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ECO-SOC INFO, VOLUME 10, NUMÉRO 8, AOÛT 2015

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TABLE DES MATIÈRES

ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes

Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general

Nonprofit–Public Collaborations: Understanding Governance Dynamics

Value Creation in Cross-Sector Collaborations: The Roles of Experience and Alignment

Hybridisation in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of 'responsibilised autonomy'

MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento

Customer-Owned Banking in Australia: From Credit union to Mutual Bank

Social enterprises as enabling workplaces for people with psychiatric disabilities

Économie territoriale et économie immatérielle : quels enjeux pour l'ESS ?

Investment Decisions of Nonprofit Firms: Evidence from Hospitals

Finances solidaires informelles au Pérou dans la perspective du capital social

Credit Unions: Market Niche or Market Accommodation?

ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación

Toward a New Metrics for the Evaluation of the Social Added Value of Social Enterprises

Comparative Efficiency between Cooperative, Savings and Commercial Banks in Europe Using the Frontier Approach

Gestion

Management / Gestión

Marco téorico y metodológico para la validación cualitativa de un modelo explicativo de la responsabilidad social en sociedades cooperativas

Characterization and Analysis of Cooperative Mergers and Their Results

Welfare Enhancing Coordination in Consumer Cooperatives Under Mixed Oligopoly

Social disclosure based on the GRI guidelines for the social economy: a tool for improving member-cooperative relations

Work Engagement in the Third Sector

Sector Choice: How Fair Trade Entrepreneurs Choose Between Nonprofit and For-Profit Forms

Developing and Validating a Measure of Stakeholder Culture for the Not-for-Profit Sector

Nonprofit Collaboration with Luxury Brands: Positive and Negative Effects for Cause-Related Marketing

Turnover and Retention in Nonprofit Employment: The Korean College Graduates’ Experience

Organizational Challenges of Community Associations: Applying Nonprofit Research to Real-World Problems

La transmission au cœur de l’économie politique des coopératives

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

New Frontiers in Social Innovation Research (book)

Scaling Out, Scaling Up, Scaling Deep: Strategies of Non-profits in Advancing Systemic Social Innovation

POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas

Social Enterprise, Policy Entrepreneurs, and the Third Sector: The Case of South Korea

AUTRES

Other / Otros

Analysis of Audit Fees for Nonprofits: Resource Dependence and Agency Theory Approaches

Sensemaking in collaborative management research: Insights from an Italian social cooperative

NUMÉROS SPÉCIAUX

Special Issues / Ediciones especiales

L'ESS en Amérique latine: de nouvelles pratiques

Social and economic impact of the Social Economy

VARIA

Dynamiques de transformation des modèles économiques des structures de l'ESS dans les services à domicile

ACTES DE COLLOQUES

CONFERENCE PAPERS / PUBLICACIONES DE EVENTOS CIENTIFICOS

Social Economy in a Globalized Word

APPELS À CONTRIBUTIONS

Calls for contributions / Convocatorias de artículos

ÉVÉNEMENTS À VENIR

Events / Eventos



ARTICLES ET MONOGRAPHIES

Periodic articles and publications / Artículos y publicaciónes


Gouvernance et intÉrÊt GÉnÉral

Governance and general interest / Gobernanza y interés general


Nonprofit–Public Collaborations: Understanding Governance Dynamics

Chris Cornforth, John Paul Hayes and Siv Vangen. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 4 pages 775–795, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/775?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “As many of the challenges facing society are too complex to be addressed by single organizations working alone, nonprofit organizations are increasingly working in collaboration with public authorities. The governance of nonprofit–public collaborations is important for their effectiveness, yet it remains poorly understood. Drawing on case study research, this article examines and develops an extant conceptual model developed by Takahashi and Smutny that seeks to explain the formation and demise of nonprofit collaborations in terms of “collaborative windows” and the inability to adapt initial governance structures. The research finds that while initial governance structures are an important constraint on development, they can be adapted and changed. It also suggests that the development of collaborations is not only influenced by changes in the collaborative window but also by how key actors in the collaboration respond to important internal tensions.”


Value Creation in Cross-Sector Collaborations: The Roles of Experience and Alignment

Matthew Murphy, Daniel Arenas and Joan Manuel Batista. Journal of Business Ethics, volume 130, issue 1, pages 145-162, August 2015.

