and Lilian Brum Duarte Serafim. Revista de Administracao Publica, volume 51, issue 3, pages 369-387, May-June 2017.

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&
pid=S0034-76122017000300369&lng=en&tlng=en

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This article proposes a new theoretical approach for the study of social innovation processes promoted by civil society actors in the public sphere, based on French pragmatic sociology. It begins with a discussion about the current place of civil society initiatives in public action. Debate about civil society involvement in the public sphere is then explored, showing to what extent the French pragmatic sociology can provide a new understanding of this process. Finally, an analytical perspective is proposed, which relates the discussions about collective action of civil society, social innovation and public action, presenting some assumptions that can help to better comprehend processes of co-definition and co-dominium of problematic situations in public arenas.”

 

Raiffeisen as Social Innovator

Brett Fairbairn. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 88, issue 3, pages 425-448, September 2017.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/
apce.12157/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “In recent years the term social innovation has become widely used by policy makers, yet important ambiguities remain. One of these concerns what has been called the paradox of embedded agency – how social innovators conceive of something new when working with existing social institutions. So far few writers have considered whether historical examples can, with benefit of hindsight, shed light on the relationships between social innovators and social institutions. This paper considers the example of Friedrich Wilhelm Raiffeisen, creator of rural credit unions and agricultural co-operatives in 19th-century Germany. Raiffeisen was a social conservative who worked in many ways within existing social institutions. At the same time, his desire to meet social needs drove him to create new forms of action and organization that resulted in social innovation. Raiffeisen's process of invention shows that social innovation, particularly in transitional eras like his, need not be a matter of using logical-deductive processes to address a social need, but may depend critically on values, will, a readiness to experiment, and an ability to find allies. These qualities enabled Raiffeisen to break through existing institutions to do something fundamentally new, and they may be qualities that provide new focus for social-innovation research and policy.”

 

 


 

 

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

 

Government Decentralization and the Size of the Nonprofit Sector: Revisiting the Government Failure Theory

Gao Liu. The American Review of Public Administration, volume, issue 6, pages 619 – 633, August 2017.

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/
10.1177/0275074016631643

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article revisits government failure theory by examining the relationship between government decentralization and the size of the nonprofit sector (NPS). Government failure theory posits that nonprofits are most active in regions where the largest gap exists between the homogeneous supply of public service and heterogeneous citizen demands. Following this theory, government decentralization should decrease the size of the NPS, as it increases the efficiency and heterogeneity of government services. This article tests this hypothesis using a sample of U.S. counties. Decentralization is measured in two dimensions: vertical decentralization and horizontal fragmentation. After using instrumental regressions to eliminate the endogeneity bias, we find that counties with a more horizontally fragmented governmental system are associated with a larger NPS. Vertical centralization leads to a denser NPS but has no impact on the NPS revenue or assets. The impacts of resident heterogeneity are also mixed. As such, government failure theory is only partially supported, at best. Contrarily, interdependence theory is supported by this study.”

 

Gouvernement et secteur sans but lucratif des services à la personne en Chine: une relation d’interdépendance dépendante

Zhang Yuanfeng, Mou Jie, Chen Qiqi. Revue Internationale de l’Économie Sociale (RECMA), issue 345, Juillet 2017.

http://www.recma.org/article/gouvernement-et-
secteur-sans-lucratif-des-services-la-personne
-en-chine-une-relation

Résumé issu de l’URL ci-haut : « Cet article examine la relation entre le gouvernement et le secteur à but non lucratif des services à la personne en Chine, que les auteurs qualifient d’ « interdépendance  dépendante », alors que la relation entre le gouvernement et les associations est généralement analysée dans le cadre théorique de la société civile et du corporatisme. Après une courte présentation historique de ces relations, l’article documente les différents types d’institutions qui composent le secteur, particulièrement celles, nombreuses, qui gèrent les services à la personne. Les auteurs s’intéressent notamment aux relations entre le gouvernement et le secteur à but non lucratif de l’assistance sociale, qui est la principale sous-catégorie des services à la personne en Chine. Après une présentation des outils adoptés par le gouvernement pour soutenir le secteur à but non lucratif, l’article conclut sur les principales caractéristiques de cette relation d’interdépendance dépendante. »

 

 

CONCEPTS ET DÉFINITIONS

Concepts and definitions / Conceptos y definiciones

 

Social Entrepreneurship in Sheltered Employment Centers: A Case Study of Business Success

Vera Gelashvili, Eva Aguilar, María-Jesús Segovia-Vargas, Maria-Del-Mar Camacho-Miñano and María Teresa Blanco Hernández. Entrepreneurship: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications, Volume 4, issue 4, pages 1953-1974, March 2017.

https://www.igi-global.com/chapter/social-entrepren
eurship-in-sheltered-employment-centers/179741

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Sheltered Employment Centers (CEE) are part of the social economy companies, based on the primacy of people over capital, social benefits and solidarity. Its aim is to carry out productive work and they are a means of integration of the greatest possible number of disabled people. There is a growing interest in this type of business, because its number has increased considerably. The objective of this chapter is to give academic visibility to CEE due to its great contribution to the social corporate responsibility, and to encourage the so-called social entrepreneurship. The reasons for creating social firms are analyzed and the characteristics that can contribute to the success of this type of companies are studied. Using the case study methodology, a CEE is analyzed in depth showing the main features of social economy business by means of a specific case and the key variables that has conducted to its success.”