 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551

-014-2204-x?wt_mc=alerts.TOCjournals

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This research uses a survey (N = 362) to analyze types of benefits sought by partners in cross-sector collaborations (between businesses and NPOs) in Spain and to test and build upon theories that indicate prior collaboration experience and partner alignment will positively affect value creation through the collaboration. Using exploratory factor analysis to operationalize a broad range of potential benefits into more specific concepts, the results of this study identify distinct factors that characterize the types of benefits sought by non-profit organizations and businesses engaged in cross-sector collaborations. Findings show that prior experience and alignment positively affect each factor for value creation. Prior experience is also found to influence the type of benefits sought from cross-sector collaborations and to positively affect alignment in terms of mission and strategy. Unexpectedly, the study also finds that prior experience moderates the effect of alignment on value creation.”


Hybridisation in a corporatist third sector regime: paradoxes of 'responsibilised autonomy'

Hustinx Lesley, De Waele Els and Delcour Chloë. Voluntary Sector Review, volume 6, issue 2, pages 115-134, June 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/vsr/

2015/00000006/00000002/art00001

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This study explores the generally prevailing diagnosis of 'hybridisation' in the third sector under a new mode of governing welfare, with a focus on processes of devolution of public responsibility and 'responsibilised autonomy' for third sector organisations (TSOs) and volunteers. To this end, we conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with representatives from field-specific umbrella organisations and with officials working in independent governmental agencies. Our analysis generally deals with three themes: devolution of responsibility, accountability, and volunteers as responsibilised service providers. Our findings reveal four paradoxes or unintended consequences of 'responsibilised autonomy': decreased autonomy for TSOs, an administrative deadlock that crowds out grassroots associations and volunteers, an increasing demand for professional support for volunteering, and a bifurcation between strong and weak volunteers, whereby the latter are 're-excluded' through volunteering.”


MODES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT ET DE FINANCEMENT

Modes of development and financing / Modos de desarollo y de financiamiento


Customer-Owned Banking in Australia: From Credit union to Mutual Bank

Ameeta Jain, Monica Keneley and Dianne Thomson. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 3, pages 401-420, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/

apce.12062/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Since the 1990s financial sector regulation in Australia has treated credit unions and building societies the same as banks under the designated title of authorized depository institutions. This allows credit unions to choose between different organizational structures: cooperative; convert to customer-owned banks or to demutualize. This article utilizes semi-structured interviews to analyse the key motivations for organizational change. It examines a number of credit unions and their conversion experience to customer-owned banks. It finds that adaptation of the credit union model was necessary to change customer perceptions, ensure future growth in the customer base and assets, and facilitate access to capital raisings with the credit rating of a bank. Despite this change customer-owned banks retain the core principals of mutuality


Social enterprises as enabling workplaces for people with psychiatric disabilities

Pearl Buhariwala, Robert Wilton and Joshua Evans. Disability & Society, volume 30, issue 6, pages 865-879, July 2015.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/096875

99.2015.1057318#.VbEgzU1RGpo

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: In recent years, western governments influenced by neoliberalism have emphasized paid work as a key route to social inclusion and community participation for people with psychiatric disabilities. Although paid work can offer many rewards, access to mainstream employment for people with psychiatric disabilities is difficult as they continue to encounter discrimination and a lack of workplace accommodation. One response to these challenges has been the creation of social enterprises as ‘alternative spaces’ of employment for people with psychiatric disabilities. On the basis of interviews with key informants from 21 different social enterprises across Ontario, Canada, this paper critically analyzes the strategies used by organizations to create jobs that are both accommodating for people, but also conducive to the ongoing success of the business.

 

Économie territoriale et économie immatérielle : quels enjeux pour l'ESS ?

Jean-François Draperi. Revue Internationale de l’Économie Sociale (RECMA), numéro 337, août 2015.

http://www.recma.org/edito/economie-territoriale-et-ec

onomie-immaterielle-quels-enjeux-pour-less

Résumé issue de  l’URL ci-haut: «Nous savons désormais que l’économie sociale et solidaire (ESS) est capable, en complémentarité avec les collectivités territoriales et en partenariat avec l’économie de proximité des TPE et PME, de participer à une politique économique des territoires alternative à l’économie dominée par les grandes sociétés de capitaux.»


Investment Decisions of Nonprofit Firms: Evidence from Hospitals

Adeliono Manuel, Lewellen Katharina, Sundaram Anant. The Journal of Finance, volume 70, issue 4, pages 1583-1628, August 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/jofi

/2015/00000070/00000004/art00007

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “This paper examines investment choices of nonprofit hospitals. It tests how shocks to cash flows caused by the performance of the hospitals’ financial assets affect hospital expenditures. Capital expenditures increase, on average, by 10 to 28 cents for every dollar received from financial assets. The sensitivity is similar to that found earlier for shareholder‐owned corporations. Executive compensation, other salaries, and perks do not respond significantly to cash flow shocks. Hospitals with an apparent tendency to overspend on medical procedures do not exhibit higher investment‐cash flow sensitivities. The sensitivities are higher for hospitals that appear financially constrained.


Finances solidaires informelles au Pérou dans la perspective du capital social

Sonia Tello-Rozas. Revue Internationale de l’Économie Sociale (RECMA), numéro 337, août 2015.

http://www.recma.org/article/finances-solidaires-infor

melles-au-perou-dans-la-perspective-du-capital-social

Résumé issue de l’URL ci-haut : « Cette recherche explore les raisons qui motivent la participation aux finances solidaires informelles dans le contexte de l’Amérique latine, celui du Pérou notamment, à travers la notion de capital social. Dans ce but, nous examinons le cas des associations d’épargne et de crédit rotatif (AECR), une forme de crédit tontinier fondée sur la confiance et l’information partagée. Malgré le développement et la consolidation des microfinances dans ce pays, on observe que les associations de type tontinier sont encore très utilisées. A partir d’une étude exploratoire qualitative, nos résultats suggèrent que le type de capital social mobilisé explique en partie les motifs de leur utilisation. Par ailleurs, notre analyse met en exergue les motivations sociales, moins souvent explorées dans la littérature. »


Credit Unions: Market Niche or Market Accommodation?

Laurie Mook, John Maiorano and Jack Quarter. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 4, pages 814–831, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/814?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Credit unions, nonprofit mutual associations also called financial cooperatives, have a lengthy history. The World Council of Credit Unions reports that credit unions are found in 101 countries representing 56,000 credit unions, more than 200 million members, and $1.7 trillion in assets. This study, following earlier research in Canada that found that credit unions are more prevalent in rural communities and small towns relative to the general population and to banks, examines credit union and bank branches in three U.S. states (Arizona, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin). We find that credit union branches are strongly represented in sizable urban communities, and are more likely to be located in low-income zip code areas than banks. The data show not only evidence of a credit union niche market but also a tension between social and economic objectives, and that credit unions accommodate themselves to profit norms, what we refer to as market accommodation.”


ÉVALUATION

Evaluation methods / Métodos de evaluación


Toward a New Metrics for the Evaluation of the Social Added Value of Social Enterprises

Andrea Bassi and Giorgia Vincenti. CIRIEC-España, Revista de Economia Pública, Social y Cooperativa, nº 83, pp. 9-42, 2015

http://www.ciriec-revistaeconomia.es/banco/

CIRIEC_8301_Bassi_and_Vincenti.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “There is a widespread dissatisfaction among nonprofit leaders and managers, private funders and public decision-makers concerning the current systems of social impact assessment of nonprofit organizations/social enterprises (NPO/SE). The systems of performance measurement of NPO/SE vary greatly in relationship to a series of endogenous and exogenous variables related to different organizational environments: economic, political, social and cultural. The aim of this article is to present an innovative theoretical framework on the basis of which it is possible to define a set of indicators for the evaluation of the social added value produced by NPO/SE. Our hypothesis is that NPO/SE are characterized by their ability to generate different outcome at each of the dimensions of social life: micro, meso and macro. Meaning, a sense of responsibility at the micro level; relational goods at the meso level; and social capital at the macro level. The article illustrates the assessment tool called S.A.V.E. applied, as empirical reference, to three Italian social enterprises operating in the field of health and social services (local welfare systems).”


Comparative Efficiency between Cooperative, Savings and Commercial Banks in Europe Using the Frontier Approach

Mikko Mäkinen and Derek C. Jones. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 3, pages 401-420, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ap

ce.12060/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “We test competing hypotheses concerning the comparative behavior of shareholder-owned commercial banks and stakeholder-orientated cooperative and savings banks in European banking. One hypothesis is that the risk culture and business models of stakeholder and shareholder-owned banks have become more alike and so cost efficiency has converged between bank ownership structures. The alternative hypothesis suggests that institutional differences do matter and lead, amongst other things, to variation in network effects and monitoring mechanisms producing differing behaviors and efficiency outcomes. By using a novel panel data set of 521 European banks during 1994–2010, we find: (i) mean inefficiency scores vary by ownership type and are lower for cooperative banks than for commercial and savings banks; (ii) there is a large variation in inefficiency scores among banks within each ownership type but the lower variance for cooperative banks indicates that they are the most homogeneous group; (iii) the inefficiency distribution of savings and commercial banks appear to arise from the same distribution, but this does not hold for cooperative banks. As such our findings are more consistent with the alternative hypothesis. Our first two findings buttress those studies that found significant differences between European banks with differing ownership structures, while our third finding on the significance of the cycle to the distribution of inefficiency is novel.”


Gestion

Management / Gestión


Marco téorico y metodológico para la validación cualitativa de un modelo explicativo de la responsabilidad social en sociedades cooperativas

Dolores Gallardo-Vázquez Mª Isabel Sánchez-Hernández y Francisca Castilla-Polo. REVESCO, Revista de Estudios Cooperativos, nº 118, pp. 12-33, Segundo Cuatrimestre 2015.

http://pendientedemigracion.ucm.es/info/revesco/txt/REVESCO%

20N%20118.4%20Dolores%20GALLARDO%20et%20al.pdf

Resumen proveniente del artículo: “En este trabajo se presenta un marco teórico y una propuesta metodológica para la validación cualitativa de un modelo explicativo de la Responsabilidad Social en las Sociedades Cooperativas. La variable central de análisis, la llamada Orientación a la Responsabilidad Social en Cooperativas (ORSCOOP), no es directamente observable, siendo necesario medirla a través de un conjunto de indicadores. Igualmente ocurre con el resto de variables estratégicas con las que la ORSCOOP está relacionada en el modelo que proponemos (satisfacción de los socios, innovación, calidad del servicio y resultado cooperativo o desempeño). Para la validación de los indicadores se recurre a una metodología cualitativa en base a la valoración y acuerdo de un grupo de profesionales expertos quienes, por aplicación de la técnica Delphi, colaborarán para lograr una definición única y consensuada. A partir de sus opiniones y recomendaciones se llevarán a cabo las modificaciones oportunas con el fin de unificar los criterios procedentes de los distintos expertos. Como resultado se obtendrá una escala consensuada para cada variable del modelo propuesto. Esta unanimidad de opiniones en el resultado final será la base para un posterior tratamiento cuantitativo del modelo conceptual propuesto.”


Characterization and Analysis of Cooperative Mergers and Their Results

Elena Melia-Marti and Ana Maria Martinez-Garcia. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 3, pages 479–504, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/

apce.12083/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This study characterizes the mergers and acquisitions undertaken in the Spanish agrifood sector during the period 1995–2005. First, it aims to establish the pre-merger financial characteristics of the merging cooperatives in comparison with other firms in the agrifood sector. For this, the financial situation is analyzed in the different types of merger carried out (merger by formation or merger by acquisition), and the different roles played by the cooperatives (acquiring, acquired or involved in a merger in which a new cooperative is formed). The second and final objective is to determine whether these mergers have managed to improve the economic-financial situation of the companies involved, either by increasing income and size or by reducing relative costs. For this purpose, several non parametric tests and a probit model were used. The results show that on average following a merger there were no statistically significant improvements in the economic-financial indicators studied.”


Welfare Enhancing Coordination in Consumer Cooperatives Under Mixed Oligopoly

Marco A. Marini, Paolo Polidori, Désirée Teobaldelli and Alberto Zevi. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, volume 86, issue 3, pages 505-527, September 2015.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apc

e.12059/abstract?campaign=woletoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: The recent globalization of world economies has led the retail markets of developed countries towards increasing levels of integration and strategic interdependence. A non negligible share of retail and food markets is currently served by co-operative societies. Consistently with this trend, the consumer cooperatives have recently experienced increasing levels of integration. The main aim of this paper is to study the welfare effects of coordination among consumer cooperatives competing in quantities in a mixed oligopoly against profit-maximizing firms. We show that, in absence of agency problems, under increasing or constant returns to scale a higher output coordination of the consumer cooperatives does not affect the total welfare as long as a nonnegative profit constraint holds in these firms. On the other hand, under decreasing returns to scale, the consumer cooperatives contribute more to social welfare when acting on behalf of all consumers. This is because, by coordinating consumers’ preferences, these firms can reduce their market output, thus helping the market to come closer to the first best. All together these results seem to provide an argument in favour of the recent process of integration involving consumer cooperatives in many developed countries.”


Social disclosure based on the GRI guidelines for the social economy: a tool for improving member-cooperative relations               

Francisca Castilla-Polo, Dolores Gallardo-Vázquez and Mª Isabel Sánchez-Hernández. CIRIEC-España, Revista de Economia Pública, Social y Cooperativa, nº 83, pp. 143-168, 2015

http://www.ciriec-revistaeconomia.es/

banco/CIRIEC_8306_Castilla_et_al.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The problems of the members within the cooperative society and their relation to Stakeholder Theory are the focus of this paper. Considering not only the members’ democratic participation but also their potential role in different economic functions, we address the need for proper management of member-cooperative relations. To help create or maintain these relations, we suggest using social disclosure, particularly sustainability reports prepared according to the specific GRI guidelines for the Social Economy. They are easy to apply and the benefits associated with their use would appear to more than offset the costs of implementation, justifying this proposal. In conclusion, we can state that sustainability reporting is a powerful tool for cooperatives to improve their relations with their members, although we have found few social disclosure initiatives in this type of company.”


Work Engagement in the Third Sector

Kirsikka Selander. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 4, pages 1391-1411, August 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007

/s11266-014-9465-y

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: It has been assumed that third-sector organizations attract ideologically oriented employees. Therefore, employees consider their work as more meaningful. However, employees’ ideological orientation has not been taken into account in previous studies on work engagement. With this in mind, the present study sets out to apply an extended job demand-resources (JD-R) model in a survey conducted with Finnish third-sector employees (N = 1,412). The results showed that third-sector employees report higher work engagement than employees generally in the work engagement studies. In addition to job demands and resources, work engagement is associated with public service motivation and value congruence. Thus, public service motivation theory offers more insight into third-sector employees’ work engagement than the conventionally used JD-R model.”


Sector Choice: How Fair Trade Entrepreneurs Choose Between Nonprofit and For-Profit Forms

Curtis Child, Eva M. Witesman and David B. Braudt. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 4, pages 832-851, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/832?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: This article advances scholarship on the institutional choice literature by examining how, when both options are available, entrepreneurs choose between establishing for-profit and nonprofit organizations. The article accounts for a fuller range of motivations that shape entrepreneurial decisions than is typically recognized in the scholarship. Data come from semi-structured interviews with founders of businesses and nonprofits in the fair trade industry, where both organizational forms are common. We find support for some, but not all, of the assumptions that are built into prevailing theories of the nonprofit sector and find that founders are motivated by factors not often addressed in the relevant scholarship—especially the normative and symbolic meanings they attach to organizational form. Based on these findings, we propose a new supply theory that focuses on four motivations for sector choice.”


Developing and Validating a Measure of Stakeholder Culture for the Not-for-Profit Sector

Jinhua Chen. Kirsikka Selander. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 4, pages 1189-1218, August 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007

/s11266-015-9590-2

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Jones et al.’s (Acad Manag Rev 32(1):137–155, 2007) typology of stakeholder culture, representing the beliefs, values and practices that an organization has towards its stakeholders, has received widespread recognition. Yet, the literature lacks an instrument to quantify the typology. This study provides such an instrument by constructing and validating a scale of Jones et al.’s (2007) four other-regarding stakeholder cultures of corporate egoist, instrumentalist, moralist and altruist in the not-for-profit (NFP) context. Mail survey data were collected from top management of 621 Australian NFP companies limited by guarantee that were drawn from various online databases. Exploratory factor analysis produced a five-factor structure with the altruist factor split into two sub-factors. Confirmatory factor analysis supported Jones et al.’s (2007) typology by showing a satisfactory fit of a four-factor model. A major contribution of the study is that the scale may be used in future research into stakeholder culture and salience in NFPs and similar organizations.”


Nonprofit Collaboration with Luxury Brands: Positive and Negative Effects for Cause-Related Marketing

Silke Boenigk and Viktoria Schuchardt. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 2015, volume 44, issue 4, pages 708–733, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/708?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Luxury brands and nonprofit organizations (NPOs) increasingly engage in cause-related marketing (CRM) relationships. However, most previous studies analyzed CRM effects from a corporate, rather than a nonprofit, perspective. This study reverses the viewpoint to determine if luxury brand partners are beneficial for NPOs. Using a fictitious CRM cooperation between Plan International Germany and the Hotel Adlon Kempinski Berlin, two experimental studies obtained responses from 791 customers and 259 nonprofit employees/volunteers. The results show that partnering with a luxury brand can be beneficial because it enables the NPO to raise additional donations, enhances attitudes toward the nonprofit brand, and increases the chances of acquiring wealthy customers as future donors. Yet negative effects also arise, such as identification conflicts, especially among nonprofit employees and volunteers. Overall, this study reveals that nonprofit managers can pursue cooperation strategies with luxury brands—as long as they consider some important precautions.”


Turnover and Retention in Nonprofit Employment: The Korean College Graduates’ Experience

Chulhee Kang, Sooyeon Huh, Sangmi Cho and Erica Yoonkyung Auh. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume  44, issue 4, pages 641-664, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/641?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Korea’s nonprofit sector has undergone a sudden expansion in the last decade and its nonprofits experienced high employee turnover. This study is the first in Korean literature to examine workforce shifts in nonprofit organizations and explore influential factors that explain job changes from the nonprofit sector to other sectors. Using a three-wave panel data set of community college/university graduates, the Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey, we conducted a discrete-time survival analysis with the dependent variable of actual turnover. Our findings indicate that over half of employees left nonprofits within a year, and the majority found a new job in for-profit organizations. Different factors predicted turnover to for-profits, government agencies, and educational or research institutes. Age, wage level, employment type, and the size of nonprofit organizations explained employee shifts. Satisfaction with one’s overall job, job content, social reputation, and opportunities for career development were significant predictors. Implications for nonprofit organizations are discussed.”


Organizational Challenges of Community Associations: Applying Nonprofit Research to Real-World Problems

Margaret E. Harris. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 4, pages 796–813, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/796?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Can voluntary and nonprofit research be helpful for local community associations (CAs) seeking to respond to organizational challenges and problems? This article builds on a study of an organizational crisis in an English CA to explore this question. The events that precipitated and prolonged the crisis seemed inexplicable to outside observers. Yet the study found that much of what occurred could be explained in the light of earlier theories and research. The article concludes that voluntary and nonprofit scholarship, as well as generic organizational theories, has the potential to be helpful for community association members and activists in anticipating and responding to organizational problems. But scholars need to do more to disseminate existing research findings, to make them accessible and to adapt them to the distinctive needs and real-world problems of community associations


La transmission au cœur de l’économie politique des coopératives

Joseph Sangiorgio et Hervé Defalvard. Chaire de recherche en économie sociale et solidaire de l’UPUM, Cahier de recherche, issue 2015-2, 13 pages, février 2015

http://www.recma.org/sites/default

/files/cahier_2015-2.pdf

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: Dans une première partie, nous appliquerons cette grille aux organisations de l’économie sociale et solidaire et, en particulier, aux coopératives telles qu’elles existent en droit. Après avoir déconstruit la propriété et son approche patrimoniale de l’entreprise, nous montrerons que la transmission devient l’élément central dès lors que l’on aborde son activité collective en termes de projet politique. Dans une seconde partie, ce projet politique trouvera avec l’économie politique du Commun une manière de se décliner, faisant jouer au territoire le rôle que Marx accordait à la classe ouvrière dans le dépassement du capitalisme (cf. Defalvard, 2013). Nous l’illustrerons en prenant l’exemple de l’expérimentation Coop’ à-prendre dont le projet évolue vers une coopérative de territoire.

Innovation sociale

Social innovation / Innovación social

 

New Frontiers in Social Innovation Research (book)

Alex Nicholls, Julie Simon, Madeleine Gabriel. Palgrave Macmillan Edition, (in press), September 2015.

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/

new-frontiers-in-social-innovation-research-

alex-nicholls/?K=9781137506795

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “Interest in social innovation continues to rise, from governments setting up social innovation 'labs' to large corporations developing social innovation strategies. Yet theory lags behind practice, and this hampers our ability to understand social innovation and make the most of its potential. This collection brings together work by leading social innovation researchers globally, exploring the practice and process of researching social innovation, its nature and effects. Combining theoretical papers and empirical studies, it shows how social innovation is blurring traditional boundaries between the market, the state and civil society, thereby developing new forms of services, relationships and collaborations. It takes a critical perspective, analyzing potential downsides of social innovation that often remain unexplored or are glossed over, yet concludes with a powerful vision of the potential for social innovation to transform society. It aims to be a valuable resource for students and researchers, as well as policy makers and others supporting and leading social innovation.”


Scaling Out, Scaling Up, Scaling Deep: Strategies of Non-profits in Advancing Systemic Social Innovation

Moore Michele-Lee, Riddell Darcy et Vocisano Dana. Journal of Corporate Citizenship, volume 2015, issue 58, pages 67-84, June 2015.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/glbj/

jcc/2015/00002015/00000058/art00009

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “To effect large system change, niche or local-level innovations must span spatial and institutional scales to achieve broader systemic impact. Leaders of social innovation, in particular those who work in non-profit organizations and funders of nonprofit and civil society organizations, are increasingly concerned with scaling the positive impact of their investments. This study examines the case of the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and the implementation of a deliberate strategy, named the Applied Dissemination initiative, to build grantee capacity and to accelerate their initiatives to achieve systemic change. One part of the strategy involved an educational intervention, where leaders of more than a dozen national-level initiatives in Canada convened regularly over a period of several years to learn from each other's efforts to achieve scale. The group was successful not only in their efforts to scale for positive impact on their respective issue areas, but also in catalyzing a field of practice in Canada with a growing expertise in scaling innovation for systemic change. The findings show the success of six different strategies that may be adopted to scale innovation on the pathway to largescale or systemic impact, which cut across three different types of scaling: scaling out, scaling up, and scaling dee


POLITIQUES PUBLIQUES

Public Policies / Politicas Publicas


Social Enterprise, Policy Entrepreneurs, and the Third Sector: The Case of South Korea

Eun Sun Lee. VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, volume 26, issue 4, pages 1084-1099, August 2015.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007

/s11266-015-9584-0

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: “The U.S. and the U.K. are considered as successful models of social enterprise. The Korean government benchmarked these two models in the hope of achieving similar success, without much avail. The growth of social enterprises in South Korea is attributed to the country’s characteristically strong central government and its creation of relevant institutions and provision of support services. However, this paper provides an alternate explanation by highlighting role of the third sector as the ‘policy entrepreneur’ in agenda-setting and policy implementation with regards to social enterprises in South Korea. Additionally, the decentralized local governments as well as the market structure dominated by big businesses are also examined as the main contributors to ‘policy windows’ for the third sector’s policy entrepreneurship. The paper showcases successful development of social enterprise despite the absence of a welfare state or a well-developed third sector, and argues that the phenomenon should hold numerous policy implications for other Asian countries.”


AUTRES

Other / Otros


Analysis of Audit Fees for Nonprofits: Resource Dependence and Agency Theory Approaches

Sandra Verbruggen, Johan Christiaens, Anne-Mie Reheul and Tom Van Caneghem. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, volume 44, issue 4, pages 734-754, August 2015.

http://nvs.sagepub.com/content/44/4/734?etoc

Abstract excerpted from the URL cited above: In contrast to the extensive research on audit fees of for-profit companies, literature on nonprofit audit fees is limited. In this article, audit fee determinants are tested using a Belgian sample of nonprofits. We find that Big4 auditors charge fee premiums, and that nonprofit expert auditors charge lower fees when expertise is measured at audit partner level (as opposed to audit firm level). These findings hold after controlling for self-selection by using propensity score matching. We also address the resource dependence and agency characteristics of nonprofit audit clients and find that both are relevant in explaining audit pricing.”


Sensemaking in collaborative management research: Insights from an Italian social cooperative  

Solari Luca, David Coghlan and Abraham B. Shani. Research in Organizational Change and Development. Volume 23, pages 167-194

http://www.scopus.com/record/display.url?eid=2-s2.0-84937410655&origin=SingleRecordEmailAlert&txGid=808

E62DD650F47D9C6D5E00F65F74D2F.CnvicAmOODVwpVrjSeqQ%3a1